The Memory Police

by Yoko Ogawa | Science Fiction & Fantasy |
ISBN: 147352069X Global Overview for this book
Registered by wingPoodlesisterwing of Walthamstow, Greater London United Kingdom on 1/18/2021
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2 journalers for this copy...
Journal Entry 1 by wingPoodlesisterwing from Walthamstow, Greater London United Kingdom on Monday, January 18, 2021
Bought in Waterstones for my book group

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Released 1 mo ago (1/18/2021 UTC) at RABCK (Royal Mail), -- By post or by hand/ in person -- United Kingdom

CONTROLLED RELEASE NOTES:

A wishlist book going to ApoloniaX (Registering and releasing late as I forgot to before sending)

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Journal Entry 3 by wingApoloniaXwing at Prenzlauer Berg, Berlin Germany on Monday, January 18, 2021
Thanks a lot for this wishlist book!
I had added it to my wishlist when it made the International Booker Prize's longlist (and then the shortlist) - as I like to read dystopian fiction, and also enjoyed Ogawa's The Housekeeper and the Professor. Looking forward to reading it!

Journal Entry 4 by wingApoloniaXwing at Prenzlauer Berg, Berlin Germany on Sunday, January 24, 2021
A brilliant novel, dystopian magical realism I would call it - written in 1994 already, but translated into English only in 2019, and it promptly landed on the International Booker list. How memories can be the enemy of totalitarianism... Ribbons and roses, birds and boats, everything disappears, even their memories. Not for everybody though, but those are persecuted - and made disappear too, if they don't hide well. It made me think of all those many, many people finding hiding places in Nazi Germany, in cellars and attics, in back rooms hidden behind bookshelves or cupboards. But I think Ogawa's indirect focus might also have been on the discrimination of the hibakusha and how Japanese society tried to "forget" them until the 90s when the novel was written.

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