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What Are You Reading January 30th & 31st?

I'm 50% into We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, which is a dystopian novel written in 1921... I've learned that this novel was the 1st banned book in Russia and that this novel was the direct nspiration for such works as:

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932)
Ayn Rand's Anthem (1938)
George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)
Kurt Vonnegut's Player Piano (1952)
Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed (1974)

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I'm 50% into We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, which is a dystopian novel written in 1921... I've learned that this novel was the 1st banned book in Russia and that this novel was the direct nspiration for such works as:

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932)
Ayn Rand's Anthem (1938)
George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)
Kurt Vonnegut's Player Piano (1952)
Ursula K. Le Guin's The Dispossessed (1974)
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I've just started Enmity by E J Andrews.

It's a dystopian novel written in 2014.
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Library paperback for at home reading: Death of an Elgin Marble by David Dickinson, one of his Lord Francis Powerscourt mysteries, more entertaining than mysterious!
On the Kindle for carrying around: I recently put Last Train to Istanbul by Ayse Kulin to one side to read something lighter, finishing the Irish tale yesterday afternoon. After spending another couple of chapters in WWII, I know I still need a lighter novel to alternate with it, so later today I'll try Once Upon a Time Travel by Sariah Wilson, which might be too light . . . .

Edited because I'd put a definite article where there isn't one!
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On the Kindle for carrying around: I recently put Last Train to Istanbul by Ayse Kulin to one side to read something lighter, finishing the Irish tale yesterday afternoon. After spending another couple of chapters in WWII, I know I still need a lighter novel to alternate with it, so later today I'll try Once Upon a Time Travel by Sariah Wilson, which might be too light . . . .

I made a concerted effort and finished Last Train to Istanbul by Ayse Kulin. I felt it deserved some time and attention, which I've now given it. Very good but not always easy reading!
As suspected, the Time Travel novel is very silly but I've only just started it and haven't yet decided whether the degree of silliness is entertaining or annoying :-) Could be either so far!
Edited because I'd put a definite article where there isn't one!
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Once Upon a Time Travel by Sariah Wilson
As suspected, the Time Travel novel is very silly but I've only just started it and haven't yet decided whether the degree of silliness is entertaining or annoying :-) Could be either so far!

It was both for a while, pretty much in equal measures, but then I met the witches and realised we were actually in Fantasyland, not Regency England, so it didn't need to make sense - and since then I've gone with the nonsensical flow . . . . Won't be repeating the Ms Wilson experience, though!
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By Vladimir Nabokov.
And it's so disturbing that I'm unsure if I really want to continue reading it. Humbert Humbert is a disgusting guy.
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I felt the same way. Don't know why I finished it but it is hard to believe that it stays on the 1001 books to read list.
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READING
1. The Last Fish Tale by Mark Kurlansky NF 12/29/11 [258 pages] -- started it last night; it is my evening read
2. Mornings on Horseback by David McCullough Audio/HB 1/4/07 [380 pages] -- I am listening to on my phone, but I have a hardback of the book; very interesting; I am going to see if my granddaughter would like it.

3. If You Lived Here, I'd Know Your Name by Heather Lende NF KTM8/3/17 [281 pages] -- this is my pick up, put down book. I am working hard to read down my books from other BCers this year.

ALL YEAR: Streams in the Desert by Mrs. Charles Cowman
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I think the lack of fiction would drive me bonkers. :) Kudos to you!
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Irena's Children by Tilar J. Mazzeo
Sizzling Sixteen by Janet Evanovich

I finished The Aviator's Wife by Melanie Benjamin about Anne Morrow Lindbergh. I have Anne's book Gifts From The Sea on my shelves that I have never read. Since I have her story fresh in my head I thought I'd go on and read her own words.
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I have Anne's book Gifts From The Sea on my shelves that I have never read. Since I have her story fresh in my head I thought I'd go on and read her own words.

I enjoyed that one!
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12289807/
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Gifts From The Sea on my shelves that I have never read. Since I have her story fresh in my head I thought I'd go on and read her own words.


One of my favorite books.
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Avenue of Mysteries by John Irving, so far, so good.
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the latest novel by popular Greek author Yiannis Xanthoulis . Many of his novels are awarded here in Greece and some of his books published in other languages, but the guy is very shy his self, there isn't even a wiki in English about him!
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Excellent!
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...so my choices of reading material range from the stack of food-and-wine books to the stack of bird-themed books to the head/shoulders/knees/toes books to... yeah. Kinda spoiled for choice here! In the queue at the moment:

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14880220/ ) is among my bedside-table reading - it's a funny, touching, and informative look behind the scenes at a Los Angeles crematory, and I'm enjoying it very much.

Buffalo Bird Woman's Garden ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14894760/ ) is about Native American agriculture - this one might go into this Indigenous Peoples bookbox ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/546986 ), or I might release it for the Backyard Bird Count challenge. Decisions, decisions...

My Dinner With Andrew ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14877497/ ) is a novelization of an episode of "Touched By An Angel," and the "dinner" theme makes it suitable for the Wine+Food challenge. It's also small enough to be a good carrying-around book.

On audio, The Jekyll Revelation ( https://www.audible.com/---/B01LXZKETW ) has me toggling between 19th-century London, Switzerland, and Samoa and modern-day Topanga Canyon, California, as the journals of Robert Louis Stevenson touch on (fictional) origins of his Jekyll/Hyde character. Since this is an MP3 download I don't have to worry about releasing it {wry grin}.

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