Wild Geese

by Ogai Mori | Literature & Fiction | This book has not been rated.
ISBN: 0804810702 Global Overview for this book
Registered by wingCandyDarlingwing of Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland on 12/21/2004
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2 journalers for this copy...
Journal Entry 1 by wingCandyDarlingwing from Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland on Tuesday, December 21, 2004
From Wikipedia:
Mori Ogai's classical novel, The Wild Geese or The Wild Goose (1911–13, 雁 Gan) was first published in serial form in Japan, and tells the story of unfulfilled love set against a background of social change. The story is set in 1880 Tokyo. The novel contains commentary on the changing situation between the Edo and Meiji periods. The characters of the novel are diverse, including not only students preparing for a privileged intellectual life and commoners who provide services to them, but also a pair of highly developed female characters. Mori sympathetically portrays the dilemmas and frustrations faced by women in this early period of Japan's modernization. The novel was filmed by Shiro Toyoda in 1953 as The Mistress (1953 film), starring Hideko Takamine as Otama.

Journal Entry 2 by wingCandyDarlingwing at Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland on Sunday, July 08, 2012

Released 6 yrs ago (7/10/2012 UTC) at Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland

CONTROLLED RELEASE NOTES:

Giving this book to a fellow bookcrosser. Hope you enjoy it!

Journal Entry 3 by LaPitchoune at Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland on Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Japanese delicacies.. YUMMY! Thanks, dear CandyD!

Journal Entry 4 by LaPitchoune at Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland on Saturday, May 25, 2013
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday. All these days in a flu, one book a day. This was Friday's book, the second book from Japan, the first one being The Temple of the Golden Pavilion. Together they made a nice combo.

This holds the status of a classic. A very simple story, yet warm in its narration. It is told from a distance, by a character who isn't the center of the events, but a mere bystander. Stereotypical gender roles: women can't move a muscle when a snake attacks, all they're ever good for is looking after the children or being someone's mistress.

This book reminded me about how time flies, like geese, one might add. Every day is described as repetition of the previous day. Doing housework, making tea, slowly gaining and losing interest in others, being forced to stay where you are, growing older by the day. Even Okada's walking route always follows the same old footprints. A trodden path - that's how life sometimes is. Not all geese can fly away and even leaving the house might seem insurmountable at times (such as fever and flu!). Thanks for sharing!

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