Feb. 13-16: what are we reading in mid-February?

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I've started The Expedition ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14813404 ), a recent book about the tragic 1897 attempt to reach the North Pole by balloon; the author's personal fascination with the story really shines through.

 

wingbooklady331wing 9 mos ago
A few
1. The Last Fish Tale by Mark Kurlansky NF 12/29/11 [258 pages] -- I am 1/2 way through, but just pick up and read a little at a time

2. The Pearl of the Antilles by Andrea O'Reilly Herrera KTM 3/25/15 [357 pages] == 1/4 way through; not loving it but not hating it.

3. Bones of Betrayal by Jefferson Bass 12/29/11 [355 pages] -- an okay book

4. The Bone Tree by Greg Iles 12/29/16 [880 pages] -- just started listening to this on my phone.


ALL YEAR: Streams in the Desert by Mrs. Charles Cowman

 

in Greek... Alain Bombard was a biologist and doctor who believed that ship wrecks often resulted on so many deaths because even if people got them selves in a life boat, often poor psychology and a set of prejudices lead them to dehydration and starvation even after only a few days in the sea before getting rescued. He believed that man could survive on sea water and fish diet and in order to prove his theories, he set off to cross the Atlantic on 1952 on an inflatable boat, carrying no sweet water or significant provisions. He made the trip and wrote this book that got published next year, on 1953. Before, during and after the trip, Alain Bombard had some supporters, but mostly faced lots of doubt and ridicule from the press, general public and a good part of the academics of his time and some of his claims and specifics of this trip are still controversial today. Still, his experiences and beliefs helped to set some important techniques and rules of survival in case of an accident in the sea...
https://en.wikipedia.org/---/Alain_Bombard
I don't know how credible his account is and his writing style is a bit dry, but I'm half-way through the book and I find it interesting.

PS:
I see that book got published in English under the title "The Bombard Story" .

 

Sounds very interesting! I love shipwreck and "lost at sea" stories. I'll have to look for the english translation.

 

Not far in (13%) and not sure about it yet. There is a three year old who was quickly getting on my nerves, I like children being in a story but hate when they are written so preciously precocious.

 

I finished reading in two afternoons. It was quite interesting. Also on the after-notes there is some bitter information on how organizations and countries finally accepted to set strict rules on the survival methods and lifesaving boats onboard after decades of debating and arguing . Could you believe that for decades they claimed that in case of a shipwreck, half the passengers won't make it to the boats, so they didn't find necessary the expense to insure that everyone on a ship will have a seat on a life-saving boat in case of an accident... Money over human life, how sad!

 

Both episodic, for picking up and putting down, so I'm reading them in tandem - but one's definitely got way ahead of the other, being much easier to read!

The Last Word by Ben Macintyre, a collection of some of his columns in The Times on anything and everything relating to words! Fascinating!

The World of Samuel Pepys by Robert and Linnet Latham, extracts from the famous diary, organised by topic rather than chronologically.

I'm currently between novels!

 

I'm currently between novels!

I've now started The Crow Trap by Ann Cleeves, the first of her Vera novels, which I put next on the reading list several days ago after being impressed with her at an event in York library last week. I'd not read anything of hers before, I was only there because she was appearing with Louise Penny, and now don't know why I waited for long! She's an author I've been aware of for years but for some reason thought she was rather more gruesome than the cosies I usually go for :-)

 

I'm currently between novels!
I've now started The Crow Trap by Ann Cleeves, the first of her Vera novels, which I put next on the reading list several days ago after being impressed with her at an event in York library last week. I'd not read anything of hers before, I was only there because she was appearing with Louise Penny

At the same event I decided to reread the Gamache novels in order from the beginning - and am just about the start the second, Dead Cold by Louise Penny, which was also published as A Fatal Grace, I believe.

 

am just about the start the second, Dead Cold by Louise Penny, which was also published as A Fatal Grace, I believe.

Finished it. Wonderful! Just as gripping as a reread as it was the first time around!
Have requested the third in the series, The Cruellest Month, from the library but the county only has two copies, both out on loan at the moment, so I don't know when they'll get one of them to my local branch for me :-(

 

I've now started The Crow Trap by Ann Cleeves, the first of her Vera novels, which I put next on the reading list several days ago after being impressed with her at an event in York library last week.

Finished it. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Very impressed. Have already asked the county library service to bring their only copy of the second in the series to my local library!
My next novel on the Kindle will be much lighter, PS From Paris by Marc Levy - looks to be good weekend reading.

 

My next novel on the Kindle will be much lighter, PS From Paris by Marc Levy - looks to be good weekend reading.

It was, good weekend reading that is, just what I fancied on a weekend break near Scarborough :-)

 

The Last Word by Ben Macintyre, a collection of some of his columns in The Times on anything and everything relating to words! Fascinating!
The World of Samuel Pepys by Robert and Linnet Latham, extracts from the famous diary, organised by topic rather than chronologically.

I've finished the first so definitely need to concentrate on the second for a while :-)
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14895200

 

A so-so bio of Harriet Tubman, written for the YA audience. The writer is Canadian and made a name for herself in the Black History community here but I am finding the book a tad repetitive. Could have done with tighter editing. But I wanted to read more than the little bit I knew of Tubman and I picked this one up during the Word on the Street literary fair last September.

Also still reading, and really enjoying, *Forgiveness by Mark Sakamoto, one of the 5 shortlisted books for this year's Canada Reads competition. This one is really well-written and quite a story!

 

A so-so bio of Harriet Tubman, written for the YA audience. The writer is Canadian and made a name for herself in the Black History community here but I am finding the book a tad repetitive. Could have done with tighter editing. But I wanted to read more than the little bit I knew of Tubman and I picked this one up during the Word on the Street literary fair last September.


For an entertaining - and surprisingly informative, given the format - version of Tubman's life and work, check out the graphic novel from Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales series: https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13656262/

 

Thanks for that, Gory! I just did an online search at my library's website and there is only one in the system and it's an ebook. Somehow, I doubt ebook is the right format for a graphic novel. So I will check elsewhere

 

The long awaited new Tortall novel which is a prequel to the Immortals series.

Arram Draper--before he became the great Numair Salmalin--is a student at the Carthaki University for mages. He and his friends Varice and (later sworn enemy) Ozorne are bound by fate....and fated for danger.

 

Dark Witch by Nora Roberts

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12705345

 

A book about a teenager with a spinal injury.

 

I just finished it and need to figure out what to read next.

 

.

 

About the Edison/Westinghouse/Tesla patent wars and market competition. Its ok. Must finish by tomorrow for bookclub :-0

 

 

...so I'm moving my food-themed books onto the bedside TBR stack, starting with:

Drizzled With Death ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14871021/ ), a maple-sugar themed mystery with a mouthwatering stack of pancakes on the cover.

 

"The Nightingale Girls" by Donna Douglas : nurses to be during their training.
"Big little lies" by Liane Moriarty.

 

I'm reading a book called "Sister", it's a novel and I think the author is British because on every other page someone is "ringing" someone and there's "mum"...

 

=Flaubert's Parrot by Julian Barnes in Greek. I think I might have read this years ago, not sure. There seems to be a new hype about this author recently and many new editions of his older books are published again and again.
Let's see what I make out of this...

https://www.goodreads.com/---/2176.Flaubert_s_Parrot

 

A recommended cosy read for bedtime and reminiscent of Elizabeth Enright, Hilary McKay and Jeanne Birdsall.

 

by John Tingey
I received this as a birthday RABCK from bookstogive. It is an interesting book full of photos of the mail that W. Reginald Bray sent. He was an Englishman (1879-1939) who had a passion for sending extraordinary items through the mail. So far he's sent his dog and himself by mail, and sent mail using pictures for an address:) He always put his return address on everything so that he would get it back if the post office couldn't deliver it from his often convoluted instructions.

 

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14825860
Woot! 800+ pages completed! Great story, though!

and just started reading The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14829466/

 

In 1846 Ireland during the Irish Potato famine a girl befriends the daughter of the English lord who owns her family’s farm and they must keep their friendship a secret.

 

by Peter Hoeg. It is set in copenhagan, which I visited a long ago and enjoyed. I listened to a shortened audio tape of this some time ago and decided to read the long version.

 

by Maeve Binchy. Have not read a book by her in a long time. Really enjoying it.

 

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