Fahrenheit 451 (Flamingo modern classics)

by Ray Bradbury | Other |
ISBN: 9780006546061 Global Overview for this book
Registered by mafarrimond of Hawarden, Wales United Kingdom on 12/18/2009
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5 journalers for this copy...
Journal Entry 1 by mafarrimond from Hawarden, Wales United Kingdom on Friday, December 18, 2009
My favourite book! or at least one of them.

I first read this book when I was about 14 years old and have revisited many a time.

If you were in Montag's position which boook or books would you memorise to pass on? I have thought about this long and hard - my book "Hard Times" by Charles Dickens.

Journal Entry 2 by mafarrimond at St Andrews, Scotland United Kingdom on Friday, December 18, 2009

Released 12 yrs ago (12/18/2009 UTC) at St Andrews, Scotland United Kingdom

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The start of it's journey in The Favourite Book Roundabout. Read and enjoy.

Please let me know which book/s you would commit to memory.

Journal Entry 3 by Philosoraptor from Frankfurt am Main, Hessen Germany on Wednesday, January 6, 2010
Received this as part of the Favourite Book Roundabout. Thank you! Can't wait to get stuck in and offer my humble thoughts with others.

Journal Entry 4 by Philosoraptor from Frankfurt am Main, Hessen Germany on Friday, January 29, 2010
Had a small spell in hospital and so had lots of spare time to get stuck into this book. Really was a lifesaver, read it cover to cover in one sitting.

This is very much a prophetic book falling in line with Orwell/Ella Minnow Pea in exploring dystopian themes of censorship and restriction of liberties but also a warning against the shallow and soul-destroying valuelessness of consumerism. It goes beyond the clichéd Cold War culture of fear, it shows that a life without books means a life without critical thought, without knowledge, without the benefits of conflicting philosophies and ultimately, without happiness or purpose. Importantly, we see that there will always be those who resist, indeed it's as if human nature itself cannot resist for long its curiosity and thirst for knowledge. I'd like to think I would be like Granger or Clarisse in their resistance because of that, I can really relate with their values.

And if I had to commit one book to memory? An impossible question to answer. I'd like to remember every book I've enjoyed! Though I would probably depend on others for the classics of literature and memorise something I enjoy, like 'Cloud Atlas', a recent favourite.

Thanks very much for a thought-provoking read, great choice I can see why it's one of your faves. Will send this on shortly.

Journal Entry 5 by Philosoraptor at St Andrews, Scotland United Kingdom on Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Released 11 yrs ago (2/9/2010 UTC) at St Andrews, Scotland United Kingdom

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Sent via 2nd class post to next person on the roundabout list. Enjoy!

Journal Entry 6 by winggrovalskiiwing from Zehlendorf, Berlin Germany on Wednesday, February 17, 2010
just received the book on the mail, will read it soon

Journal Entry 7 by winggrovalskiiwing from Zehlendorf, Berlin Germany on Sunday, March 7, 2010
I really enjoyed this book, though the futuristic world view was rather scary. You can see bits and pieces of it in our society today and it makes me want to fight even harder against consumerism, kids growing up on TV and video games and anything that tries to restrict thoughts.

Which book would I memorize? I don't know, it's a really hard decision. Maybe poems by Goethe and Schiller. Or maybe Kundera's "Lightness of Being". Or even Umberto Eco's "The Name of the Rose". But that one has so much Latin in it, it would be hard to memorize.

The book will be mailed to liniP tomorrow.

Journal Entry 8 by LiniP from Harrow, Greater London United Kingdom on Sunday, March 14, 2010
Got the book on Thursday as part of the favourite book roundabout. I have started reading it and am really looking forward to doing so. I recently watched the film which highly impressed me.

Journal Entry 9 by LiniP from Harrow, Greater London United Kingdom on Friday, March 19, 2010
What a great book. I really enjoyed reading it and it made me think a lot. Apart from the book perspective, I especially were intrigued by the human interactions, e.g. Montag and his wife. I am surprised I had not read the book earlier. Somebody did a book review on this book in my high school English class but it never caught my attention then.

As for the book I would memorize it would probably be a children´s book like Krabat by Otfried Preußler or Momo by Michael Ende.

The following quote came to my mind while reading the book:

"THEY CAME FIRST for the Communists,
and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist.

THEN THEY CAME for the Jews,
and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew.

THEN THEY CAME for the trade unionists,
and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist.

THEN THEY CAME for the Catholics,
and I didn’t speak up because I was a Protestant.

THEN THEY CAME for me
and by that time no one was left to speak up." Martin Niemöller

Thanks for sharing this book.

Journal Entry 10 by LiniP at on Thursday, March 25, 2010

Released 11 yrs ago (3/25/2010 UTC) at

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Am sending the book on today.

Journal Entry 11 by Meg72 from Ílhavo, Aveiro Portugal on Sunday, May 9, 2010
Book arrived safe and sound. Thanks!

Journal Entry 12 by Meg72 at Ílhavo, Aveiro Portugal on Wednesday, May 26, 2010
This book gave me the chills. A world without books? What a frightening vision! Don´t get me wrong, I enjoyed reading "Fahrenheit 451", but the story was so sad, about a very grim future. Let us hope it never comes to this, but the truth is, we have some signs in our society, such as fast living, fast entertainment, not having time to think or just talk to your neighbours. No, this future is not for me.
Now, which book would I commit to memory? Probably, "Jonathan Livingston Seagull", by Richard Bach. First of all, it is a small book, which can be easily memorized. But most importantly, it is a book about going against the flow, not conforming with your fate and daring to take a step into the unknown. I think this is what makes society move forward...
Well, off it goes to Australia!

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