The Plague (Essential.penguin)

by Albert Camus | Literature & Fiction |
ISBN: 9780140278514 Global Overview for this book
Registered by marko167 of Sant Pere de Ribes, Barcelona Spain on 3/11/2008
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7 journalers for this copy...
Journal Entry 1 by marko167 from Sant Pere de Ribes, Barcelona Spain on Tuesday, March 11, 2008
Book 2 of the The Nobel Spiral.

Fabulous book!

This for me wasn't an easy read, at times it felt over long and laborious but think this was Camus using his skill to help the reader experience some of the enuii of being caught in the Plague experience. I was surprised how much I sympathized with the characters in the concluding chapters.

The story itself could be taken on a very basic level but reading it I felt constantly drawn to draw comparisons with the experiences Camus would have had as a resistance fighter in france under the Nazis. I feel that his ending certainly makes us wonder whether the plague was a disease of the soul or the body. Perhaps both, but I err to the side of the soul. I would love to discuss this in more detail and will recommend it to my reading groups but am avoiding too many spoilers.

Finally, I want to discuss the 'piece de la resistance' of the novel. It was chapter 6 of part 4 of the novel. Tarrou's unburdening of himself is near as a perfect way to say what I feel about the subject of capital punishment and the campaigning I do on this subject. For these mere 13 pages I would have given the Nobel to Camus without a second thought. As though he had looked inside my heart and written what he saw.

Bravo!

Journal Entry 2 by marko167 at The Nobel Spiral in Book Spiral, Book Spiral -- Controlled Releases on Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Released 11 yrs ago (3/12/2008 UTC) at The Nobel Spiral in Book Spiral, Book Spiral -- Controlled Releases

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Off it flies to geetheflea with apologies for the delay.

Journal Entry 3 by geetheflea from London, Greater London United Kingdom on Tuesday, March 18, 2008
Wonderful! I really enjoy receiving these nobel books. Haven't read any Camus though have always meant to so looking forward to starting this. Thanks again marko167.

Journal Entry 4 by geetheflea from London, Greater London United Kingdom on Tuesday, April 08, 2008
I thought the book was thought provoking and well written but maybe could have been edited a little as I found my mind wondering about two thirds of the way through the book. Maybe this is because I felt that Camus was re-iterating the similar themes and labouring the point somewhat.

Have heard 'The Outsider' is a good read so will definitely read that know I know I like Camus' style.

One passage I particularly liked for the last sentence:
'...then gradually the rats began to appear again in numbers that went on increasing throughout the day. People out at night would often feel underfoot the squelchy roundness of a still warm body. It was as if the earth on which our houses stood were being purged of its secreted humours - thrusting up to the surface the abscesses and pus-clots that had been forming in its entrails.'

Released 10 yrs ago (4/9/2008 UTC) at The Nobel Spiral in Book Spiral, Book Spiral -- Controlled Releases

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Off to Brunton11!

Journal Entry 6 by wingbrunton11wing from Chester, Cheshire United Kingdom on Friday, April 11, 2008
Received today :)

Journal Entry 7 by wingbrunton11wing from Chester, Cheshire United Kingdom on Tuesday, May 20, 2008
Firstly apologies for having this book a little bit longer than planned - The curse of too many bookrings at once struck again!

I was pleasantly surprised at how accessible this book was and found it a fascinating read. The first 50 pages or so set the scene so well that I wondered where on earth Camus would go with the remaining 250 or so. I wasn't disappointed and really enjoyed this book. I can see why it is included in the 1001 books to read before you die list.

Thanks marko for introducing me to an author I probably wouldn't have chosen to read myself. I have katrinat's address and will get this book off to the post office tomorrow.

Journal Entry 8 by katrinat from Southend-on-Sea, Essex United Kingdom on Thursday, May 22, 2008
Arrived today, will try and read it next week

Journal Entry 9 by katrinat at BookRay in -- controlled release --, Bruxelles / Brussel Belgium on Friday, June 06, 2008

Released 10 yrs ago (6/6/2008 UTC) at BookRay in -- controlled release --, Bruxelles / Brussel Belgium

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sent in the post

Journal Entry 10 by katrinat from Southend-on-Sea, Essex United Kingdom on Friday, June 06, 2008
This novel is based around a small Algerian city in which a plague gradually develops leaving the inhabitants of the city prisoners in the town. The book focuses primarily on small group of doctors and their friends who are working on the cure of the plague, attending the sick and dying and also who are asked to help in the regulations of the city.

I expected this novel to have more of an effect on me, to be more powerful and shocking. If I hadn't been reading it for a bookring I don't know if I would have carried on reading it. I'm not saying it was poorly written, just not as gripping as it could have been.

Journal Entry 11 by iliotropio from Bruxelles / Brussel, Bruxelles / Brussel Belgium on Tuesday, June 10, 2008
The 2nd book of the Nobel Spiral is now in Brussels.
Many thanks katrinat!

Journal Entry 12 by iliotropio from Bruxelles / Brussel, Bruxelles / Brussel Belgium on Friday, August 01, 2008
"...for lack of time and thinking, people have to love each other without knowing much about it"
"Stupidity has a knack of getting its way; as we should see if we were not always so much wrapped up in ourselves."
"...since a dead man has no substance unless one has actually seen him dead, a hundred million corpses broadcast through history are no more than a puff of smoke in the imagination"
"...they came to know the incorrigible sorrow of all prisoners and exiles, which is to live in company with a memory that serves no purpose"
"...that bitter sense of freedom which comes of total deprivation"
"The evil that is in the world always comes of ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence, if they lack understanding. On the whole men are more good than bad; that, however, is not the real point. But they are more or less ignorant, and it is this that we call vice or virtue; the most incorrigible vice being that of an ignorance which fancies it knows everything and therefore claims for itself the right to kill. The soul of the murderer is blind, and there can be no true goodness nor true love without the utmost clearsightedness"
Next stop: afraberg

Journal Entry 13 by afraberg from Amsterdam, Noord-Holland Netherlands on Friday, August 08, 2008
Arrived today. Thank you very much for sending iliotropio!
I've two other ringbooks I need to read first, this one has to wait a week or two.


Journal Entry 14 by afraberg from Amsterdam, Noord-Holland Netherlands on Tuesday, September 02, 2008
I liked the book very much. Very good descriptions of the characters and their fears and emotions.
Thanks for sharing another great book Marko!

I've put the book in the mail to Fotomiep today.

Journal Entry 15 by fotomiep from Estrela, Lisboa (cidade) Portugal on Thursday, September 04, 2008
I received the book... Will read it ASAP (although I'm in a bit of a reading slump at the moment). Marsala has asked to be skipped for this one (she already has the book), so will send the book on to Moonwoolf when ready.

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