Around the World Virtual Bookbox

by Various | Literature & Fiction |
ISBN: Global Overview for this book
Registered by katrinat of Southend-on-Sea, Essex United Kingdom on 5/22/2008
Buy from one of these Booksellers:
Amazon.com | Amazon UK | Amazon CA | Amazon DE | Amazon FR | Amazon IT | Bol.com
16 journalers for this copy...
Journal Entry 1 by katrinat from Southend-on-Sea, Essex United Kingdom on Thursday, May 22, 2008
I'm thinking about setting this up, these are my ideas:
-it would contain between 6-8 books minimum.
- it would be to help people complete the around the world challenge, or those who are interested in just reading books from different countries.
- I would prefer people to avoid picking all the typical books that the majority of people have read (ie the Book Seller of Kabul, The Kite Runner etc) and try to be adventurous.
- Both fiction, poetry and travelogue, auto/biography could be included.
- I would ask that no more than 2 books from anyone country would be travelling in the 'box' at once.

As a virtual bookbox I propose that I would set up an initial list of books (with a copy of the opening paragrah/lines/synopsis- optional) I would then email that list to the next person, (the list will contain the name and author of the book, plus the name of the person offering the book) they can pick what they want, it is the responsibilty of the person picking the books to contact the owner of the book with their address. This person will let me know the books thay have taken 'out' and put 'in' (by emailing or pm) and send the adjusted list to the next person and me (so I could always have a record in case things go squewiff at any point), and so on and so on. If you take one book from the box you must replace with one book, remove two books you replace with two books and so on. I will also try and keep this topped up by adding extra books as the box moves along (as I read them).
People would also be welcomed to recommend any books that they know of from some of the harder countries to help those completing the Around the World Challenge.
***If you sign up you would need to be willing to send your books INTL- surface mail if needed***

That sounds like a lot of rules I know, but I do want this to be a good box.
Just finding out if people are interested at the mo. If you are interested let me know, you might even see some books on my tbr or avaliable page that would be worth including.

Participants:
Tubereader (UK)
celticseahorse (UK)
fbeatriz (Portugal)
kizmiaz (Portugal)
butterfly-noir (Portugal)
okyrhoe (Greece)
kotus123 (Germany)
klaradyn (S. Africa)
meexia (Singapore)
franaloe)(Netherlands)
Sherlockfan (NZ)
PokPok (California- USA)
Erishkigal (USA)--its here--
DoveiLibri(Florida)
deadsteen (New York)
house-elf (Canada)
loveamystery (Canada)
Then back to me!


Round 2 will be starting in October/November
Participants:
okyrhoe (Greece)
Tubereader (Luxenburg)
Meexia (Singapore)
Butterfly-noir (Portugal)
psychogiz (Turkey)


Books I'm putting in: (may change and will be adding more)
Goodbye Tsugumi by Banana Yoshimoto (Japan)
The Valkyries, Coehlo (Mojave Desert)
Unless, Carol Shields (Canada)
Fugitive Pieces (Canada)
Family Matters, Mistry (India)
The Gathering, Enright (Ireland)
The Famished Road, Okri (Africa)
The True History of the Kelly Gang, (Australia)
Gould's Book of Fish, Flanagan (Australia)

Journal Entry 2 by katrinat from Southend-on-Sea, Essex United Kingdom on Thursday, May 22, 2008


Books entered into the Virtual Bookbox by katrinat:
MIDNIGHTS CHILDREN - SALMAN RUSDIE (INDIA) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153516)
First couple of lines: "I was born in the city of Bombay... once upon a time. No, that won't do, there's no getting away from the date: I was born in Doctor Narlikar's Nursing Home on August 15th, 1947. And the time? The time matters too....."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT: MICHAEL ONDAATJE (SRI LANKA) Entered by katrinat(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153505)
First paragraph:"She stands up in the garden where she has been working and looks into the distance. She has sensed a shift in the weather. There is another gust of wind, a buckle of noise in the air, and the tall cypresses sway. She turns and moves uphill towards the house, climbing over a low wall, feeling the first drops of rain on her bare arms. She crosses the loggia and quickly enters the house."

COLLECTED POEMS: LES MURRAY (AUSTRALIA) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153488)
Example of a poem:
Ah, I was as soiled as money, old as rag,
I was building a humpy beside a gully of woes,
Till the bumpof your drum, the fit of your turned-up hat
Drew me to eat your stew, salute your flag

And carry your rifle far away to your wars:
Is war very big? As big as New South Wales

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN- BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481)
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 Short stories:
From the Blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU -SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/J_10455914)
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent, and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologer's poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469)
From Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought-provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in content. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ALCHEMIST - PAULO COELHO (BRAZIL - SOUTH AMERICA)Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153442)
First paragraph: "The boys name was Satiago, dusk was falling as the boy arrived with his herd at an abandoned church. The roof had fallen in long ago, and an enormous sycamore had grown on the spot where the sacristy had once stood."

THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES - FRANZ KAFKA (PRAGUE) Enterered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6158044)
This collection contains stories published during his lifetime and posthumously, all the short stories both long and short are included in this collection.

THE THIRD POLICEMAN - FLANN O'BRIEN (IRELAND) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6158050)
First few lines:"Not everyone knows how I killed old Phillip Mathers, smashing his jaw in with my spade; but first it is better to speak of my friendship with John Divney...."

STORIES OF GOD - RAINER MARIA RILKE (PRAGUE) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6158185)
From blurb: "Composed in 1899 when Rilke was only 23 the interconnected tales of 'Stories of God' were inspired by a trip to Russia the young poet had made the year previously. It is said that the vastness of the Russian landscape and the profound spirituality he percieved in the simple people he met led him to an experience of finding God in all things, and to the conviction that God seeks to be known by us as passionately as we might seek to know God."

SOUR SWEET - TIMOTHY MO (HONG KNOG) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5693058)
First few lines: The Chens had been living in the UK for four years, which was long enough to have lost their place in the society from which they had emigrated but not long enough to feel comfortable in the new..."




This list will be sent to Tubereader.Tubereader will need to contact the person who entered the books into the 'box' (in this case me!) to say what he/she wants to takeout. I will then send them out asap, Tubereader will then add a new journal entry with the books avaliable in the 'box' including any that they have entered. Tubereader will then need to pm the next person on the list with a copy of this journal entry and the VBB BCID number.
Please remember to visit the journal again and post your review or links to your review of any book you have taken from the box.

Released 11 yrs ago (5/24/2008 UTC) at The world in Around the World VBB, Virtual Bookbox -- Controlled Releases

WILD RELEASE NOTES:

RELEASE NOTES:

Sent a copy of the books avaliable to Tubereader, hope there is something to grab your eye

Journal Entry 4 by Tubereader from Madrid, Madrid Spain on Monday, May 26, 2008
What a great bookbox you have put together, katrinat!! Thanks so much for sharing!

I would almost like to take out all the books, but will restrain myself to "only" four:
- Midgnight's children
- The English patient
- The third policeman
- Sour sweet

And I will be adding in:
- White Mughals - from William Dalrymple (INDIA) - (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163607)
- After the quake - from Haruki Murakami (JAPAN) - (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163621)
- No word from Gurb - from Eduardo Mendoza (SPAIN) - (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163635)
- Around the world in 80 days - from Jules Verne (AROUND THE WORLD) - (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163656)

Ther is a bit of explanation on each of the books and why I have added them to this virtual bookbox. I will make a new JE below with the "new list" of books included in the box.

Journal Entry 5 by Tubereader from Madrid, Madrid Spain on Monday, May 26, 2008
So, here is the new "composition" of the box:

COLLECTED POEMS: LES MURRAY (AUSTRALIA) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153488)
Example of a poem:
Ah, I was as soiled as money, old as rag,
I was building a humpy beside a gully of woes,
Till the bumpof your drum, the fit of your turned-up hat
Drew me to eat your stew, salute your flag

And carry your rifle far away to your wars:
Is war very big? As big as New South Wales

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN- BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481)
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 Short stories:
From the Blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU -SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/J_10455914)
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent, and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologer's poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469)
From Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought-provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in content. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ALCHEMIST - PAULO COELHO (BRAZIL - SOUTH AMERICA)Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153442)
First paragraph: "The boys name was Satiago, dusk was falling as the boy arrived with his herd at an abandoned church. The roof had fallen in long ago, and an enormous sycamore had grown on the spot where the sacristy had once stood."

THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES - FRANZ KAFKA (PRAGUE) Enterered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6158044)
This collection contains stories published during his lifetime and posthumously, all the short stories both long and short are included in this collection.

STORIES OF GOD - RAINER MARIA RILKE (PRAGUE) Entered by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6158185)
From blurb: "Composed in 1899 when Rilke was only 23 the interconnected tales of 'Stories of God' were inspired by a trip to Russia the young poet had made the year previously. It is said that the vastness of the Russian landscape and the profound spirituality he percieved in the simple people he met led him to an experience of finding God in all things, and to the conviction that God seeks to be known by us as passionately as we might seek to know God."

WHITE MUGHALS - William Dalrymple (INDIA) - Entered by Tubereader (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163607)
FIRST SENTENCE: "On 7 November 1801, under conditions of the greatest secrecy, two figures were discreetly admitted to the gardens of the Government House in Madras"

AFTER THE QUAKE - Haruki Murakami (JAPAN) - Entered by Tubereader (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163621)
FIRST SENTENCE: "Five straight days she spent in front of the television, staring at crumbled banks and hospitals, whole blocks of stores in flames, severed rail lines and expressways"

NO WORD FROM GURB - Eduardo Mendoza (SPAIN) - Entered by Tubereader (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163635)
FIRST SENTENCE: "00.01 (local time) Landing without problems"

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS - Jules Verne (AROUND THE WORLD) - Entered by Tubereader (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163656)
FIRST SENTENCE: "Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7 Savile Row, Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814"








Released 11 yrs ago (5/26/2008 UTC) at by email in Around the World VBB, Virtual Bookbox -- Controlled Releases

WILD RELEASE NOTES:

RELEASE NOTES:

Passing the box to the next participant!

Journal Entry 7 by celticseahorse from Newquay, Cornwall United Kingdom on Friday, May 30, 2008
This is with me now. I will be adding a couple from Ireland and still working on another one or two. Just copyied off the 'rules' to check I'm sticking to them on criteria to make my final choices which I'm whittling down from a a rather large stack :-)

Will be back tomorrow with typed JE's etc...
Thanks for 'sending' this out

Journal Entry 8 by celticseahorse from Newquay, Cornwall United Kingdom on Saturday, May 31, 2008
This is my first VBB and I have loved joining in.
I am taking out 3

STORIES OF GOD - RAINER MARIA RILKE (PRAGUE) Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6158185
AFTER THE QUAKE - Haruki Murakami (JAPAN) - Entered by Tubereader
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163621)
NO WORD FROM GURB - Eduardo Mendoza (SPAIN) - Entered by Tubereader
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163635

and putting in

THE PLAGUE – ALBERT CAMUS (ALGERIA)
WHISTLING FOR ELEPHANTS – SANDI TOKSVIG – (DENMARK)
CAT’S EYES - MARGARET ATWOOD (CANADA)

I'm off to put these all on reserve now for Around the World VBB
I haven't read the Camus but have really enjoyed another of his and have another copy of this on MTBR. The others have further information on their journals and the Atwood has been travelling with BC since 2003 so very happy to send it off out into the world again :-)

A full new list follows in separate JE which I will PM on to next up fbeatriz (Portugal)

Thanks happy reading everbody.

Journal Entry 9 by celticseahorse from Newquay, Cornwall United Kingdom on Saturday, May 31, 2008
So, here is the new "composition" of the box:
COLLECTED POEMS: LES MURRAY (AUSTRALIA) Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153488)
Example of a poem:
Ah, I was as soiled as money, old as rag,
I was building a humpy beside a gully of woes,
Till the bumpof your drum, the fit of your turned-up hat
Drew me to eat your stew, salute your flag

And carry your rifle far away to your wars:
Is war very big? As big as New South Wales

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN- BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA)
Entered by katrinat(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481)
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 Short stories:
From the Blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken
down.
She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in
young
boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU -SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by
katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/J_10455914)
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent, and Eliza
Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and
a
good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to
recall
her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologer's
poetic
vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered
by
katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469)
From Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness,
death
and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are
thought-provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in
content.
They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made
Martel an
international phenomenon."

THE ALCHEMIST - PAULO COELHO (BRAZIL - SOUTH AMERICA)Entered by
katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153442)
First paragraph: "The boys name was Satiago, dusk was falling as the
boy
arrived with his herd at an abandoned church. The roof had fallen in
long
ago, and an enormous sycamore had grown on the spot where the sacristy
had
once stood."

THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES - FRANZ KAFKA (PRAGUE) Enterered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6158044)
This collection contains stories published during his lifetime and
posthumously, all the short stories both long and short are included in
this collection.

WHITE MUGHALS - William Dalrymple (INDIA) - Entered by Tubereader
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163607)
FIRST SENTENCE: "On 7 November 1801, under conditions of the greatest
secrecy, two figures were discreetly admitted to the gardens of the
Government House in Madras"


AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS - Jules Verne (AROUND THE WORLD) - Entered
by
Tubereader (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163656)
FIRST SENTENCE: "Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7 Savile Row,

Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814"


THE PLAGUE – ALBERT CAMUS (ALGERIA) – entered by Celticseahorse
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4737878 Camus
First paragraph - The unusual events described in this chronicle occurred in 194-, at Oran. Everyone agreed that, considering their somewhat extraordinary character, they were out of place there. For its ordinariness is what strikes one first about the town of Oran, which is merely a large French port on the Algerian coast, headquarters of the Prefect of a French ‘Department’

WHISTLING FOR ELEPHANTS – SANDI TOKSVIG – (DENMARK) – entered by Celticseahorse
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6179124
Book begins "There are 2 basic types of creature in Nature's kingdom. The first like frogs and turtles, produce many offspring and simply hope that some will survive. The second, like elephants and people, produce one, or two at long intervals, and make great efforts to rear them. My mother belonged in a class of her own. she produced two at short intervals and made no effort to rear them whatsoever."



CAT’S EYES - MARGARET ATWOOD (CANADA) –entered by Celticseahorse

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/560836
Blurb ...A successful painter is invited back to her hometown (Toronto) for a retrospective show of her work. While there, she is haunted by flashbacks to her childhood there, but eventually comes to an acceptance of her past as necessary steps to her present











Journal Entry 10 by UFK-537438 on Saturday, May 31, 2008
I received the box but there's any book I'm interested on. So, I will pass it to Kizmiaz.
Thanks for the chance!

Journal Entry 11 by kizmiaz from Belém , Lisboa (cidade) Portugal on Monday, June 02, 2008
Got it, thanks everyone. I'll make my choices and make a new JE with the replacements tomorrow.

Journal Entry 12 by kizmiaz from Belém , Lisboa (cidade) Portugal on Monday, June 02, 2008
Ok, I'm taking out The Complete Short Stories by Franz Kafka and I'm putting in its place The Bhagavad Gita.
Now I'll make the proper list JE and send it on to the next in line.
Thanks for setting this up katrinat.

Journal Entry 13 by kizmiaz from Belém , Lisboa (cidade) Portugal on Monday, June 02, 2008
So, here is the new "composition" of the box:
COLLECTED POEMS: LES MURRAY (AUSTRALIA) Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153488)
Example of a poem:
Ah, I was as soiled as money, old as rag,
I was building a humpy beside a gully of woes,
Till the bumpof your drum, the fit of your turned-up hat
Drew me to eat your stew, salute your flag

And carry your rifle far away to your wars:
Is war very big? As big as New South Wales

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN- BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA)
Entered by katrinat(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481)
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 Short stories:
From the Blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down.
She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young
boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU -SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by
katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/J_10455914)
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent, and Eliza
Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and
a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall
her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologer's poetic
vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered
by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469)
From Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought-provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in content.
They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an
international phenomenon."

THE ALCHEMIST - PAULO COELHO (BRAZIL - SOUTH AMERICA)Entered by
katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153442)
First paragraph: "The boys name was Satiago, dusk was falling as the
boy arrived with his herd at an abandoned church. The roof had fallen in long
ago, and an enormous sycamore had grown on the spot where the sacristy had once stood."

WHITE MUGHALS - William Dalrymple (INDIA) - Entered by Tubereader
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163607)
FIRST SENTENCE: "On 7 November 1801, under conditions of the greatest
secrecy, two figures were discreetly admitted to the gardens of the
Government House in Madras"

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS - Jules Verne (AROUND THE WORLD) - Entered
by Tubereader (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163656)
FiRST SENTENCE: "Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7 Savile Row,

THE PLAGUE – ALBERT CAMUS (ALGERIA) – entered by Celticseahorse
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4737878 Camus
First paragraph - The unusual events described in this chronicle occurred in 194-, at Oran. Everyone agreed that, considering their somewhat extraordinary character, they were out of place there. For its ordinariness is what strikes one first about the town of Oran, which is merely a large French port on the Algerian coast, headquarters of the Prefect of a French ‘Department’

WHISTLING FOR ELEPHANTS – SANDI TOKSVIG – (DENMARK) – entered by Celticseahorse
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6179124
Book begins "There are 2 basic types of creature in Nature's kingdom. The first like frogs and turtles, produce many offspring and simply hope that some will survive. The second, like elephants and people, produce one, or two at long intervals, and make great efforts to rear them. My mother belonged in a class of her own. she produced two at short intervals and made no effort to rear them whatsoever."

CAT’S EYES - MARGARET ATWOOD (CANADA) –entered by Celticseahorse
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/560836
Blurb ...A successful painter is invited back to her hometown (Toronto) for a retrospective show of her work. While there, she is haunted by flashbacks to her childhood there, but eventually comes to an acceptance of her past as necessary steps to her present

THE BHAGAVAD GITA - ANONYMOUS (INDIA) - entered by Kizmiaz
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5754857)
Synopsis: The eighteen chapters of The Bhagavad Gita (c. 500 b.c.), the glory of Sanskrit literature, encompass the whole spiritual struggle of a human soul. Its three central themes-love, light, and life-arise from the symphonic vision of God in all things and of all things in God."

Journal Entry 14 by butterfly-noir from Lisboa - City, Lisboa (cidade) Portugal on Wednesday, June 04, 2008
I'm taking out THE PLAGUE – ALBERT CAMUS (ALGERIA) – entered by Celticseahorse

and putting in THE MIRROR OF INK - JORGE LUIS BORGES (ARGENTINA - SOUTH AMERICA)

Journal Entry 15 by butterfly-noir from Lisboa - City, Lisboa (cidade) Portugal on Wednesday, June 04, 2008
So, here is the new "composition" of the box:
COLLECTED POEMS: LES MURRAY (AUSTRALIA) Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153488)
Example of a poem:
Ah, I was as soiled as money, old as rag,
I was building a humpy beside a gully of woes,
Till the bumpof your drum, the fit of your turned-up hat
Drew me to eat your stew, salute your flag

And carry your rifle far away to your wars:
Is war very big? As big as New South Wales

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN- BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA)
Entered by katrinat(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481)
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 Short stories:
From the Blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down.
She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young
boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU -SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by
katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/J_10455914)
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent, and Eliza
Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and
a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall
her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologer's poetic
vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered
by katrinat (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469)
From Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought-provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in content.
They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an
international phenomenon."

THE ALCHEMIST - PAULO COELHO (BRAZIL - SOUTH AMERICA)Entered by
katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153442)
First paragraph: "The boys name was Satiago, dusk was falling as the
boy arrived with his herd at an abandoned church. The roof had fallen in long
ago, and an enormous sycamore had grown on the spot where the sacristy had once stood."

WHITE MUGHALS - William Dalrymple (INDIA) - Entered by Tubereader
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163607)
FIRST SENTENCE: "On 7 November 1801, under conditions of the greatest
secrecy, two figures were discreetly admitted to the gardens of the
Government House in Madras"

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS - Jules Verne (AROUND THE WORLD) - Entered
by Tubereader (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163656)
FiRST SENTENCE: "Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7 Savile Row,


WHISTLING FOR ELEPHANTS – SANDI TOKSVIG – (DENMARK) – entered by Celticseahorse
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6179124
Book begins "There are 2 basic types of creature in Nature's kingdom. The first like frogs and turtles, produce many offspring and simply hope that some will survive. The second, like elephants and people, produce one, or two at long intervals, and make great efforts to rear them. My mother belonged in a class of her own. she produced two at short intervals and made no effort to rear them whatsoever."

CAT’S EYES - MARGARET ATWOOD (CANADA) –entered by Celticseahorse
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/560836
Blurb ...A successful painter is invited back to her hometown (Toronto) for a retrospective show of her work. While there, she is haunted by flashbacks to her childhood there, but eventually comes to an acceptance of her past as necessary steps to her present

THE BHAGAVAD GITA - ANONYMOUS (INDIA) - entered by Kizmiaz
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5754857)
Synopsis: The eighteen chapters of The Bhagavad Gita (c. 500 b.c.), the glory of Sanskrit literature, encompass the whole spiritual struggle of a human soul. Its three central themes-love, light, and life-arise from the symphonic vision of God in all things and of all things in God."

THE MIRROR OF INK - JORGE LUIS BORGES ( ARGENTINA- SOUTH AMERICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4401055/
this small book includes seven of Jorge luis borges most famous tales: The mirror of ink, the loterry in babylon, the library of babel, the theme of the traitos and the hero, the witness, ragnarok and blue tigers.


Journal Entry 16 by okyrhoe from Athens - Αθήνα, Attica Greece on Thursday, June 05, 2008
VBB list has arrived in Athens, Greece! :-))
I'll make my selections and also add replacement over the weekend.

Journal Entry 17 by okyrhoe from Athens - Αθήνα, Attica Greece on Sunday, June 08, 2008
I'm taking out -->
The Mirror of Ink submitted by butterfly-noir & Whistling for Elephants submitted by celticseahorse.

I'm putting in -->
FOUR SISTERS OF HOFEI, by Annping Chin (CHINA)

THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS, by Geling Yan (CHINA)

Journal Entry 18 by okyrhoe from Athens - Αθήνα, Attica Greece on Sunday, June 08, 2008
The Around the World VBB now contains:

COLLECTED POEMS: LES MURRAY (AUSTRALIA) Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153488)

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) - Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481)

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE by Isabel Allende (PERU -SOUTH AMERICA) - Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458)

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469)

THE ALCHEMIST - PAULO COELHO (BRAZIL - SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153442)

WHITE MUGHALS - William Dalrymple (INDIA) - Entered by Tubereader
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163607)

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS - Jules Verne (AROUND THE WORLD) – Entered by Tubereader
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163656)~

THE BHAGAVAD GITA - ANONYMOUS (INDIA) - entered by Kizmiaz
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5754857)

FOUR SISTERS OF HOFEI, by Annping Chin (CHINA) – entered by okyrhoe
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/2195591)
The story of four sisters growing up in provincial China in the first half of the 20th century. The author is of Taiwanese origin.

THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS, by Geling Yan (CHINA) – entered by okyrhoe
(http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3478724)
This is the first novel by the Chinese author to be translated & published in English. The story runs on 2 levels: a contemporary narrator (a ‘fifth-generation’ Chinese-American), who discovers the history of a young Chinese woman forced into prostitution in California during the Gold Rush.

Journal Entry 19 by okyrhoe from Athens - Αθήνα, Attica Greece on Friday, June 13, 2008
I sent a PM on Sunday, June 08 to "kotus123" and as yet there's no 'catch' for this BCID from Germany. I'll try another PM right now.

Today I received Whistling For Elephants which was kindly posted to me by Celticseahorse. Thanks so much!
The ultra-bright book cover is just right for a nice summer read...

Journal Entry 20 by kotus123 from Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein Germany on Saturday, June 14, 2008
VBB List had arrived & I'd missed it :´( - but thank goodness just saw okryhoe's second mail - what a wonderful selection of books! Unfortunately, though its Saturday, I have to rush as I have to put in half a days work for the next few saturdays. (Took 5 months off lastyear!) As soon as I come back I'll do my typing in as I know what I want already and have my books ready too. I'm vesy sorry for the delay everybody and esp Katrinat. Till later today then...

Journal Entry 21 by kotus123 from Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein Germany on Sunday, June 15, 2008
So here I am after agonising yet again over the list and also because the books I ordered from Sri Lanka haven't arrived yet. However I've bought 'Divisadero' the latest Ondaatje & put together a set good enough to compensate, I hope.

I'll take out
-Collecetd Poems by Les Murray entered by katrinat
-The Alchemist by Paul Coelho entered by Katrinat
-The Bhagvad Gita which otherwise I never would have read entered by Kizmiaz
-The White Mughals by William Dalrymple entered by Tubereader

I'll put in
-Divisadero by Michael Ondaatje
-The English patient by Michael Ondaatje (Booker prize winner for this book)
-Life of Pi by Jann Martel (Booker prize winner for this book)
-Daughter of the Ganges by Asha Miro - a memoir
-Youth by J M Coetzee (first author to win Booker prize twice)
-True history of the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey (winner Booker & commonwealth writers prizes)

Journal Entry 22 by kotus123 from Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein Germany on Sunday, June 15, 2008
So here is the new composition of the box.

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS - JULES VERNE (AROUND THE WORLD) entered by Tubereader
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6163656
The first paragraph: "Mr Phileas Flogg lived, in 1872, in No.7 Saville Row, Burlington Gardens, the house where Sheridan died in 1814..."

FOUR SISTERS OF HOFEI - ANNPING CHIN (CHINA) Entered by Okyrhoe
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/2195591
The story of four sisters growing up in provincial china, in the first half of 20th century. The author is of Taiwanese origin.

THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS - GELING YAN (CHINA) Entered by Okyrhoe
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3478724
This is the first novel by the chinese author to be translated & published in English. The story runs on two levels: a contemporary narrator, (a fifth genearation Chinese-American) who discovers the history of a young chinese woman forced into prostitution in California during the gold rush.

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

DIVISADERO - BY MICHAEL ONDAATJE (THE BOOK WAS WINNER OF GOVERNOR GENERAL'S LITERARY AWARD FOR FICTION 2007) Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/577-6221763
Blurb: "...a remarkable, intimate novel of intersecting lives that ranges across continents and time...In the 1970's in Northern California a father and his teenage daughters, Anna and Claire, work their farm with the help of Coop, an enigmatic young man who makes his home with them. Theirs is a makeshift family...Divisadero takes us from San Fransisco to...Nevadas casinos...to the landscapes of southern France"
My review: Cooper is adopted as is Claire, though she was brought up as though she were the twin to natural daughter Anna; Coop 'the outsider'. A novel asking deep questions about belonging, interconnecedness & identity as against time, place, people that in modern day rush, one hardly considers.
These themes are also visited in another book I've chosen, 'Daughter of the Ganges', (which I originally chose for its location!) in realistic & very personal terms - its a memoir. She was adopted and grew up in Spain and went to India to define her identity for herself.

DAUGHTER OF THE GANGES: A MEMOIR - ASHA MIRO (Spanish of Indian origin) entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/444-6221810
BLURB: ...a poignant home coming story, mixing themes as ancient as the abandoned-baby tale handed down by Moses and Homer's Oddyssey. Indian born, Barcelona adopted and raised, Miro goes to Nasik in order to uncover the truth about the mother and family who let her go...takes a swift and powerful turn when Miro unearths more than her biological origins...Daughter of Ganges describes the limits of western solipsism and the shock a European might experience when trying to discover 'themselves' in the midst of third world suffering.
my review: I loved it (and have ordered another copy for myself!), a story told with heart felt passion and deep sincerity, its background is a good foil to Ondaatje's as he was born in the Indian sub continent to a very differnt life style, living in the upper echeolons of the colonoal society where his ancestors were amongst the close circle around the Dutch Governor-Gereral. This real life story takes place mostly in rural, poverty stricken India, with flashes of her life in Barcelona.

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.


YOUTH BY J.M.COETZEE (South African living in England) Author the first to win Booker Prize twice Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/267-6221808
Blurb: The narrator of YOUTH a student in the South Africa of the 1950's, has long been plotting an escape from his native country...Studying mathematics, reading poetry, saving money, he tries to ensure that when he arrives in the real world, wherever that may be, he will be prepared to experience life to its full intensity, and transform it into art.
Arriving at last in Lonodn, however, he finds neither poetry nor romance...YOUTH is a remarkable potrait of a consciousness, isolated and adrift, turning on itself.
My review: Its more Virgina Woolf and is a gently done psychological study, dealing again with the theme of separateness versus belonging, colonial past and immigration. The setting is South Africa and mostly London.
I would have added a Literature Nobel prize winner Nadine Gordimer as a foil if I had a copy, but as there is a South african reader later in the list so there might be one of Gordimer or even a Wole Soyinka later. Africa has many wonderful writers in English - perhaps one of the few very positive effects of colonisation! Or perhaps one by Naguib Mahfouz, the Egyptian Nobel Literature Prize winner whose works are translated into English, would be nice. (Is this what you wanted us to do karinat when you asked for titles & writers? I hope so - been typing with 2 fingers for ages!!)


THE TRUE HISTORY OF THE KELLY GANG BY PETER CAREY (AUSTRALIAN living in NY) - Author winner of Booker prize & Commonwealth Prize Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/974-6122449
Blurb:In a dazzling act of ventroquolism, Peter Carey gives Ned Kelly a voice so wild, passionate and original that it is impossible not to believe that the famous bushranger himself is speaking from beyond the grave...TRUE HISTORY...is the song of Australia, and it sings its protest in a voice at once crude and delicate, menacing and heart wrenching. Carey gives us Ned Kelley as orphan, as Oedipus, as horse thief, farmer, bush ranger, reformer, bank robber, police killer, and finally as his country's beloved Robin Hood.
My review: As the blurb says - Kelly speaks. Listen to him to understand something of the Australian soul, why for many he is a folk hero the same as Jesse Jackson was in the US. Kelly and the unofficial anthem 'Dancing Matilda' belong to the national consciousness of the OZ. I also see some parallels with Jean Valjean of Les Miserables fame/infame...
The setting is ofcourse Australia and will replace Collected Poems of Les Murray, the only book from Down - Under in the VBB which I've taken out. Another colonial writer as all mine are except for the Martell.

My last two additions are 'other' books by prize winning authors as katrinat asked for something other than the standard choices. And Miro is a first timer and the book is autobiographical.

The list has another pair choice if anyone is interested - ISABEl ALLANDE & THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS. Both deal with aspects of the Califirnia Gold Rush - should be a good read. I considered that too ;) In the end took 'only' four! I know how you felt Tubereader.

So, Happy Reading everybody and may you have an excruciating choice to make! And thank you katrinat, for a fantastic idea and for starting off with such a fabulous choice of books.



Journal Entry 23 by klaradyn from Praha, Praha Czech Republic on Tuesday, June 17, 2008
Thanks, kotus123 and katrinat, I received the BCID for the bookbox today.

These are the books I'm taking out:

Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne (entered by Tubereader)
Four Sisters of Hofei by Annping Chin (entered by Okyrhoe)
Daughter of the Ganges by Asha Miro (entered by kotus123)

These are the books I'm putting in:

The Terminal Man by Alfred Mehran with Andrew Donkin (no country / stateless)
A Time of Angels by Patricia Schonstein (South Africa)
The Empress of South America by Nigel Cawthorne (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)

Journal Entry 24 by klaradyn from Praha, Praha Czech Republic on Tuesday, June 17, 2008
New composition of the VBB. Click on each title to see the journal entry for the particular book, and on the name of the member to go to their bookshelf.

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN by BRET EASTON ELLIS (America)
Entered by katrinat
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories. From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE by ISABEL ALLENDE (Peru)
Entered by katrinat
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS by YANN MARTEL (Spain)
Entered by katrinat
From the blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

CAT’S EYE by MARGARET ATWOOD (Canada)
Entered by celticseahorse
Blurb: A successful painter is invited back to her hometown (Toronto) for a retrospective show of her work. While there, she is haunted by flashbacks to her childhood there, but eventually comes to an acceptance of her past as necessary steps to her present.

THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS by GELING YAN (China)
Entered by Okyrhoe
This is the first novel by the Chinese author to be translated and published in English. The story runs on two levels: a contemporary narrator, (a fifth genearation Chinese-American) who discovers the history of a young Chinese woman forced into prostitution in California during the gold rush.

THE ENGLISH PATIENT by MICHAEL ONDAATJE (Sri Lanka)
Entered by kotus123
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"

DIVISADERO by MICHAEL ONDAATJE (Sri Lanka)
Entered by kotus123
Blurb: "A remarkable, intimate novel of intersecting lives that ranges across continents and time...In the 1970s in Northern California a father and his teenage daughters, Anna and Claire, work their farm with the help of Coop, an enigmatic young man who makes his home with them. Theirs is a makeshift family. Divisadero takes us from San Fransisco to...Nevada’s casinos...to the landscapes of southern France"

LIFE OF PI by YANN MARTEL (Spain)
Entered by kotus123
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger. The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.

YOUTH by J.M.COETZEE (South Africa)
Entered by kotus123
Blurb: The narrator of YOUTH, a student in the South Africa of the 1950s, has long been plotting an escape from his native country. Studying mathematics, reading poetry, saving money, he tries to ensure that when he arrives in the real world, wherever that may be, he will be prepared to experience life to its full intensity, and transform it into art. Arriving at last in Lonodn, however, he finds neither poetry nor romance. YOUTH is a remarkable portrait of a consciousness, isolated and adrift, turning on itself.

THE TRUE HISTORY OF THE KELLY GANG by PETER CAREY (Australia)
Entered by kotus123
Blurb: In a dazzling act of ventroquolism, Peter Carey gives Ned Kelly a voice so wild, passionate and original that it is impossible not to believe that the famous bushranger himself is speaking from beyond the grave...TRUE HISTORY is the song of Australia, and it sings its protest in a voice at once crude and delicate, menacing and heartwrenching. Carey gives us Ned Kelley as orphan, as Oedipus, as horse thief, farmer, bush ranger, reformer, bank robber, police killer, and finally as his country's beloved Robin Hood.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

BCID and composition of box sent to next participant on 17 June 2008.

Journal Entry 25 by meexia from City of London, Greater London United Kingdom on Tuesday, June 24, 2008
Been thinking about it for a couple of days.

I'm gonna take out Cat's Eye and put in Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri.

Journal Entry 26 by meexia from City of London, Greater London United Kingdom on Tuesday, June 24, 2008
New composition:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS - GELING YAN (CHINA) Entered by Okyrhoe
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3478724
This is the first novel by the chinese author to be translated & published in English. The story runs on two levels: a contemporary narrator, (a fifth genearation Chinese-American) who discovers the history of a young chinese woman forced into prostitution in California during the gold rush.

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

DIVISADERO - BY MICHAEL ONDAATJE (THE BOOK WAS WINNER OF GOVERNOR GENERAL'S LITERARY AWARD FOR FICTION 2007) Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/577-6221763
Blurb: "...a remarkable, intimate novel of intersecting lives that ranges across continents and time...In the 1970's in Northern California a father and his teenage daughters, Anna and Claire, work their farm with the help of Coop, an enigmatic young man who makes his home with them. Theirs is a makeshift family...Divisadero takes us from San Fransisco to...Nevadas casinos...to the landscapes of southern France"
My review: Cooper is adopted as is Claire, though she was brought up as though she were the twin to natural daughter Anna; Coop 'the outsider'. A novel asking deep questions about belonging, interconnecedness & identity as against time, place, people that in modern day rush, one hardly considers.
These themes are also visited in another book I've chosen, 'Daughter of the Ganges', (which I originally chose for its location!) in realistic & very personal terms - its a memoir. She was adopted and grew up in Spain and went to India to define her identity for herself.

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

YOUTH BY J.M.COETZEE (South African living in England) Author the first to win Booker Prize twice Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/267-6221808
Blurb: The narrator of YOUTH a student in the South Africa of the 1950's, has long been plotting an escape from his native country...Studying mathematics, reading poetry, saving money, he tries to ensure that when he arrives in the real world, wherever that may be, he will be prepared to experience life to its full intensity, and transform it into art.
Arriving at last in Lonodn, however, he finds neither poetry nor romance...YOUTH is a remarkable potrait of a consciousness, isolated and adrift, turning on itself.
My review: Its more Virgina Woolf and is a gently done psychological study, dealing again with the theme of separateness versus belonging, colonial past and immigration. The setting is South Africa and mostly London.
I would have added a Literature Nobel prize winner Nadine Gordimer as a foil if I had a copy, but as there is a South african reader later in the list so there might be one of Gordimer or even a Wole Soyinka later. Africa has many wonderful writers in English - perhaps one of the few very positive effects of colonisation! Or perhaps one by Naguib Mahfouz, the Egyptian Nobel Literature Prize winner whose works are translated into English, would be nice. (Is this what you wanted us to do karinat when you asked for titles & writers? I hope so - been typing with 2 fingers for ages!!)


THE TRUE HISTORY OF THE KELLY GANG BY PETER CAREY (AUSTRALIAN living in NY) - Author winner of Booker prize & Commonwealth Prize Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/974-6122449
Blurb:In a dazzling act of ventroquolism, Peter Carey gives Ned Kelly a voice so wild, passionate and original that it is impossible not to believe that the famous bushranger himself is speaking from beyond the grave...TRUE HISTORY...is the song of Australia, and it sings its protest in a voice at once crude and delicate, menacing and heart wrenching. Carey gives us Ned Kelley as orphan, as Oedipus, as horse thief, farmer, bush ranger, reformer, bank robber, police killer, and finally as his country's beloved Robin Hood.
My review: As the blurb says - Kelly speaks. Listen to him to understand something of the Australian soul, why for many he is a folk hero the same as Jesse Jackson was in the US. Kelly and the unofficial anthem 'Dancing Matilda' belong to the national consciousness of the OZ. I also see some parallels with Jean Valjean of Les Miserables fame/infame...
The setting is ofcourse Australia and will replace Collected Poems of Les Murray, the only book from Down - Under in the VBB which I've taken out. Another colonial writer as all mine are except for the Martell.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

INTERPRETER OF MALADIES by JHUMPA LAHIRI (India)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5511760
Entered by meexia
The author is US born of Bengali parents. This book is a collection of short stories about Indians in exile (9 in total). Winner of the Pulitzer prize 2000, PEN/Hemingway award, and New Yorker Prize for best first book.

Ok, hope I do this right. I'm going to contact the next person soon.

Journal Entry 27 by franaloe from Utrecht, Utrecht Netherlands on Saturday, June 28, 2008
I think this bookbox is so cool! I'm going to think about what books I'll take out and register some books to put in. Thanks for sharing!

Journal Entry 28 by franaloe from Utrecht, Utrecht Netherlands on Sunday, June 29, 2008
OK. So I decided to take out YOUTH by Coetzee, and DIVISADERO by Ondaatje.
I am adding ONE PEOPLE by Guy Kennaway (UK/JAMAICA), and THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by Umberto Eco (ITALY).

The bookbox now contains the following books:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS - GELING YAN (CHINA) Entered by Okyrhoe
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3478724
This is the first novel by the chinese author to be translated & published in English. The story runs on two levels: a contemporary narrator, (a fifth genearation Chinese-American) who discovers the history of a young chinese woman forced into prostitution in California during the gold rush.

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TRUE HISTORY OF THE KELLY GANG BY PETER CAREY (AUSTRALIAN living in NY) - Author winner of Booker prize & Commonwealth Prize Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/974-6122449
Blurb:In a dazzling act of ventroquolism, Peter Carey gives Ned Kelly a voice so wild, passionate and original that it is impossible not to believe that the famous bushranger himself is speaking from beyond the grave...TRUE HISTORY...is the song of Australia, and it sings its protest in a voice at once crude and delicate, menacing and heart wrenching. Carey gives us Ned Kelley as orphan, as Oedipus, as horse thief, farmer, bush ranger, reformer, bank robber, police killer, and finally as his country's beloved Robin Hood.
My review: As the blurb says - Kelly speaks. Listen to him to understand something of the Australian soul, why for many he is a folk hero the same as Jesse Jackson was in the US. Kelly and the unofficial anthem 'Dancing Matilda' belong to the national consciousness of the OZ. I also see some parallels with Jean Valjean of Les Miserables fame/infame...
The setting is ofcourse Australia and will replace Collected Poems of Les Murray, the only book from Down - Under in the VBB which I've taken out. Another colonial writer as all mine are except for the Martell.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

INTERPRETER OF MALADIES by JHUMPA LAHIRI (India)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5511760
Entered by meexia
The author is US born of Bengali parents. This book is a collection of short stories about Indians in exile (9 in total). Winner of the Pulitzer prize 2000, PEN/Hemingway award, and New Yorker Prize for best first book.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: Guy Kennaway's delightful novel brilliantly evokes the unique culture of Jamaica and in particular the village of Angel Beach, a small tight-knit community where everybody has a say in everything, no dispute is too pretty, no relationship incosequential and there's no such thing as a secret. One People is one hilarious window into this world with no net curtains to obscure the view. It is a microcosm of life set to reggae beat.



Journal Entry 29 by wingSherlockfanwing from Upper Hutt, Wellington Province New Zealand on Thursday, July 10, 2008
Thanks very much franaloe.
Alas this has arrived at a very bad time for me. I am just about to depart for two months overseas and really do not have the time to participate so I will send it straight on to PokPok with its contents still totally inact.
Unfortunate alas but one of the prices we much pay for overseas travel!! I jest. We have our half-French grandson with us at present and will be returning him to his parents then spending time on holiday with the family in Brittany. Thanks for letting me participate. If anyone is short on a New Zealand book for their participation in the Around the World reading challenge please feel free to contact me AFTER 20 September.
I have currently a number of books by NZ authors on hand as I'm collecting them up for participation in the 2009 Anniversary BC Convention in Christchurch, NZ next April so I might be able to fill gaps for you.
Great idea and I hope it continues to do well.

Journal Entry 30 by wingerishkigalwing from Salt Lake City, Utah USA on Friday, July 11, 2008
This has passed very quickly to me~~It will likely be a week or so before I have the time to read thru what is in the box~~we're in the middle of my daughter's wedding week :o Needless to say it's a bit nuts around here. I will choose and add as soon as I possibly can

Journal Entry 31 by wingerishkigalwing from Salt Lake City, Utah USA on Sunday, July 27, 2008
Sorry I took so long. This has been an insane month for me, I have had a house full since July 1, and I've been lucky to get 10 min a day on the comuter. But I'm finally ready (once decided, I've been writing the journal in my word processor for days.
So,

This has been really tough to choose~~so many great-sounding books~~ I’ve finally whittled it down to three:
INTERPRETER OF MALADIES by JHUMPA LAHIRI (India)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5511760
Entered by meexia
-
THE TRUE HISTORY OF THE KELLY GANG BY PETER CAREY (AUSTRALIAN living in NY) - Author winner of Booker prize & Commonwealth Prize Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/974-6122449

THE LOST DAUGHTER OF HAPPINESS - GELING YAN (CHINA) Entered by Okyrhoe
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3478724

and in their place I’m leaving:

The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile

Ceremony
by Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo Nation

Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan

Notes on them/opening paragraphs to follow, in the extended post listing all now available. And I'll pm the current holders of the three I want asap.
katrinat, thank you for organizing this wonderful bookbox!! And thank you all for keeping this going with awesome additions!




Journal Entry 32 by wingerishkigalwing from Salt Lake City, Utah USA on Sunday, July 27, 2008
New composition:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: Guy Kennaway's delightful novel brilliantly evokes the unique culture of Jamaica and in particular the village of Angel Beach, a small tight-knit community where everybody has a say in everything, no dispute is too pretty, no relationship incosequential and there's no such thing as a secret. One People is one hilarious window into this world with no net curtains to obscure the view. It is a microcosm of life set to reggae beat.


The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile

I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice :) ]

#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die

Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”



Ceremony
by Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo Nation

very hard to include a first paragraph of this, so i’ve added a review. Incerdible book!! And while the Laguna Pueblo Nation is within the US, believe me, this will definately give you an itroduction to another culture.

From 500 Great Books by Women review by Prudence Hockley
Tayo is a half-white Laguna Indian emotionally stricken by white warfare and almost destroyed by his experiences as a World War II prisoner of the Japanese. Unable to find a place among Native American veterans who are losing themselves in rage and drunkenness, Tayo discovers his connection to the land and to ancient rituals with the help of a medicine man, and comes to understand the need to create ceremonies, to grow and change, in order to survive. He finds peace by "finally seeing the pattern, the way all the stories fit together -- the old stories, the war stories, their stories -- to become the story that was still being told." Ceremony is somber in tone, its narrative interspersed with fragments of myth, the writing imbued with the grace and resonance of a ceremonial chant. It powerfully evokes both a natural world alive with story and significance, and the brutal human world of Highway 66 and the streets of Gallup, where Navajos, Zunis, and Hopis in torn jackets stand outside bars "like cold flies stuck to the wall." Ceremony is deeply felt, but avoids glib mysticism; it is informed not by bitterness and racial animosity, but by a larger sense of sorrow and an awareness of "how much can be lost, how much can be forgotten." Tayo's spiritual healing becomes an offering of hope and redemption for tribal cultures.

Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan

“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune

Journal Entry 33 by Dove-i-Libri from Cape Coral, Florida USA on Monday, July 28, 2008
Hi! I rec'd the BCID for this Virtual BookBox today! I have requested this book from "franaloe:"

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
That leaves these books still available:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile
I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice]
#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”

Ceremony
by Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo Nation
Very hard to include a first paragraph of this, so i’ve added a review. Incerdible book!! And while the Laguna Pueblo Nation is within the US, believe me, this will definately give you an itroduction to another culture. ~~From 500 Great Books by Women review by Prudence Hockley:
Tayo is a half-white Laguna Indian emotionally stricken by white warfare and almost destroyed by his experiences as a World War II prisoner of the Japanese. Unable to find a place among Native American veterans who are losing themselves in rage and drunkenness, Tayo discovers his connection to the land and to ancient rituals with the help of a medicine man, and comes to understand the need to create ceremonies, to grow and change, in order to survive. He finds peace by "finally seeing the pattern, the way all the stories fit together -- the old stories, the war stories, their stories -- to become the story that was still being told." Ceremony is somber in tone, its narrative interspersed with fragments of myth, the writing imbued with the grace and resonance of a ceremonial chant. It powerfully evokes both a natural world alive with story and significance, and the brutal human world of Highway 66 and the streets of Gallup, where Navajos, Zunis, and Hopis in torn jackets stand outside bars "like cold flies stuck to the wall." Ceremony is deeply felt, but avoids glib mysticism; it is informed not by bitterness and racial animosity, but by a larger sense of sorrow and an awareness of "how much can be lost, how much can be forgotten." Tayo's spiritual healing becomes an offering of hope and redemption for tribal cultures.

Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan
“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
And I am adding this book:
Cromartie V. the God Shiva: Acting Through the Government of India (UK/India)
by Rumer Godden
Journal Entries Click Here
Entered into the VBB by BookCrosser Doveilibri
General Fiction Large Print Edition From Library Journal: "... The author of more than 60 books, Godden, now nearly 90, again weaves a complex tale, fraught with mystery and set both in London and on the Coromandel coast of India. Based on a real case, the story revolves around an ancient bronze statue of the Hindu god Shiva. When barrister Michael Dean is sent to India to research the statue's verisimilitude, he must decide whether this national treasure is real or a forgery. Woven in with issues of morality is the developing love of Michael for Artemis, a woman with a surprising "agenda." Godden's descriptions are airy and open, almost like detail in an impressionistic painting. Is reality largely in the eye of the beholder? What is the role of the gods? Readers who enjoy far-away cultures will find this tale a treat ..." -- Ellen R. Cohen, Rockville, Md. (Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Journal Entry 34 by Dove-i-Libri from Cape Coral, Florida USA on Monday, July 28, 2008
Copied below is the PM I sent to "Deadsteen" who is the next person on the list:

Hello Fellow NY-er! I'm living here in Florida, missing my NYC everyday! Just received the BCID for the "Around the World" Virtual Bookbox, have made my choice and added another book in, and now I'm sending the BCID along to you to make *YOUR* choice!

Here it is: 112-6153528

Please journal so we know you've rec'd the BCID! Thanks! Have fun, and Happy BookCrossing!

Journal Entry 35 by deadsteen from White Plains, New York USA on Wednesday, July 30, 2008
Received the email, will ponder this list for a day or two.

Journal Entry 36 by deadsteen from White Plains, New York USA on Tuesday, August 05, 2008
I have selected Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko from the bookbox. I have contacted Erishkigal to send the book on to me.

I am adding 2 books to the virtual bookbox (even though I only took out 1 book-- wouldn't mind moving an extra book around!)

No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe (Nigeria) http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4545218
Obi Okonkwo's foreign education has separated him from his African roots and made him part of a ruling elite whose corruption he finds repugnant. The agony of choosing between traditional values and the demands of a changing world is dramatized with unequaled clarity and poignancy. Thirty years after it was written, No Longer at Ease remains a brillinat statement of the challenge facing African society.

Small Island by Andrea Levy http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3555451 (I actually have a different copy of this book, so I will register it if somebody selects it)

I enjoyed this book very much--
Hortense Joseph arrives in London from Jamaica in 1948 with her life in her suitcase, her heart broken, her resolve intact. Her husband, Gilbert Joseph, returns from the war expecting to be received as a hero, but finds his status as a black man in Britain to be second class. His white landlady, Queenie, raised as a farmer's daughter, befriends Gilbert, and later Hortense, with innocence and courage, until the unexpected arrival of her husband, Bernard, who returns from combat with issues of his own to resolve. Told in these four voices, Small Island is a courageous novel of tender emotion and sparkling wit, of crossings taken and passages lost, of shattering compassion and of reckless optimism in the face of insurmountable barriers---in short, an encapsulation of that most American of experiences: the immigrant's life.


Journal Entry 37 by deadsteen from White Plains, New York USA on Tuesday, August 05, 2008
Here is the new composition of the bookbox:


WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: Guy Kennaway's delightful novel brilliantly evokes the unique culture of Jamaica and in particular the village of Angel Beach, a small tight-knit community where everybody has a say in everything, no dispute is too pretty, no relationship incosequential and there's no such thing as a secret. One People is one hilarious window into this world with no net curtains to obscure the view. It is a microcosm of life set to reggae beat.


The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile

I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice :) ]

#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die

“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”



Ceremony
by Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo Nation

very hard to include a first paragraph of this, so i’ve added a review. Incerdible book!! And while the Laguna Pueblo Nation is within the US, believe me, this will definately give you an itroduction to another culture.

From 500 Great Books by Women review by Prudence Hockley
Tayo is a half-white Laguna Indian emotionally stricken by white warfare and almost destroyed by his experiences as a World War II prisoner of the Japanese. Unable to find a place among Native American veterans who are losing themselves in rage and drunkenness, Tayo discovers his connection to the land and to ancient rituals with the help of a medicine man, and comes to understand the need to create ceremonies, to grow and change, in order to survive. He finds peace by "finally seeing the pattern, the way all the stories fit together -- the old stories, the war stories, their stories -- to become the story that was still being told." Ceremony is somber in tone, its narrative interspersed with fragments of myth, the writing imbued with the grace and resonance of a ceremonial chant. It powerfully evokes both a natural world alive with story and significance, and the brutal human world of Highway 66 and the streets of Gallup, where Navajos, Zunis, and Hopis in torn jackets stand outside bars "like cold flies stuck to the wall." Ceremony is deeply felt, but avoids glib mysticism; it is informed not by bitterness and racial animosity, but by a larger sense of sorrow and an awareness of "how much can be lost, how much can be forgotten." Tayo's spiritual healing becomes an offering of hope and redemption for tribal cultures.

Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan

“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune

back to top

Journal entry 33 by Members Plus details...DoveiLibriMembers Plus details... from Fort Myers, Florida USA on Monday, July 28, 2008

Hi! I rec'd the BCID for this Virtual BookBox today! I have requested this book from "franaloe:"

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
That leaves these books still available:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile
I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice]
#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”


Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan
“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
And I am adding this book:
Cromartie V. the God Shiva: Acting Through the Government of India (UK/India)
by Rumer Godden
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6142310
Entered into the VBB by BookCrosser Doveilibri
General Fiction Large Print Edition From Library Journal: "... The author of more than 60 books, Godden, now nearly 90, again weaves a complex tale, fraught with mystery and set both in London and on the Coromandel coast of India. Based on a real case, the story revolves around an ancient bronze statue of the Hindu god Shiva. When barrister Michael Dean is sent to India to research the statue's verisimilitude, he must decide whether this national treasure is real or a forgery. Woven in with issues of morality is the developing love of Michael for Artemis, a woman with a surprising "agenda." Godden's descriptions are airy and open, almost like detail in an impressionistic painting. Is reality largely in the eye of the beholder? What is the role of the gods? Readers who enjoy far-away cultures will find this tale a treat ..." -- Ellen R. Cohen, Rockville, Md. (Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe (Nigeria) http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4545218
Obi Okonkwo's foreign education has separated him from his African roots and made him part of a ruling elite whose corruption he finds repugnant. The agony of choosing between traditional values and the demands of a changing world is dramatized with unequaled clarity and poignancy. Thirty years after it was written, No Longer at Ease remains a brillinat statement of the challenge facing African society.

Small Island by Andrea Levy http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3555451 (I actually have a different copy of this book, so I will register it if somebody selects it) England and Jamaica

I enjoyed this book very much--
Hortense Joseph arrives in London from Jamaica in 1948 with her life in her suitcase, her heart broken, her resolve intact. Her husband, Gilbert Joseph, returns from the war expecting to be received as a hero, but finds his status as a black man in Britain to be second class. His white landlady, Queenie, raised as a farmer's daughter, befriends Gilbert, and later Hortense, with innocence and courage, until the unexpected arrival of her husband, Bernard, who returns from combat with issues of his own to resolve. Told in these four voices, Small Island is a courageous novel of tender emotion and sparkling wit, of crossings taken and passages lost, of shattering compassion and of reckless optimism in the face of insurmountable barriers---in short, an encapsulation of that most American of experiences: the immigrant's life.

Journal Entry 38 by deadsteen from White Plains, New York USA on Tuesday, August 05, 2008
Here is the new composition of the bookbox:


WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: Guy Kennaway's delightful novel brilliantly evokes the unique culture of Jamaica and in particular the village of Angel Beach, a small tight-knit community where everybody has a say in everything, no dispute is too pretty, no relationship incosequential and there's no such thing as a secret. One People is one hilarious window into this world with no net curtains to obscure the view. It is a microcosm of life set to reggae beat.


The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile

I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice :) ]

#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die

“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”



Ceremony
by Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo Nation

very hard to include a first paragraph of this, so i’ve added a review. Incerdible book!! And while the Laguna Pueblo Nation is within the US, believe me, this will definately give you an itroduction to another culture.

From 500 Great Books by Women review by Prudence Hockley
Tayo is a half-white Laguna Indian emotionally stricken by white warfare and almost destroyed by his experiences as a World War II prisoner of the Japanese. Unable to find a place among Native American veterans who are losing themselves in rage and drunkenness, Tayo discovers his connection to the land and to ancient rituals with the help of a medicine man, and comes to understand the need to create ceremonies, to grow and change, in order to survive. He finds peace by "finally seeing the pattern, the way all the stories fit together -- the old stories, the war stories, their stories -- to become the story that was still being told." Ceremony is somber in tone, its narrative interspersed with fragments of myth, the writing imbued with the grace and resonance of a ceremonial chant. It powerfully evokes both a natural world alive with story and significance, and the brutal human world of Highway 66 and the streets of Gallup, where Navajos, Zunis, and Hopis in torn jackets stand outside bars "like cold flies stuck to the wall." Ceremony is deeply felt, but avoids glib mysticism; it is informed not by bitterness and racial animosity, but by a larger sense of sorrow and an awareness of "how much can be lost, how much can be forgotten." Tayo's spiritual healing becomes an offering of hope and redemption for tribal cultures.

Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan

“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune

back to top

Journal entry 33 by Members Plus details...DoveiLibriMembers Plus details... from Fort Myers, Florida USA on Monday, July 28, 2008

Hi! I rec'd the BCID for this Virtual BookBox today! I have requested this book from "franaloe:"

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
That leaves these books still available:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile
I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice]
#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”


Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan
“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
And I am adding this book:
Cromartie V. the God Shiva: Acting Through the Government of India (UK/India)
by Rumer Godden
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6142310
Entered into the VBB by BookCrosser Doveilibri
General Fiction Large Print Edition From Library Journal: "... The author of more than 60 books, Godden, now nearly 90, again weaves a complex tale, fraught with mystery and set both in London and on the Coromandel coast of India. Based on a real case, the story revolves around an ancient bronze statue of the Hindu god Shiva. When barrister Michael Dean is sent to India to research the statue's verisimilitude, he must decide whether this national treasure is real or a forgery. Woven in with issues of morality is the developing love of Michael for Artemis, a woman with a surprising "agenda." Godden's descriptions are airy and open, almost like detail in an impressionistic painting. Is reality largely in the eye of the beholder? What is the role of the gods? Readers who enjoy far-away cultures will find this tale a treat ..." -- Ellen R. Cohen, Rockville, Md. (Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe (Nigeria) http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4545218
Obi Okonkwo's foreign education has separated him from his African roots and made him part of a ruling elite whose corruption he finds repugnant. The agony of choosing between traditional values and the demands of a changing world is dramatized with unequaled clarity and poignancy. Thirty years after it was written, No Longer at Ease remains a brillinat statement of the challenge facing African society.

Small Island by Andrea Levy http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3555451 (I actually have a different copy of this book, so I will register it if somebody selects it) England and Jamaica

I enjoyed this book very much--
Hortense Joseph arrives in London from Jamaica in 1948 with her life in her suitcase, her heart broken, her resolve intact. Her husband, Gilbert Joseph, returns from the war expecting to be received as a hero, but finds his status as a black man in Britain to be second class. His white landlady, Queenie, raised as a farmer's daughter, befriends Gilbert, and later Hortense, with innocence and courage, until the unexpected arrival of her husband, Bernard, who returns from combat with issues of his own to resolve. Told in these four voices, Small Island is a courageous novel of tender emotion and sparkling wit, of crossings taken and passages lost, of shattering compassion and of reckless optimism in the face of insurmountable barriers---in short, an encapsulation of that most American of experiences: the immigrant's life.

Journal Entry 39 by deadsteen from White Plains, New York USA on Tuesday, August 05, 2008
Here is the new composition of the bookbox:


WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: Guy Kennaway's delightful novel brilliantly evokes the unique culture of Jamaica and in particular the village of Angel Beach, a small tight-knit community where everybody has a say in everything, no dispute is too pretty, no relationship incosequential and there's no such thing as a secret. One People is one hilarious window into this world with no net curtains to obscure the view. It is a microcosm of life set to reggae beat.


The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile

I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice :) ]

#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die

“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”



Ceremony
by Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo Nation

very hard to include a first paragraph of this, so i’ve added a review. Incerdible book!! And while the Laguna Pueblo Nation is within the US, believe me, this will definately give you an itroduction to another culture.

From 500 Great Books by Women review by Prudence Hockley
Tayo is a half-white Laguna Indian emotionally stricken by white warfare and almost destroyed by his experiences as a World War II prisoner of the Japanese. Unable to find a place among Native American veterans who are losing themselves in rage and drunkenness, Tayo discovers his connection to the land and to ancient rituals with the help of a medicine man, and comes to understand the need to create ceremonies, to grow and change, in order to survive. He finds peace by "finally seeing the pattern, the way all the stories fit together -- the old stories, the war stories, their stories -- to become the story that was still being told." Ceremony is somber in tone, its narrative interspersed with fragments of myth, the writing imbued with the grace and resonance of a ceremonial chant. It powerfully evokes both a natural world alive with story and significance, and the brutal human world of Highway 66 and the streets of Gallup, where Navajos, Zunis, and Hopis in torn jackets stand outside bars "like cold flies stuck to the wall." Ceremony is deeply felt, but avoids glib mysticism; it is informed not by bitterness and racial animosity, but by a larger sense of sorrow and an awareness of "how much can be lost, how much can be forgotten." Tayo's spiritual healing becomes an offering of hope and redemption for tribal cultures.

Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan

“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune

back to top

Journal entry 33 by Members Plus details...DoveiLibriMembers Plus details... from Fort Myers, Florida USA on Monday, July 28, 2008

Hi! I rec'd the BCID for this Virtual BookBox today! I have requested this book from "franaloe:"

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
That leaves these books still available:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile
I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice]
#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”


Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan
“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
And I am adding this book:
Cromartie V. the God Shiva: Acting Through the Government of India (UK/India)
by Rumer Godden
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6142310
Entered into the VBB by BookCrosser Doveilibri
General Fiction Large Print Edition From Library Journal: "... The author of more than 60 books, Godden, now nearly 90, again weaves a complex tale, fraught with mystery and set both in London and on the Coromandel coast of India. Based on a real case, the story revolves around an ancient bronze statue of the Hindu god Shiva. When barrister Michael Dean is sent to India to research the statue's verisimilitude, he must decide whether this national treasure is real or a forgery. Woven in with issues of morality is the developing love of Michael for Artemis, a woman with a surprising "agenda." Godden's descriptions are airy and open, almost like detail in an impressionistic painting. Is reality largely in the eye of the beholder? What is the role of the gods? Readers who enjoy far-away cultures will find this tale a treat ..." -- Ellen R. Cohen, Rockville, Md. (Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe (Nigeria) http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4545218 Entered by deadsteen
Obi Okonkwo's foreign education has separated him from his African roots and made him part of a ruling elite whose corruption he finds repugnant. The agony of choosing between traditional values and the demands of a changing world is dramatized with unequaled clarity and poignancy. Thirty years after it was written, No Longer at Ease remains a brillinat statement of the challenge facing African society.

Small Island by Andrea Levy http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3555451 (I actually have a different copy of this book, so I will register it if somebody selects it) England and Jamaica Entered by deadsteen

I enjoyed this book very much--
Hortense Joseph arrives in London from Jamaica in 1948 with her life in her suitcase, her heart broken, her resolve intact. Her husband, Gilbert Joseph, returns from the war expecting to be received as a hero, but finds his status as a black man in Britain to be second class. His white landlady, Queenie, raised as a farmer's daughter, befriends Gilbert, and later Hortense, with innocence and courage, until the unexpected arrival of her husband, Bernard, who returns from combat with issues of his own to resolve. Told in these four voices, Small Island is a courageous novel of tender emotion and sparkling wit, of crossings taken and passages lost, of shattering compassion and of reckless optimism in the face of insurmountable barriers---in short, an encapsulation of that most American of experiences: the immigrant's life.

Journal Entry 40 by deadsteen from White Plains, New York USA on Tuesday, August 05, 2008
Here is the new composition of the bookbox:


WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: Guy Kennaway's delightful novel brilliantly evokes the unique culture of Jamaica and in particular the village of Angel Beach, a small tight-knit community where everybody has a say in everything, no dispute is too pretty, no relationship incosequential and there's no such thing as a secret. One People is one hilarious window into this world with no net curtains to obscure the view. It is a microcosm of life set to reggae beat.


The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile

I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice :) ]

#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die

“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”



Ceremony
by Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo Nation

very hard to include a first paragraph of this, so i’ve added a review. Incerdible book!! And while the Laguna Pueblo Nation is within the US, believe me, this will definately give you an itroduction to another culture.

From 500 Great Books by Women review by Prudence Hockley
Tayo is a half-white Laguna Indian emotionally stricken by white warfare and almost destroyed by his experiences as a World War II prisoner of the Japanese. Unable to find a place among Native American veterans who are losing themselves in rage and drunkenness, Tayo discovers his connection to the land and to ancient rituals with the help of a medicine man, and comes to understand the need to create ceremonies, to grow and change, in order to survive. He finds peace by "finally seeing the pattern, the way all the stories fit together -- the old stories, the war stories, their stories -- to become the story that was still being told." Ceremony is somber in tone, its narrative interspersed with fragments of myth, the writing imbued with the grace and resonance of a ceremonial chant. It powerfully evokes both a natural world alive with story and significance, and the brutal human world of Highway 66 and the streets of Gallup, where Navajos, Zunis, and Hopis in torn jackets stand outside bars "like cold flies stuck to the wall." Ceremony is deeply felt, but avoids glib mysticism; it is informed not by bitterness and racial animosity, but by a larger sense of sorrow and an awareness of "how much can be lost, how much can be forgotten." Tayo's spiritual healing becomes an offering of hope and redemption for tribal cultures.

Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan

“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune

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Journal entry 33 by Members Plus details...DoveiLibriMembers Plus details... from Fort Myers, Florida USA on Monday, July 28, 2008

Hi! I rec'd the BCID for this Virtual BookBox today! I have requested this book from "franaloe:"

ONE PEOPLE by GUY KENNAWAY (UK/JAMAICA)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260514
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
That leaves these books still available:

WATER FROM THE SUN and DISCOVERING JAPAN - BRE EASTON ELLIS (AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6115481/
This is a tiny little book featuring 2 short stories:
From the blurb: "Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage has broken down. She has moved in with a boy half her age, who is more interested in young boys than in her. To keep afloat she drinks, shops and takes pills."

DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE - ISABEL ALLENDE (PERU/SOUTH AMERICA) Entered by katrinat
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153458/
First paragraph: "Everyone is born with some special talent and Eliza Sommers discovered early on that she had two: a good sense of smell and a good memory. She used the first to earn a living and the second to recall her life - if not in precise detail, at least with an astrologers poetic vagueness..."

THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS - YANN MARTEL (SPAIN) Entered by katrinat http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6153469
From the Blurb: "Dealing with such themes as storytelling and illness, death and bureaucracy, memory and material objects, these tales are thought provoking, as inventive in form as they are timeless in context. They display the startling mix of dazzle and depth that have made Martel an international phenomenon."

THE ENGLISH PATIENT - MICHAEL ONDAATJE (CANADIAN OF MIXED EURASIAN HERITAGE BORN IN SRI LANKA) - The book of the film - winner Booker prize & many others Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/592-6082351
Blurb: "With ravishing beauty and unsettling intelligence...traces the intersection of four damaged lives, in an Italian villa, at the end of WWII"
My review: Damaged lives in a damaged mansion in a damaged country in a damaged continent in a damaged world, where the story ends with Hiroshima & Nagasaki, and yet nevertheless shines with utter beauty and translucense of what the human condition is capable of. A book for the soul and the mind and the senses, moving through the landscapes of Italy & deserts of Africa touching South east England, Canada & India in the memories of its characters. The protoganists, Caravaggio and Hana we have met already in his earlier novel 'In the skin of a lion' set in Toronto dealing with themes of immigration, identity, separation & belonging or not. English Patient is in a way its sequel, and we find here what happened to its' protoganist Patrick Lewis .

LIFE OF PI - YANN MARTEL (Spanish) Booker Prize winner Entered by kotus123
http://www.bookcrossing.com/272-6221775
Blurb: After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, one solitary lifeboat remains bobbling on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen year old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orang utang...and a 450 pound Royal Bengal tiger.
The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary works of fiction in recent years.
My review: Pi is a young Indian boy who was on the way to Canada with his family and their entire private zoo, to begin a new life as immigrants, hoping to make a living doing what they knew best - running a zoo. The story is ofcourse a parable, not the easiest read, but un-put-downable, and not later, absolutely not forgotten. Its a story of courage, sheer determination against absolutely insurmounatable odds, and the beauty of our universe that somehow in her many faced ways, makes us go on ...
Setting is mainly the Pacific Ocean, flashes in India, deserted Pacific/ Carrebean island, and Canada.
I also thought that someone might like to make a pair of it together with the other Yann martel in the VBB, thats what I wanted to do ;) as thats the only way to really get to know an author - but even I know there has to be a limit LOL! And I'm planning a hardback collection of these modern classics.

THE TERMINAL MAN by ALFRED MEHRAN AND ANDREW DONKIN (Stateless)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6078895
Entered by klaradyn
The extraordinary true story of the charming eccentric Sir Alfred Mehran who has spent the last 15 years living on a bench in Terminal 1 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris and dining on MacDonalds every day - the strangest case in immigration history!

A TIME OF ANGELS by PATRICIA SCHONSTEIN (South Africa)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6120337
Entered by klaradyn
Soothsayer and clairvoyant Primo Verona has such a strong gift for the supernatural that he was able to predict his own mother's death when he was still in the womb. But he needs all of his powers now because Lucifer has come to pay a visit and the stories of man must live on somehow.

THE EMPRESS OF SOUTH AMERICA by NIGEL CAWTHORNE (Nonfiction set mainly in Paraguay)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/5119871
Entered by klaradyn
Born in Ireland in the 1840's, Eliza Lynch left the country as a young girl, fleeing the potato famine with her parents. As a young woman, she became one of Paris most celebrated courtesans, until she was persuaded by the son of the dictator of Paraguay, to leave Paris for South America, where he promised he would make her Empress of the entire continent.

THE ISLAND OF THE DAY BEFORE by UMBERTO ECO (Italy)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6260517
Entered by franaloe
Blurb: The year is 1643. Roberto, a young nobleman, survives war, the Bastille, exile and shipwreck as he voyages to a Pacific island straddling the date meridian. There he waits now, alone on the mysteriously deserted Daphne, separated by treacherous reefs from the island beyond: the island of the day before. If he could read it, time - and his misfortunes - might be reversed. But first he must learn to swim...

The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende, Chile
I wasn’t sure whether of not to include this one as there is already an Allende in the mix, so I pm’d k to ask. [glad you liked this choice]
#67 on ALA's Banned Booklist
#276 on the 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
“Barrabas came to us by sea,the child Clara wrote in her delicate calligraphy. She was already in the habit of writing down important matters, and afterward, when she was mute, she also recorded trivialities, never suspecting that fifty years later I would her notebooks to reclaim the past and overcome terrors of my own.”


Season of Migration to The North by Tayeb Salih, Sudan
“It was, gentlemen, after a long absence--seven years to be exact, during which time I was studying in Europe--that I returned to my people. I learnt much, and much passed me by- but that’s another story. The important thing is that I returned with a great yearning for my people in that small village at the bend of the Nile.”

From Publishers Weekly
One of the classic themes followed in this complex novel, translated from the Arabic, is cultural dissonance between East and West, particularly the experience of a returned native.

A beautifully constructed novel by an author whose reputation in Arabic is deservedly vast. --London Tribune
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
And I am adding this book:
Cromartie V. the God Shiva: Acting Through the Government of India (UK/India)
by Rumer Godden
http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/6142310
Entered into the VBB by BookCrosser Doveilibri
General Fiction Large Print Edition From Library Journal: "... The author of more than 60 books, Godden, now nearly 90, again weaves a complex tale, fraught with mystery and set both in London and on the Coromandel coast of India. Based on a real case, the story revolves around an ancient bronze statue of the Hindu god Shiva. When barrister Michael Dean is sent to India to research the statue's verisimilitude, he must decide whether this national treasure is real or a forgery. Woven in with issues of morality is the developing love of Michael for Artemis, a woman with a surprising "agenda." Godden's descriptions are airy and open, almost like detail in an impressionistic painting. Is reality largely in the eye of the beholder? What is the role of the gods? Readers who enjoy far-away cultures will find this tale a treat ..." -- Ellen R. Cohen, Rockville, Md. (Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

No Longer at Ease by Chinua Achebe (Nigeria) http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/4545218 Entered by deadsteen
Obi Okonkwo's foreign education has separated him from his African roots and made him part of a ruling elite whose corruption he finds repugnant. The agony of choosing between traditional values and the demands of a changing world is dramatized with unequaled clarity and poignancy. Thirty years after it was written, No Longer at Ease remains a brillinat statement of the challenge facing African society.

Small Island by Andrea Levy http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/3555451 (I actually have a different copy of this book, so I will register it if somebody selects it) England and Jamaica Entered by deadsteen

I enjoyed this book very much--
Hortense Joseph arrives in London from Jamaica in 1948 with her life in her suitcase, her heart broken, her resolve intact. Her husband, Gilbert Joseph, returns from the war expecting to be received as a hero, but finds his status as a black man in Britain to be second class. His white landlady, Queenie, raised as a farmer's daughter, befriends Gilbert, and later Hortense, with innocence and courage, until the unexpected arrival of her husband, Bernard, who returns from combat with issues of his own to resolve. Told in these four voices, Small Island is a courageous novel of tender emotion and sparkling wit, of crossings taken and passages lost, of shattering compassion and of reckless optimism in the face of insurmountable barriers---in short, an encapsulation of that most American of experiences: the immigrant's life.

Journal Entry 41 by loveamystery from Vancouver, British Columbia Canada on Thursday, August 14, 2008
I received this bookbox today by e-mail message. Wow! So many great books!

Journal Entry 42 by katrinat from Southend-on-Sea, Essex United Kingdom on Sunday, September 07, 2008
Loveamystery has had this box reserved for quite a while now, I have pm'd her/him? on 2 seperate occassions to see if they are going to requests books and add books and had no reply, so I have made my picks from the box, as I would like to get this round finished and the next up and running in the next few months - possibly November now.

I had fun looking at the books left in the box, several of which I have already read. I generally picked books which would help me with the Olympic Challenge (http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/6/5665463/11) which I am aiming to complete for London 2012, the link above is for people wishing to challenge themselves for this challenge. I also took out an Isabel Allende book as it has been on my wishlist for ages.

I took out:
The Empress of South America put in by Klaradyn
House of Spirits and Migration to the North entered by Erishkigal
and No Longer at Ease put in by Deadsteen


I'll be aiming to start the bookbox with around 10 books next time, so I need to get my reading hat on!

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