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Jan. 13-16: what are we reading in mid-January?

Bound and Gagged ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14866133 ), a history of the silent serials, including LOTS of photos, descriptions of the writing, filming, and promoting of the serials, and bios of the most notable actors.

Olympians: Zeus ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14871017 ), one of a series of graphic novels about the Greek pantheon.

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Bound and Gagged ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14866133/ ), a history of the silent serials, including LOTS of photos, descriptions of the writing, filming, and promoting of the serials, and bios of the most notable actors.

Olympians: Zeus ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14871017/ ), one of a series of graphic novels about the Greek pantheon.
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I started it this afternoon and doubt that I'll read anything else until I've finished it, a great start, seems like another superb story from the author of the wonderful Harold Fry/Queenie Hennessey novels.
My current nonfiction is Everybody's Daughter, Nobody's Child by Jane Lapotaire, memories from the actress's rather unusual childhood in post-war Suffolk
And I'm taking a break from Winter's Fire by Giles Kristian, a Viking adventure that I haven't got into and will probably abandon without finishing . . . .
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I started it this afternoon and doubt that I'll read anything else until I've finished it, a great start, seems like another superb story from the author of the wonderful Harold Fry/Queenie Hennessey novels.

I loved it, didn'twant to put it down, wanted to spend time with the various characters and couldn't wait to know what happened to them. A story of love and the enduring power of music.
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And I'm taking a break from Winter's Fire by Giles Kristian, a Viking adventure that I haven't got into and will probably abandon without finishing . . . .

No, nothing is calling me to pick it up again . . . .
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14618168
Instead I'm going to try The Fever Tree by Jennifer McVeigh, one of only 3 novels registered by other BookCrossers currently in my possession.
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I've had a few already & it's only 2 weeks into the year. Too many books to waste time on ones that just aren't working for me.
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New Beginnings by Fern Britton
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New Beginnings by Fern Britton

but not for long, already abandoned. It started OK - but when she got into presenting live on daytime TV, I soon realised I didn't want to be there!
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My current nonfiction is Everybody's Daughter, Nobody's Child by Jane Lapotaire, memories from the actress's rather unusual childhood in post-war Suffolk

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13922570
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White Cargo by Felicity Kendal, another memoir by another actress
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Reading...

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6238849

This is currently my oldest TBR. It is also on the 1001 list so it will count towards two of my challenges for 2018.
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A former NY Times no 1 bestseller. The author asks what is more important when it comes to success: talent or effort?
So far this has been a fascinating and well researched read.
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Irena's Children by Tilar J. Mazzeo
The Aviator's Wife by Melanie Benjamin
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A few

A young adult book called *Blizzard of Glass* about the Halifax Explosion of 1917. Excellent so far.

*Audacity - How Barack Obama Defied His Critics and Created a Legacy That will Prevail* by Jonathan Chait. Written in 2017, after the election. Just started it.

Still reading *Crow Lake* by Mary Lawson. It's my transit book and since I haven't been travelling in recent days, it's still in my bag. Tomorrow will give me more time to read that one.

Today I will pick up an audiobook from the library that I've been waiting for: *Uncommon Type* by Tom Hanks. I actually have the hard copy as well but have been waiting for the audiobook so Tom can read it to me (and I can follow along)!


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RE: A few

I had to go off and Google the Halifax Explosion - I had never heard of it.
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A young adult book called *Blizzard of Glass* about the Halifax Explosion of 1917. Excellent so far.


I enjoyed that one ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12743989/ ) - as well as some books-for-adults on the same topic. The scale of the disaster is still hard to grasp... (Last month I attended a talk in Boston at the genealogical society, touching on a Boston man who was instrumental in orchestrating some of the relief efforts, Abraham C. Ratshesky.)
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Yes, it was really well-written and I love books that have maps, family tree type of charts, archival photos and timelines. Being Canadian, I did know about this event but I do not remember learning about it in school. It was really eye-opening to read the details.

Yes, I do remember the mention of Ratshesky. Given that it all occurred in 1917, and that communication was so primitive compared to what we are used to today (most homes didn't have telephones or even cars, for example), the fact that thanks to the heroic efforts of a few alert people (the telegraph operator, who died in the explosion, e.g), word did get out and help did come fro near and far in a relatively quick manner. The state of Massachusetts was one of the key players in organizing relief and aid and to this day, maintains a special connection to Halifax and Dartmouth.

What I took from this book, and what I think we need to take from this, is summed up by Walker at the very end:

"Even in the darkest times, we look for a glimmer of hope. After the explosion, hope arrived in Halifax and Dartmouth with the outpouring of aid from strangers. Medical help, food, clothing, and supplies were part of it. In fact, the relief response to the harbour explosion serves as the model for today's relief missions. But hope came in another form as well. In reading survivor accounts, one quickly notices the frequent use of the word *kind*. Again and again, survivors mention the kindness of strangers...Amid the horror, people came together with one goal - to help those who needed it. And this part of the Halifax Harbour explosion story offers a reminder to everyone that there are times that ask of us to put aside our own everyday activities and become part of a larger, human story."

I don't meant to sound preachy by quoting that particular passage but given the times we are living in, I think it's a good idea to be reminded that *people helping people* and standing together in horrible times, is something that we all do, instinctively, I believe.

Interestingly, Canada Post put out a stamp last month to commemorate the 100 years since the Halifax Explosion.
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Just started. I'm intrigued by he title. (It's non-fiction.)
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An odd little book that I just started about three hours ago.
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First time I read this author. Very good.
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by Anita Shreve http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7325176
One of my oldest ABC TBRs & it fits plum's reading challenge too. Quite good quick read, but so disheartening that the victim in the abusive relationship isn't believed. In the 25 years since the book was written, sometimes that's different.
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The last in her Amelia Peabody series. Elizabeth Peters died before she finished this one, so Joan Hess took over. Just starting, so we will see if I notice a difference.
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teensy print version of In The Beauty of the Lilies by John Updike http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12010362

Another of my oldest ABC TBRs...and with a twist, it will fit plum's reading challenge.
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I have made it 53 years without having ever read this book! Thought it was about time. It's enjoyable so far.

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