The Roman mysteries 3: The pirates of Pompeii

by Caroline Lawrence | Mystery & Thrillers |
ISBN: 1842550225 Global Overview for this book
Registered by Roobarb14 of Leeds, West Yorkshire United Kingdom on 9/7/2013
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2 journalers for this copy...
Journal Entry 1 by Roobarb14 from Leeds, West Yorkshire United Kingdom on Saturday, September 7, 2013
It is AD 79 and Mount Vesuvius has erupted, destroying Pompeii. Among the thousands of people huddled in refugee camps along the bay of Naples are Flavia Gemina and her friends, Jonathan the Jewish boy, Nubia the African slave-girl, and Lupus the mute beggar boy. When the friends discover that children are being kidnapped from the camps, they start to investigate and soon solve the mystery of the pirates of Pompeii.

Journal Entry 2 by Roobarb14 at BCUK Unconvention 2013 in Leeds, West Yorkshire United Kingdom on Friday, September 27, 2013

Released 9 yrs ago (9/27/2013 UTC) at BCUK Unconvention 2013 in Leeds, West Yorkshire United Kingdom

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Off to find a new reader!

Journal Entry 3 by PDB11 at Coalville, Leicestershire United Kingdom on Saturday, September 28, 2013
Found on the swaps table at the Unconvention. I look forward to reading this ... one day! My TBR mountain becomes daily less stable!

Journal Entry 4 by PDB11 at Coalville, Leicestershire United Kingdom on Monday, August 4, 2014
Historical mystery, in a period I know a little about!

There were some lovely ideas here. The refugee camp, the missing children. I thought we were going to encounter some sort of first-century mafioso, and I also rather liked the use of the Roman institution of patronage as a metaphor instead of the modern "godfather".

Instead, we followed the children as they found out something quite different. And Pulchra really needed that lesson in human relationships! My favourite character, though, was definitely Lupus, even though he reminded me a bit of (appropriately enough) Emma Bull's Wolf Boy.

Again, early on there were some splendid doubles entendres, which worked better in Latin than English, which meant I spotted them before the reader was meant to. Later, there were some really corny lightbulb jokes, transposed into the pre-electric age.

And right at the end, there was a glossary of ancient Roman terms (which I had to consult once or twice), complete with pronunciation guides for American English. Yuck.

For release soon.

Edit: I seem to be finding more of these books!
First in the series: The Thieves of Ostia
Book before this one: The Secrets of Vesuvius
Next book: The Assassins of Rome

Journal Entry 5 by PDB11 at Whitwick Road Surgery in Coalville, Leicestershire United Kingdom on Monday, August 4, 2014

Released 8 yrs ago (8/4/2014 UTC) at Whitwick Road Surgery in Coalville, Leicestershire United Kingdom

WILD RELEASE NOTES:

On a table in the waiting room, lower shelf.

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