2018-2019 Canadian Reading Challenge

Forum » Book Talk | Refresh | Search

Sort Options 

I ran one of these in 2013-2014 ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/487646 ) and another for 2016-2017 ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/526188 ).

I didn't succeed last time, so I'm going to start fresh in 2018: please join me!

This is a CANADIAN Provinces + Territories reading challenge for 2018-2019: read at least one book from each of Canada's provinces and territories over the course of the challenge. As a non-Canadian, I find this, well, _challenging_, so I'm making it a two-year challenge to make it a bit easier. (On the other hand, if you're very ambitious, you can shoot for doing it all in one year and again the next year, if you'd like!)

Everyone welcome: join in at any time.

The books should be SET primarily in a specific province/territory, but they don't have to stay there for the entire book. It doesn't matter where the author is from.

BookCrossing books, library books, unregistered books from your permanent collection, books borrowed from a friend, audiobooks, e-books, children's books, graphic novels, fiction, non-fiction (including travel guides)...they'll all count.

Post here whenever you finish a book for a province or territory and let us know a little about it: what did you read, what was it about, and what did you think?

Provinces (10)

▪ Alberta (AB)
▪ British Columbia (BC)
▪ Manitoba (MB)
▪ New Brunswick (NB)
▪ Newfoundland and Labrador (NL)
▪ Nova Scotia (NS)
▪ Ontario (ON)
▪ Prince Edward Island (PE)
▪ Quebec (QC)
▪ Saskatchewan (SK)

Territories (3)

▫ Northwest Territories (NT)
▫ Yukon (YT)
▫ Nunavut (NU)

~~~~~

Also...don't forget to participate in gypsysmom's mid-year Canada Days release challenge, which can be very helpful for book suggestions and resource links! (Although not all the books are _set_ in Canada.)

◦ Canada Days Challenge 2017 (sesquicentennial version): http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/539149
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2016: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/527194
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2015: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/520284
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2014: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/508645
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2013: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/495193
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2012: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/479072

Other possibly helpful links:

∙ 2017 Canada Reads books and contenders: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/538984
∙ The 2016 Canada Reads long list: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8635901
∙ Canada Reads 2015 shortlist: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/516040
∙ Canada Reads 2014: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/502888
∙ 100 Books That Make You Proud to be Canadian: forum link - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/515669 (Direct link here: http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100.html )
∙ The 49th Shelf: in particular, their book map looks promising. http://49thshelf.com/map
∙ The Globe Books 100: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/---/article15566945

~~~~~

AND - hopefully Bookworm-Lady (2017 winner) will host a Canadian Literature sweepstakes in 2018, so you might want to join that. Those threads are also helpful for finding suggestions for Canada reads.

2017 sweeps: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/541894
2016 sweeps: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/530888
2015 sweeps: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/519419

~~~~~

If you're looking for Canadian-themed BookCrossing labels and can't find the ones in the store, I have some simple ones here (along with some of my other labels): https://drive.google.com/---/0B4VmP9D2V67PRTdFZEZ1Z3Vja3M

 

I'll join again. I didn't manage to read a book set in Alberta for the current challenge and I don't think I'll make it before the end of 2017 so I am going to do better this time.

 

I failed miserably in the last round, but promise to do better this time!

 

Thanks for setting it up again and for the links

 

I'll post an update, but some of my reads were for the more challenging territories (challenging as in fewer books are written about them). I will definitely read more Canadian literature but want to finish one from each province/territory.

 

I love the labels but I seem to be having difficulty accessing them. If I hit *download*, will the entire page download? I only really want the Canadian ones, the reading statues and possibly the baseball ones. I tried to click on them but nothing happens. Please adivse. Your tech-challenged friend.....; -)

 

winghyphen8wing 10 mos ago
Label help
I love the labels but I seem to be having difficulty accessing them. If I hit *download*, will the entire page download? I only really want the Canadian ones, the reading statues and possibly the baseball ones. I tried to click on them but nothing happens. Please adivse. Your tech-challenged friend.....; -)

Not sure about mobile, but hopefully this will work a CPU:

‣ Each label is contained in a little rectangle.

‣ At the BOTTOM of that individual rectangle is a small red square that says "PDF" and a probably-truncated title. (If you hover your mouse over that title you can see the entire title.) Click on this section and a full-size preview of the sheet should come up on your screen. At the top right you should see the download arrow (downward-pointing arrow with a line under it) - click on it and follow the prompts to download.

After you download you can either use the left arrow at the top left to go back to the main screen or the pop-up left and right arrows in the (top-to-bottom) middle of the screen to preview more labels.

‣ OR, on that main screen with the little rectangles for each label, hover over the TOP portion of the label you want. The mini label preview will go grayish and a pop-up download arrow will appear at the top left of the rectangle. Click on that and follow the prompts.

Hope that helps.

‣ Oh, and I did green for the baseball labels because of our local team. I won't do logos, but if you want a particular color, I can try to dig up my original file and see if I can change it!

 

Thanks! It worked. Of course, I am a fan of the Toronto Blue Jays but don't worry. I already printed out twos sheet of the Canadian ones and one sheet of the baseball labels and that should hold me for awhile. Unless you could somehow magically find the Blue Jays logo... (seriously, don't bother, these are just fine!)

Thanks for doing these! :-)

 

winghyphen8wing 10 mos ago
RE: Label help
Thanks! It worked. Of course, I am a fan of the Toronto Blue Jays but don't worry. I already printed out twos sheet of the Canadian ones and one sheet of the baseball labels and that should hold me for awhile. Unless you could somehow magically find the Blue Jays logo... (seriously, don't bother, these are just fine!)

The Blue Jays do have a lovely logo...but logos generally come out too small on the labels.

Thanks for doing these! :-)

Every once in a while I get motivated. :)

 

This is what I accomplished in 2017. I am starting with this list and completing it in 2018. I try to read Canadian lit on a regular basis, so I will post anything I read and let others know where it takes place. Onward!

Began with The Idea of Canada: Letters to a Nation by David Johnston.

And here is the rest of my list so far:

Provinces (10)

▪ Alberta (AB)
▪ British Columbia (BC)
▪ Manitoba (MB) - The Break by Katherena Vermette
▪ New Brunswick (NB) -
▪ Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) - The Colony of Unrequited Dreams by Wayne Johnston - tremendous writing.
▪ Nova Scotia (NS) - I Am a Truck by Michelle Winters - fascinating development
▪ Ontario (ON) - We Were Liars by E. Lockhart - YA novel and highly recommended.
▪ Prince Edward Island (PE)
▪ Quebec (QC)
▪ Saskatchewan (SK)

Territories (3)

▫ Northwest Territories (NT)
▫ Yukon (YT)
▫ Nunavut (NU) The Right to Be Cold by Sheila Watt-Coultier

 

I received Louise Penny's latest Gamache book for Christmas and it didn't linger on the unread pile for very long. Glass Houses is set in Quebec (as are all of the other books except for a brief foray in one to the Queen Charlotte Islands) so this will be my Quebec book for the challenge:
Glass Houses by Louise Penny:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14850042

 

I received Louise Penny's latest Gamache book for Christmas and it didn't linger on the unread pile for very long. Glass Houses is set in Quebec (as are all of the other books except for a brief foray in one to the Queen Charlotte Islands) so this will be my Quebec book for the challenge:
Glass Houses by Louise Penny:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14850042

So then I had to look up the Queen Charlotte Islands..and Queen Charlotte herself. :)

 

I received Louise Penny's latest Gamache book for Christmas and it didn't linger on the unread pile for very long. Glass Houses is set in Quebec (as are all of the other books except for a brief foray in one to the Queen Charlotte Islands) so this will be my Quebec book for the challenge:
Glass Houses by Louise Penny:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14850042

So then I had to look up the Queen Charlotte Islands..and Queen Charlotte herself. :)

The Queen Charlotte Islands are now called Haida Gwaii as they are the homeland of the Haida indigenous peoples. They are supposed to be spectacular but I have not been there yet. It's on the bucket list.

 

SK: Where I Live Now by Sharon Butala
Technically, Sharon Butala now lives in Alberta but she spent most of her life in Saskatchewan and in this book she looks back particularly on the 31 years she spent living with her husband in southwest SK, near the Cypress Hills. Wonderful descriptions of that milieu.
http://www.librarything.com/---/149806710

NWT: Minds of Winter by Ed O'Loughlin
This book was on the short list for the Giller Prize last year but I didn't get to read it before the prize was announced and it was not the winner. However, the description sounded like something I would like so I put a hold on a library copy and just finished it. I am listing it for the NWT because, although action takes place all over the globe including Antartica, China, Vancouver Island and Russia, it starts and ends in Inuvik, NWT. Anyone who is fascinated by Arctic exploration and/or the Franklin Expedition should find this a good read.
http://www.librarything.com/---/150301162

 

Here's what I have so far:

ONTARIO: I just finished *Crow Lake* by Mary Lawson (http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/2739871)

NOVA SCOTIA: *Blizzard of Glass* (written for a YA audience, this is a very well-written account of the great Explosion in Halifax Harbour in 1917. Well-researched, with lots of photos, archival documents, and maps. It was a library book and I foud it rivetting.

Tomorrow, I will be starting *I'm Your Man*, a biography of Leonard Cohenby Sylvie Simmons. He is from Montreal (Quebec) although the author is American. Would this count, or does the author have to be from the designated province?

 

Tomorrow, I will be starting *I'm Your Man*, a biography of Leonard Cohenby Sylvie Simmons. He is from Montreal (Quebec) although the author is American. Would this count, or does the author have to be from the designated province?

What I said before is:

"The books should be SET primarily in a specific province/territory, but they don't have to stay there for the entire book. It doesn't matter where the author is from."

If you read the book, you're the best judge of what "primarily" means. If it covers Cohen's early life and/or he lived in Quebec for a significant portion of his adult life, I'd say it's fine.

 

I'm a big fan of Giles Blunt's police procedurals set in a fictional north Ontario town called Algonquin Bay which is really North Bay. His books are being made into TV miniseries on CTV and the second season just concluded. Although I had Blackfly Season on my TBR pile for a couple of years I didn't get it read before the series started so I decided to read the book up to the end of the weekly program as they were aired. The finale was this past week so I finished the book and, of course, I thought the book was better than the TV version. However, I have to say that the opening credits for the TV series are the most beautiful I have ever seen and really capture the beauty of the northern boreal forest.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13443951

 

I cannot join in, as much I'd like to (another book club list is in the way!) but, here are some suggestions if you're stuck:
Ontario (ON): Crow Lake by Mary Lawson
Northwest Territories (NWT: ) Late Nights on Air by Elizabeth Hay
Saskatchewan (SK): Who Has Seen the Wind by W.O. Mitchell
British Columbia (BC): The Paperboy's Winter by Tim Bowling
Alberta (AB): 419 by Will Ferguson (a good chunk takes place in AB)

 

I cannot join in, as much I'd like to (another book club list is in the way!) but, here are some suggestions if you're stuck:

Always grateful for recommendations; thanks!

 

I cannot join in, as much I'd like to (another book club list is in the way!) but, here are some suggestions if you're stuck:
Ontario (ON): Crow Lake by Mary Lawson
Northwest Territories (NWT: ) Late Nights on Air by Elizabeth Hay
Saskatchewan (SK): Who Has Seen the Wind by W.O. Mitchell
British Columbia (BC): The Paperboy's Winter by Tim Bowling
Alberta (AB): 419 by Will Ferguson (a good chunk takes place in AB)


Thanks for the ideas. AB, BC and ON tend to turn up for me, but NWT and SK - not so much

 

I don't think I've ever read a book set in Labrador - I had to look up where it was!

Sharing Spaces by Nadia Nichols http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8456582

Yes, a romance, but a lot of description that after being checked against Wikipedia, seems to be pretty accurate.

Would you want to own a fishing retreat that's so remote it's only accessible by float plane? Seems a lot like Alaska or the wilds of Michigan in this area.

 

wingNancyNovawing 7 mos ago
#2 Alberta
The Cowboy's Bride by Carolynne Aarsen http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7522249

Author is from Alberta, so that's where she set this romance which was relatively good, with a happy ending, of course.

 

I read Tenderness of Wolves ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14665188 ), which is set in the "Northern Territories" - from context, and Hudson Bay Company references, it sounds like it's in what is now Nunavut, though it could have been in northern Ontario. Any guidelines for this kind of thing? {wry grin}

 

I read Tenderness of Wolves ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14665188 ), which is set in the "Northern Territories" - from context, and Hudson Bay Company references, it sounds like it's in what is now Nunavut, though it could have been in northern Ontario. Any guidelines for this kind of thing? {wry grin}

I've read a few books that took place before there was the division in the Northwest Territory but which were obviously in what is now Nunavut. I've counted them for Nunavut but that's just me.

 

wingNancyNovawing 6 mos ago
#3 Ontario
the tale of a murderess - or was she? Set in the 1800s, Grace is imprisoned in Ontario

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7752535

 

the tale of a murderess - or was she? Set in the 1800s, Grace is imprisoned in Ontario

Alias Grace by Margaret Atwood http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7752535

One of my favourite Atwood's. A miniseries of the book aired last year on CBC and I thought it was very well done.

 

The Wolves of Winter by Tyrell Johnson is a post-apocalyptic tale set in the Yukon. This is Johnson's first published book and it has a few plot holes but nothing major so it didn't make me dislike the book. In fact, there is lots to like including a strong female central character. I really liked how central the winter weather was as well. The book posits a winter that is colder and snowier than at present but it evokes that feeling of combatting the elements that is so much a part of living in a cold climate.

 

wingNancyNovawing 5 mos ago
#4 PEI
And of course, it's from the Anne series!

Rilla of Ingelside by L.M. Montgomery http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13017785

Interesting to read a book that was written almost 100 years ago, when WWI was fresh in mind and WWII wasn't even thought of. Quite sobering

 

Quid Pro Quo by Vicki Grant is set in and around Halifax, NS. It's a book for the YA audience but I thought it was quite good
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15121888

 

Green Grass Running Water by Thomas King

It is different; multiple story lines and so far I’m still getting into it but loving it.

 

Provinces (10)

▪ Alberta (AB) - Green Grass Running Water by Thomas King
▪ British Columbia (BC)
▪ Manitoba (MB) - The Break by Katherena Vermette
▪ New Brunswick (NB) -
▪ Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) - The Colony of Unrequited Dreams by Wayne Johnston - tremendous writing.
▪ Nova Scotia (NS) - I Am a Truck by Michelle Winters - fascinating development
▪ Ontario (ON) - We Were Liars by E. Lockhart - YA novel and highly recommended.
▪ Prince Edward Island (PE)
▪ Quebec (QC)
▪ Saskatchewan (SK)

Territories (3)

▫ Northwest Territories (NT)
▫ Yukon (YT)
▫ Nunavut (NU) The Right to Be Cold by Sheila Watt-Coultier

That's what I've read so far. Has anyone read Green Grass Running Water by Thomas King? I'd love to discuss it with someone.

 

I haven't read that one or any others by him but I have heard he is a great writer.

I loved the book you read by Wayne Johnston from Nfld. Loved it! There is a sequel or 2 (titles escaping me at the moment and I am not at home to go check as I own several more titles by him).

You are doing amazingly well with this challenge! I am also trying to read more CanLit this year. I should go back to my log book and list what I have read. When I get home....

 

I read Green Grass Running Water a number of years ago. It was chosen by my book club shortly after I joined. I do remember I thought it was a terrific book. It was the first of King's that I had read but it sparked a continuing interest in his writing. One of the things I still remember was the reference to the boats Columbus sailed to America in by using cars. Was it a Nissan a Pinto and a Karmenghia?

 

Requiem by Frances Itani is about the internment of the Japanese Canadians after Pearl Harbor was bombed. It follows one young boy and the details ring very true. Itani's husband was about the same age as the character and his family was interned in a camp by the Fraser River in BC. Itani is very clear that this is not her husband's story but obviously he told her a lot about his experience. I have loved all of Itani's books but I think this may be my favourite.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12806583

 

I have loved all of Itani's books but I think this may be my favourite.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12806583

Good to know: I want to read that one, eventually. :)

 

I wanted a classic book to read for my home province of Manitoba. I picked Where Nests the Water Hen by Gabrielle Roy.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14220521

I had read this book before but so long ago I didn't remember much of it. Also I read in Roy's memoir Enchantment and Sorrow about her time teaching in the Little Waterhen school and it made me want to read her fictional treatment again. This is an absolutely charming book that really evokes the time and place, one which has disappeared with the advent of better roads and means of communication. If anyone is interested in reading it I would be pleased to send it by mail.

 

PMing

 

I'm behind on my posting...but even further behind on my reading! :s

The Day the World Came to Town: 9/11 in Gander, Newfoundland
by Jim DeFede
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15053128

Nonfiction. This was a re-read: some stories are worth reading more than once.

2018-19 list: NL

 

Never Say Die by Will Hobbs
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15032375

Adventure story featuring young men, bears, white water, and survival in the far North.

2018-19 list: NL • YT

 

Ramshackle: A Yellowknife Story
by Allison McCreesh
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15073074

Biography/memoir in graphic format; very interesting.

2018-19 list: NL • YT • NT

 

Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story
by David Alexander Robinson; artwork by Scott B. Henderson
e-book

Graphic novel based on a true story: it sounds like the residential schools in Canada were as terrible for the First Nations people as the equivalent system was for the Native Americans in the US...

2018-19 list: NL • YT • NT • MB

 

I am currently a bit more than half way through a really excellent NF book called *The Reason You Walk* by Wab Kinew. It is the story of his father, who was taken to a residential school as a child, and the effect that had on his life (and yes, it was not only horrific but also a truly disgraceful and unconscionable chapter of our country's history). It is also Wab's story. I only know him as the host, for a couple of years, of the CBC's Canada Reads competition and I really liked what I saw of him there. He is an articulate, accomplished and successful writer, musician, broadcaster and this book is no exception to those talents, as he describes his reconciliation with his father, in addition to their history. Wab's efforts to bring a resurgence of Indigenous culture into the mainstream, through education, music, and story-telling is no small feat. It is quite a story and I am finding it hard to put down. He also recently wrote a children's book about Indigenous heroes, in the same vein as Barack Obama's famous children's book called *Of Thee I Sing*. It's a beautiful book. Kinew's book is called *Go Show the World*.

Incidentally, he left the CBC and the Canada Reads project a couple of years ago to go into politics. I think he would make a terrific and much needed politician and I wish only good things for him in his future.

 

I am currently a bit more than half way through a really excellent NF book called *The Reason You Walk* by Wab Kinew. It is the story of his father, who was taken to a residential school as a child, and the effect that had on his life (and yes, it was not only horrific but also a truly disgraceful and unconscionable chapter of our country's history). It is also Wab's story. I only know him as the host, for a couple of years, of the CBC's Canada Reads competition and I really liked what I saw of him there. He is an articulate, accomplished and successful writer, musician, broadcaster and this book is no exception to those talents, as he describes his reconciliation with his father, in addition to their history. Wab's efforts to bring a resurgence of Indigenous culture into the mainstream, through education, music, and story-telling is no small feat. It is quite a story and I am finding it hard to put down. He also recently wrote a children's book about Indigenous heroes, in the same vein as Barack Obama's famous children's book called *Of Thee I Sing*. It's a beautiful book. Kinew's book is called *Go Show the World*.

Incidentally, he left the CBC and the Canada Reads project a couple of years ago to go into politics. I think he would make a terrific and much needed politician and I wish only good things for him in his future.

I was lucky enough to be in the audience when Wab read his new book. Before the reading started Wab talked to audience members and I heard him use three different languages (English, French and an aboriginal tongue). When he was answering questions he mentioned that he had also recently successfully defended his master's thesis. Keep in mind that he is the leader of the Opposition in the Manitoba Legislature (which he referred to as his day job) and that he is the father of three young boys. He's a great example for aboriginal people.

 

I was all set to go to an author reading at the Toronto Reference Library. He was the author. For some reason, I phoned the library to ask if we had to sign in or something (since it was a free event). Good thing that I called because they said it was completely full and I should have reserved seats ages ago. Who knew. Well, I will know for next time. My friend and I were really disappointed, as we had both been looking forward to the event so much. How lucky that you saw him speak. I have so much admiration for him. The book I am reading is very good. Have you read it yet?

The new children's book is a beauty. I saw it at Word on the Street, our annual book fair, but since I don't have children or grandchildren and am now retired from teaching, I really had no reason to purchase it. But it's lovely and very timely. Good on him!

 

Are you sure you want to delete this item? It cannot be undone.