What are you reading whilst practicing social distancing?

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Taking a virtual trip overseas?
Embarking on a workplace based drama to help you miss your co-workers less?
Finally plucked off the longest standing resident off your To Be Read mountain?

Share with us what you're reading whilst at home practicing social distancing, and also tell us why you chose it.

 

I'm currently reading "The Night Olivia Fell" by Christina McDonald which I purchased last month to fulfill a WishList Tag to member Spoiledrotten.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5873497

 

I started it a while ago and somehow got distracted with other books and never finished. I’ve gone back to it and will release it for an upcoming SSM, if I’m going out releasing at all at the end of the month.

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/566733

 

Working my way through Hugh Howey's Wool saga. It's a hefty read I haven't had time for until now.

 

Working my way through Hugh Howey's Wool saga. It's a hefty read I haven't had time for until now.


Ah, yes! I enjoyed that one (my comments on this bookring copy - but beware of spoilers: https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14388072/ . I'm a fan of reading catastrophe/apocalypse books during Difficult Times, and this one certainly counts!

 

I have that one on my pile also.

 

Here in NZ we're just hours away from a 4 week lockdown so I'll admit reading hasn't been on my mind. Once my parents manage to get back to their home (they have a special extension to get back to our island, flight leaving tomorrow), I will feel a little more at ease though I know I won't be able to see them (hard in itself as we usually have a meal with them once a week).
A few days ago I was two thirds of the way through 'The Best of Adam Sharp' by Graeme Simsion: https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15620476/ , a wishlist tag of last year from mattandmandy75. When I get back into it, I will go on to Spotify and listen to the soundtrack that goes with the book, while I read. Unless my wife picks up extra work before then, hopefully she'll enjoy the music too while I read.
Then comes the choosing of the next book. Anyone up for a Non-Facebook 24 hour read-a-thon set on a WEEK DAY?

 

I'm up for your readathon!

 

Eragon, by Christopher Paolini

 

but I refuse to allow it to influence my choice of reading :-)
I'm alternating two: The Familiars by Stacey Halls was an e-gift from my daughter on Mothering Sunday/Mother's Day, last Sunday in the UK, so it's overtaken all other TBRs. I recently enjoyed her very impressive second novel, The Foundling, so added her debut to my wish list. It's beautifully written but, as it's about the Pendle witches, it's intense and upsetting and I get too involved to read it for long without needing a break.
My alternative is The White Family by Maggie Gee which I chose because it fits plum's March reading theme. I have half a dozen suitable titles and have put them in alphabetical author order! There may not be enough days left in March to read them all . . .

 

My alternative is The White Family by Maggie Gee which I chose because it fits plum's March reading theme.

Not pleasant reading!
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15893988
The Dry by Jane Harper will be next, also chosen because it fits plum's March reading theme.

 

The Dry by Jane Harper will be next, also chosen because it fits plum's March reading theme.

I LOVE Jane Harper. I've read all three of her novels. I hope you enjoy "The Dry"!

 

The Dry by Jane Harper will be next, also chosen because it fits plum's March reading theme.

I LOVE Jane Harper. I've read all three of her novels. I hope you enjoy "The Dry"!

Yes, it's disappearing fast as I keep turning pages . . .

 

The Dry by Jane Harper will be next, also chosen because it fits plum's March reading theme.

I LOVE Jane Harper. I've read all three of her novels. I hope you enjoy "The Dry"!

Yes, it's disappearing fast as I keep turning pages . . .

And now they've all been turned! Didn't last long, I couldn't put it down!
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15894007

 

I love this series. Inspector Singh always brings a smile to my face :-)

 

I love this series. Inspector Singh always brings a smile to my face :-)

I didn't say why I chose it: like The Familiars that I finished a couple of days ago, it was part of the e-gift from my daughter on Mothering Sunday/Mother's Day, last Sunday in the UK, so it jumped well up the reading order. I could hardly put it down and have finished it already!

 

And now they've all been turned! Didn't last long, I couldn't put it down!
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15894007

So glad you enjoyed it, Nu-Knees!

 

And now they've all been turned! Didn't last long, I couldn't put it down!
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15894007

So glad you enjoyed it, Nu-Knees!

Yes, I did indeed!

 

The Familiars by Stacey Halls

Love the sound of this....I have just been online to purchase a copy for my Mum who lives in Lancashire, England.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5895595
Thank you for highlighting this one to me Nu-Knees!

I hope you enjoy The Dry by Jane Harper, it was one of my favorite reads of 2017.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5244173

 

The Familiars by Stacey Halls

Love the sound of this....I have just been online to purchase a copy for my Mum who lives in Lancashire, England.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5895595
Thank you for highlighting this one to me Nu-Knees!

You're welcome. I hope your mum is suitably impressed. It's certainly got me gripped!
I hope you enjoy The Dry by Jane Harper, it was one of my favorite reads of 2017.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5244173

Thank you again. Yes, I bought this copy when I saw it because I remembered seeing positive comments on BookTalk. Will be starting it tomorrow . . . Good night :-)

 

I hope you enjoy The Dry by Jane Harper, it was one of my favorite reads of 2017.
Thank you again. Yes, I bought this copy when I saw it because I remembered seeing positive comments on BookTalk. Will be starting it tomorrow . . .

And tomorrow is now today :-) As I understand it to be quite thrilling, and I'm not always very good with thrilling, I'm also starting a lighter novel to run alongside it: Bird Cottage by Eva Meijer, also chosen because it fits plum's March reading theme.

 

I'm also starting a lighter novel to run alongside it: Bird Cottage by Eva Meijer, also chosen because it fits plum's March reading theme.

Finished another one.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15896617

 

I got a copy of the Familiars from a LFL just before movements became restricted. Definitely at the top of my reading list!

 

I got a copy of the Familiars from a LFL just before movements became restricted. Definitely at the top of my reading list!

Well it has my strongest recommendation. I've just finished it. Amazing - and exhausting. I lived every minute!

 

I've got some good ones for taking me to another place:

Le Road Trip: A Traveler's Journal of Love and France ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15202569 ), by Vivian Swift; I've enjoyed her mix of personal-memoir/travel-journal/watercolor-art before, and this book's really enjoyable so far.

And I enjoy audiobooks, even when my driving is more limited than usual; might start listening while on walks since longer-distance road-trips are off the table. Current selection:

The Mirror and the Light ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15788832 ) by Hilary Mantel, the conclusion to the "Wolf Hall" trilogy; while I'm glad to be able to finish the story of Thomas Cromwell, this one's definitely on the darker side - even if I didn't know the historical outcome, the foreshadowings of impending doom are pretty heavy.

 

The Mirror and the Light
I have that on hold at the library, which, of course, is now closed, so I have no idea when I'll get to read it. :-(

Of course, I know how it ends.

 

In Florence, at 6:00 p.m. (noon my time), everyone will go out on their balconies or open their windows and read the opening verse:

Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra via
mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,
che la diritta via era smarrita

In the middle of our life's journey
I found myself in a dark wood,
The straight way was lost.

 

Sounds amazing. I’ve enjoyed seeing the videos online of singing from balconies even during these scary times.

 

In Florence, at 6:00 p.m. (noon my time), everyone will go out on their balconies or open their windows and read the opening verse:

Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra via
mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,
che la diritta via era smarrita

In the middle of our life's journey
I found myself in a dark wood,
The straight way was lost.


That's really beautiful!

 

How interesting!!

 

Most of these I really enjoyed and found that reading short stories helps with keeping your concentration.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14583882/

 

Most of these I really enjoyed and found that reading short stories helps with keeping your concentration.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14583882/

Yes! I was having a bit of trouble concentrating on reading and an anthology got me back in the groove. Now I have returned to my big brick of a novel, "The Shell Seekers" by Rosamunde Pilcher:
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11952602/

It's really good and keeping my interest despite its length.

 

The Shell Seekers is one of my all-time favorites. After reading it I practically binge-read everything else by Rosamunde Pilcher. Such a treat!

 

The Shell Seekers is one of my all-time favorites. After reading it I practically binge-read everything else by Rosamunde Pilcher. Such a treat!

Have you read anything by her son Robin who's been keeping her legacy going for a while?

 

Nonfiction and nothing to do with all this Corona virus situation.
I just needed something a bit different to my recent reads.
Deviate: The Creative Power of Transforming Your Perception by B. Lotto
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15193148/

 

As Marie curie said, nothing is to be feared, it is only to be understood. So I am attempting to understand better the ways great epidemics if the past have played out and shaped our world.

 

And I'm loving it.
It's funny, sad, and heartbreaking, but I do not want it to be over!

 

And I'm loving it.
It's funny, sad, and heartbreaking, but I do not want it to be over!

That book is SOOOOOOOO good!

 

I cannot wait to read a 2nd novel by Honeyman!

 

I also read Hilary Mantel's The Mirror & the Light these days, just started. (Brilliant, as expected.)
And Bernardine Evaristo's Girl, Woman, Other. (Love it)
And Miguel Torga's Tales and More Tales from the Mountain https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15561299/ Short stories. I normally don't like them that much, but these are excellent.
And 21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari. Non-fiction, Harari's next book after Sapiens and Homo Deus.

 

by Karen White. I love it so far.

 

So far a cute book.

 

since 6 am Tuesday morning (March 24th), after the country's second case was confirmed. I have piles of books to read, but at times concentrating is difficult, and I've found a great youtube channel that has a number of Ngaio Marsh and Georges Simenon books (Alleyn and Maigret, respectively). They are delightful, old-fashioned easy listening mysteries, perfect for while I'm doing work around the house, or as background to a jigsaw puzzle. At the moment I'm a third of the way into Hand in Glove by Ngaio Marsh.

Other than that, I've completed two books of short stories, Desire, a Vintage Minis book of Haruki Murakami tales, and Muriel Spark's The Portobello Road, here https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15776709

 

At the beginning of the year, I started a readathon of her books in publication order. I alternate them with other reading. I’m about to start The Murder at the Vicarage, having just finished Normal People by Sally Rooney (what a great book!).

 

I've recently acquired a collection of 50 of her short stories that I'm planning to intersperse with other things :-)

 

 

By coincidence I read in 2 books in January/February that speak to these pandemic times.

1. "Letters from the Earth" by Mark Twain
Twain's interesting thoughts about viruses, plagues, pandemics in regards to the human race.
&
2. "The Hot Zone" by Richard Preston https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7933737/

3. "The Library Book" Susan Orlean https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/371-15514774

4. "Marie-Therese" (of France) Bio. by Susan Nagel (currently reading)

 

Just today I decided I would have a morning reading ritual which consists of the following books:
Wisdom: 365 Thoughts from Indian Masters https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12534524
Grace for Each Moment
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13272694
The Scriptures
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15901616
Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody, The: Great Figures of History Hilariously Humbled
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14986086

I'm also currently reading:
Women Who Love Books Too Much: Bibliophiles, Bluestockings, and Prolific Pens from the Algonquin Hotel to the Ya-Ya Sisterhood
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6741320








 

by Lillian Hart.
This has been on my Kindle forever and seems like an easy read.

 

This is a delightful old book (1940) by Charles Lee; I found a copy of it, signed by the author, in a used bookstore in Quebec (I think it was) a few years ago. It has a chapter for each month, full of delightfully old-fashioned book trivia, lists and occasionally quotes, somehow related to that month. I've read January's a few times :) but this year decided to work through it - and as with everything going on I hadn't read March yet, I have been today. It references Walden: 'it was during the month of "stormy March" ' when Thoreau started cutting wood for his cabin. I thought I had a copy of Walden - turns out I don't, or I can't find it, but I did find one of his other books on my shelves, The Maine Woods, a hardback published in 1950 that's a compilation of several of his travels in that area, and began in on that.

 

"Mercy Point" by Anna Snoekstra
https://www.fantasticfiction.com/---/mercy-point.htm
YA Fantasy is certainly not my normal genre, but this is an author I am really enjoying of late.

 

This is a delightful old book (1940) by Charles Lee; I found a copy of it, signed by the author, in a used bookstore in Quebec (I think it was) a few years ago. It has a chapter for each month, full of delightfully old-fashioned book trivia, lists and occasionally quotes, somehow related to that month. I've read January's a few times :) but this year decided to work through it - and as with everything going on I hadn't read March yet, I have been today. It references Walden: 'it was during the month of "stormy March" ' when Thoreau started cutting wood for his cabin. I thought I had a copy of Walden - turns out I don't, or I can't find it, but I did find one of his other books on my shelves, The Maine Woods, a hardback published in 1950 that's a compilation of several of his travels in that area, and began in on that.

If you find yourself really hankering to read Walden, it is probably available as a free ebook online. I'm going to look up "The Maine Woods," as I hadn't heard of that one. Thanks and happy reading!

 

I read Walden years ago on audio. It was a great way to read it. I felt like I had actually met Thoreau and gotten to know him.

 

Lots of time to read right now. Hope you are all well. A few minutes ago I finished "Sisterland" by Curtis Sittenfeld, an interesting tale of identical twins. The book right before that was spectacular, "The Great Believers" by Rebecca Makkai. Currently on audio I'm in the middle of an amusing old sci-fi classic, "The Midwich Cuckoo" by John Wyndham.

 

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