(Use new thread) 2012 July-Sept Country-Hopping Challenge

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Welcome to all, even if you haven't participated yet. Join at any time and list your 2012 goal (if you have one) or just say "no goal" and read away!

AFTER you've read the book, post here in a separate entry - the book # towards your goal, title, author, country, BC link (if appropriate) and a little about the book you chose (loved it, hated it, where it's going next, a synopsis, whatever). Others are welcome to comment on your entry.

Rules:
1) Any country, territory or dependency counts
2) Only one book/country
3) Can be setting OR author from the country, if the author makes sense (An american author writing about Japan, doesn't make sense unless s/he was raised in that country)
4) All genre's welcome, as long as it's a book. It could be Fiction, Non-Fiction, Childrens/teens (there were some GREAT ones in the 666 challenge). No travelogues, like Zagat's guide to xxx - that's TOO easy
5) Books can be from any source: TBR pile, rabck, library, borrowed

Ideas for countries: http://www.worldatlas.com/---/nations.htm
Fiction authors: http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/
You can also keyword search for a country in most library searches.

This is a no-pressure reading challenge. Hopefully, you'll expand your reading horizons and find some gems that you may have overlooked along the way.

 

I'm up to 20 out of my target 50 now. I obviously haven't been trying hard enough to read books from or about different countries.

 

I obviously haven't been trying hard enough to read books from or about different countries.


Same goes for me, reading a book about Sri Lanka now, but most others are the usual European, American, Canadian stuff. Will try to travel to a few other countries while on holiday.

 

wingmaryzeewing 6 yrs ago
7/12 Nepal
Earlier this week I read The Lost Explorer: Finding Mallory on Mt. Everest by Conrad Anker and David Roberts. Conrad Anker is one of the mountain climbers who found Mallory's body in 1999 on Mt. Everest, where it had lain since 1924.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10322950

 

and updated/closed that thread. We're up to 90 countries/ territories/ dependencies.

Spreadsheet here: http://tinyurl.com/7nx62j9


Answers:
Tibet - yes
Hong Kong - yes
Basque - no (that's spain)

I removed the dependency link - it doesn't work. So I will try to keep up with the questions better (or anyone else can weigh in!)

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#43 - 44
43. Hong Kong - Sea otters gambolling in the wild, wild surf http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11182173
44. Bosnia - S.: a novel about the Balkans http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10206355

 

LiniP 6 yrs ago
#17-18
#17: Sri Lanka: Riff http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11240125 , a wonderful book about a boy growing up to be a cook in Sri Lanka.
#18: Ireland, A Place Called Here by Cecilia Ahern, interesting idea about where the missing people and things go

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
45. Vietnam
45. Vietnam - The Sorrow of War by Bao Ninh http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11069894

 

Australia - Moonlight Downs by Adrian Hyland was a good mystery. The setting in an Aboriginal settlement of Australia gave it a very interesting flavor.

Cambodia - The Map of Lost Memories by Kim Fay was a terrific archeological adventure set in 1925 Cambodia. Irene Blum discovers her own past as she uncovers the past of the Khmer people. The reason for the expedition that she founds is to search for a set of copper scrolls deep in the Cambodian jungle. The expedition must be kept secret and she has no idea if she can trust the other members of her expedition. I highly recommend this book to anyone who craves adventure! It is an ARC with an on-sale date of Aug. 21.

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#46 and #47
46. Israel - Extreme Rambling by Mark Thomas http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11011687
non-fiction by an English comedian who decides to walk Israel's barrier with the West Bank, interesting stuff.

47. Laos - Thirty Three Teeth by Colin Cotterill http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11190288
the second of three books in the Dr Sira mystery series, a lovely book and I'll be looking out for the rest of the series now.

 

The Weight of Water by Anita Shreve
I read this one for the Orange Prize Challenge, but then found a lot of it takes place in Norway, so I'm counting it. This is the retelling of a historic murder mystery on the Isle of Shoals off the coast of Maine/NH in the late 19th Century. The book goes back and forth between the historical tale and the story of a family crisis in the life of a photographer visiting the site for a magazine story shoot. I reviewed it on my blog: http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/from-norway-to-smuttynose-island/ . I liked it, but not as much as I have liked some of the other things I have read lately.

 

48. Ukraine - Death and the Penguin by Andrey Kurkov http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11124929
afraid I didn't really enjoy this one, found it hard to make head nor tail of the plot. However tbh I only picked it up because it was set in Ukraine - you win some, you lose some!

but the good thing is that I've just read eparks post... I read Weight of Water back in May but it didn't occur to me to count it as Norway (probably because I have a Jo Nesbo on my TBR pile and had already mentally marked that as 'Norway'). However eparks is quite right, a good bit of the story is set in Norway and the main historical characters are all Norwegian, so I think it counts.

so 49. Norway - The Weight of Water, Anita Shreve http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10250181/


 

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: or The Murder at Road Hill House by Kate Summerscale.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6979008/

This was a good, solid read for me, not great, but certainly memorable. It tells of the murder of a 3-year-old boy in 1860, and the early investigations of Scotland Yard. The added (and unexpected) bonus of this book is there was a good bit about how early detective fiction developed thru the newspaper coverage of early Victorian crimes. Mentioned in the book are Wilkie Collins (both The Woman in White and The Moonstone), Dickens (Bleak House and The Mystery of Edwin Drood), and Henry James (The Turn of the Screw).

 

Two thumbs up! I loved Hotel du Lac. It reminded me in parts of classic authors such as Edith Wharton or E.M. Forster, with a bit of Rosamunde Pilcher. I still can't quite figure out why that is, but I loved it!

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#50 - Nigeria
Things fall apart, by Chinua Achebe http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10473360
an interesting tale of the clash of traditional Nigerian cultures and those brought by white missionaries, set at the start of the colonial period

I think I might review my target, given that I'm up to 50 and my target was 52... the next two books on Mt TBR are from Dubai and Saudi Arabia, so I'll definitely make that. I think I'll go for 75 countries, it's going to get harder as I've done many of the more common ones, but excluding the two I've just mentioned, I can think of at least another six that are already on Mt TBR and I've just been on abebooks and bought a few second hand ones covering various African countries and a bit more of the Caribbean.

Not going away this year (other than a couple of trips to my parents' house on Islay) so I shall go around the world in books instead!

 

Not going away this year (other than a couple of trips to my parents' house on Islay) so I shall go around the world in books instead!


It's one way to travel!

 

The Sand Fish: a novel from Dubai, by Maha Gargash

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11044811

A really interesting book set in Dubai (United Arab Emirates) and written by an Emirati woman. Set in the 1950s, it tells the story of a young woman from a mountainous area of the region who becomes the third wife of a wealthy pearl trader, before oil transformed the local economy.

I've decided to set this one up as an international bookring, it was a really good book and novels from UAE are few and far between - particularly novels written by women - so hopefully others will get to read it too. Link to the international bookring is here http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/480307

 

Hi - can I join in please (but no goal).

I've just read "The Seamstress" written originally in Spanish by Maria Duenas. Its a big book (609 pages in the hardback edition) but its in four parts and the individual chapters are short so you can soon whizz through it and, in my humble opinion, its a good story.

 

Hi - can I join in please (but no goal).

Welcome - anyone can join at any time! You don't have to have a goal - just read what you like and hopefully this challenge will help you spread your reading out and get you to explore other horizons.

Nancy

 

This was an excellent account of growing up during Zimbabwe's painful transition from Rhodesia in a idyllic natural location and amidst the break-up of a family.

I found the incongruity of the natural surroundings and the extreme violence of the guerilla war to be especially well portrayed in this book, and it seems that it is almost a metonomy for much of Africa even now. It seems to have so much natural beauty, although much of that depends on the wildlife and is being lost at an alarming rate, and the African people in general seem so gentle and good, but yet, they have to live with so much violence.

I think that I actually liked this better than Alexandra Fuller's Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, although it's been a long time since I read that one.

 

I've read and enjoyed The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Loved it, but definitely an emotional tale. It's been languishing on Mt. TBR for years, and I took advantage of Plum-Crazy's Can't Decide what to Read in July thread (Olympics) to get me to finally read this one. This is one I won't forget for a long time.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/4319009/

 

52. The Night of the Miraj, by Zoe Ferraris - a slightly confusing murder mystery, but with very interesting accounts of life in Saudi Arabia
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11275400

and I've done 52 books, woo hoo!! On with my new target of 75... I was rummaging around the TBR shelves and I've found 6 or 7 other countries, I think, plus I've got some African and Caribbean books on order from abebooks. Loving this challenge NancyNova!

 

52. The Night of the Miraj, by Zoe Ferraris - a slightly confusing murder mystery, but with very interesting accounts of life in Saudi Arabia
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11275400

and I've done 52 books, woo hoo!! On with my new target of 75... I was rummaging around the TBR shelves and I've found 6 or 7 other countries, I think, plus I've got some African and Caribbean books on order from abebooks. Loving this challenge NancyNova!

Glad it has you "hopping" around the world!

 

12. Philomena's Miracle by Betty Neels http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7039248/

I normally would not count a 'romance', but this writer, now deceased, deserves a much wider following for her sweet, gentle, full of details books. They are absolutely nothing like the Silhouette or Harlequins, although they tend to be shelved together.

She wrote quite a few books after retirement from nursing, and most have been reissued. All are slightly different - and when I find one, I know it will be a good light read.

 

eparks4232 6 yrs ago
#33 Peru
Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter by Mario Vargas Llosa. Enjoyed it alot. It's fun and quick and gives a decent picture of Lima in the 50s. Review is http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/a-romp-through-lima/

 

The Lemon Tree: An Arab, A Jew and the Heart of the Middle East by Sandy Tolan.

When Bashir shows up on Dahlia's doorstep to visit the house from which he and his family were expelled 20 years previously, they strike up a tentative, unusual friendship that would last their whole lives. The friendship is unusual because Bashir is a Palestinian Arab and Dahlia is an Israeli Jew.

This is an outstanding non-fiction book for anyone looking to gain some understanding of that area of the world. I highly recommend it. Tolan's research was meticulous.

 

LiniP 6 yrs ago
#19-21
#19: Greece: Zorbas the Greek by Nikos Katzanzakis: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5743875/ , one of the Classics and a truly enjoyable read
#20: Sweden: Vergebung by Stieg Larsson, the last of the trilogy: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8514719/
#21: Algeria: Die Pest by Albert Camus: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8630038/

 

I am not sure what number I am up to now and I can't find the Apr to Jun thread, but I managed to read another for my list.

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini for Afghanistan. This book was definitely a lot better than The Kite Runner, I cried my eyes out with this book.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11224051

 

I think you were up to #7 in the other thread: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/475076

I've been keeping track of the countries here, but not individual counts
http://tinyurl.com/7nx62j9

 



I've been keeping track of the countries here, but not individual counts
http://tinyurl.com/7nx62j9


nice spreadsheet!

 

The Turkish Gambit by Boris Akunin, which was a great detective/spy novel set in 1877 Bulgaria during the Russo-Turkish War. Akunin was born in Georgia.

 

LiniP 6 yrs ago
#22
#22: Iran: Gilgamesh Epos by anonymous, I have set it in modern day Iran.

 

eparks4232 6 yrs ago
#34
Nigeria: The Secret Lives of Baba Segi's Wives by Lola Shoneyin. Fun read available on Kindle. Here's my review: http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/729/

 

14. FINLAND The Finn Family Moomintroll, by Tove Jansson

A children's book, but definitely set in Finland, as well as Finish author of course.
Up to now, I have chosen my Country Hopping books to be set in the country, not only an author from that country. But that is changing now:
15.BELGIUM Death of a nobody, by Georges Simenon (author born in Belgium)
16 INDIA The space between us, by Thrity Ungar http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11307104/

goal:20

 

wingFifnawing 6 yrs ago
#5 Bosnia
The Cellist of Sarajevo by Steven Galloway is set in Bosnia, during the siege of Sarajevo in the 1990s.

 

I have just read Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote which is set in New York city, USA. I enjoyed very much. Strictly speaking, it is a novella, but I think it will still count. Where to next I wonder.

 

I could not get out of the city of London UK.
Lifeless by Mark Billingham
Supect by Michael Rothbottom
Lost by Michael Rothbottom
The Old wine Shades by Martha Grime
The Black Cat by Martha Grime

 

The Razor's Edge by Somerset Maugham

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#53 and #54
53. Kenya - Game Control, Lionel Shriver http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11037083

Can't say I particularly enjoyed this one - set in the NGO/ex-pat community Nairobi, with lots of discussion around birth control/population control and a conspiracy theory. Preferred We need to talk about Kevin! I think the main problem was that all of the characters either seemed to be horrible or just rather stupid...

54. Bangladesh - A Golden Age, Tahmima Anam http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11324961

A brilliant first novel by this Bangleshi-born novellist, who I see has a second novel which seems to be a follow-up. Set at the time of the Bangladesh war of independence in the early 70s, this tells the story of one woman's struggle to hold her family together when her son and daughter are drawn into the uprising. Beautifully written, moving and very relevant to current events in the 'Arab Spring'. I confess I knew nothing about the Bengali struggle for independence - I vaguely knew that it had been West Pakistan after partition, and I'd eaten the most amazing fish in a Bengali restaurant in Bethnal Green a few years ago (incredibly spicy, I seem to remember) but other than that, I didn't really know much about Bangladesh at all. Well worth a read and I've added her second novel to my wishlist.

 

wingFifnawing 6 yrs ago
#6 Russia
'Kleine landjes. Berichten uit de Kaukasus', by Jelle Brandt Corstius. The title translates as 'Small countries. Reports from the Caucasus'. An interesting insight into some of the small republics in this part of Russia, such as Kalmykia and Karachay-Cherkessia.

 

Hi Nancy. I have just finished The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark (Scotland) and Family Album by Penelope Lively (England).


I am now reading Maigret In Court by Georges Simenon (France).

 

Hi Nancy. I have just finished The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark (Scotland) and Family Album by Penelope Lively (England).


England and Scotland count as one country, the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom also includes Wales and Northern Ireland.

 

O.K. Sorry

 

LiniP 6 yrs ago
#23: Spain
#23: Spain: Handorakel by Balthasar Gracian: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9908553/ Interesting ideas from Spain, written in the 17th century.

 

I've read and thoroughly enjoyed Buttertea at Sunrise: A Year in the Bhutan Himalaya. The author volunteers to spend a year working in a physiotherapy clinic in Bhutan, near India. She deals with deprivations of working at this remote outpost: lack of supplies and equipment, and sometimes no electricity or water either. She learns to love the people, and meets her future husband as well.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7894344/

 

ooh, sounds interesting. Another one to add to my ever extending list!

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#55 - Hungary
This one was set in London but the characters were all Hungarian, so I will count it for Hungary (I think this is allowed in this challenge? I hope so!)

In any case it was a really good read about the daughter of introspective Hungarian immigrants and the family outcast - an uncle based on the infamous London landlord, Peter Rachman.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10411456

 

This one was set in London but the characters were all Hungarian, so I will count it for Hungary (I think this is allowed in this challenge? I hope so!)

In any case it was a really good read about the daughter of introspective Hungarian immigrants and the family outcast - an uncle based on the infamous London landlord, Peter Rachman.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10411456


It's whatever makes sense for the book. So, Hungary is fine.

 

 

From the U.K. to France. I have just finished reading Maigret in Court (France). Where to next?

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#56 - Iceland
Iceland - The Ballad of Lee Cotton by Christopher Wilson

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11337662

an off the wall story about a young man born in segregated Mississippi of Icelandic and African American parentage. A tale of humanity and the fluid nature of identity... I got really into this one and enjoyed it.

Another one where it was the main character rather than the setting of the book. The character is born blue-eyed, blonde and white as a result of his Mama's dalliance with an Icelandic sailor, and this mixed identity is central to the rest of the book. Won't say any more in case others want to read it!

 

eparks4232 6 yrs ago
#35 Egypt
The Harafish by Naguib Mahfouz http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10373246
Fascinating read in light of current Egyptian situation. It is all about the fate of the little guy vs. the rich in the context of an epic family saga. I recommend it. Here is my review: http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/in-an-egyptian-alleyway-looking-for-ashurs-true-heir/

 

MissTree 6 yrs ago
#35 Wales
Among Others by Jo Walton

I'm not normally into fantasy, but this coming-of-age/fantasy novel was so wonderful, that I've added it to my list of favorites. One of the main themes is how books/reading, especially sci-fi and fantasy helps the young protagonist through a very painful coming-of-age. I really adored this book!

 

Among Others by Jo Walton

I'm not normally into fantasy, but this coming-of-age/fantasy novel was so wonderful, that I've added it to my list of favorites. One of the main themes is how books/reading, especially sci-fi and fantasy helps the young protagonist through a very painful coming-of-age. I really adored this book!


You already got England - so, England, Scotland and Wales are all the UK. I didn't add this book on.

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#57 - Mongolia
Lords of the Bow by Colin Iggulden

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10054266


The second in Iggulden's growing series on the life of Genghis Khan. A bloodthirsty blockbuster of a book, I rather enjoyed this. Meticulously researched with historical notes at the back as well as the page-turning action! I'd recommend his books for anyone doing this challenge, and I don't think you would have needed to have read the first book - this would stand on its own just fine.

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#58 - Libya
In the country of men, Hisham Matar

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11349768

I can't remember if it was on this thread or another thread that this book was recommended, but thank you whoever it was - found this in a charity shop and snapped it up, and it was a very good read. A book that 'lingers' after you've finished it.

 

eparks4232 6 yrs ago
#36 Korea
Well it takes place a bunch of places, but I'm counting it as Korea.

Cloud Atlas is great. It's 6 books, 6 genres, 6 places in one. My review is http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/following-a-cloud-atlas-across-time-and-space/

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#59 - Cuba
Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina Garcia

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11190308

a book about three generations of the same Cuban family, full of contradictions, dreams, desires, madness. The book gave a family tree at the start and I needed it as it jumped from character to character, but overall a decent read.

 

This one was great. Nonfiction from Lesotho: Singing Away the Hunger. My review is http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/singing-away-the-hunger-in-lesotho/
If anyone wants it, PM me in the next few days and I will send it to you, otherwise, I'm going to release it someplace.

 

eparks4232 6 yrs ago
#38 Spain
Another fun one: The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/in-barcelona-with-a-good-book/

 

but I can not get out of the US ofA or the Uk. September is here so I'll try to be a bit more adventurous. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is the next one up.

 

LiniP 6 yrs ago
#24
#24: Turkey, Topkapi by Eric Ambler, a crime story which takes mostly place in Istanbul.

 

Phew - there's hope yet. I've been like varykino, stuck mostly in the US even if it is a book that looked like it would be another country :-)

13. The Moon in the Mango Tree by Pamela Binnings Ewen http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7389731/

Excellent rabck to me, now looking for another home.

Editted to note - it's off to it's new home across the continent!

 

The Sandglass by Romesh Gunesekera

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11378247

Bit of a so-so book which meandered around the place, good in bits though.

 

Kiribati - The Sex Lives of Cannibals by J. Maarten Troost. This is an account of the two years that the author spent in Kiribati, on the Island of Tarawa in the South Pacific. It was enjoyable enough to finish, but I never connected with the author, and in fact, found him rather immature and annoying.

Chile- The Neruda Case by Roberto Ampuero. This was an interesting detective novel set mainly in the chaotic Chile of the early 1970's. I really liked the author's descriptions of Valparaiso, and of Neruda's home.

 

The man who wanted to be happy, by Laurent Gounelle

An interesting philosophical read, apparently based on the principles of NLP (neurolinguistic programming). Bought on a whim at WH Smith's in the station as it was set in Bali and I needed a second book for the 'buy one, get one half price offer' - glad I did!

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11389469

 

wingFifnawing 6 yrs ago
#7 France
No Telling, by Adam Thorpe. http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/3631711
It's written from the perspective of a 12-year-old boy growing up in a rather complicated family, at the time of the 1968 riots in Paris. Enjoyed it very much.

 

I have just read The Book of Summers by Emylia Hall, the bulk of which is set in Hungary. Its a good read with an interesting twist.

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#62 - Austria
Embers - Sandor Marai http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10518106

It's by a Hungarian author but I'd already had Hungary - however it's set in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, or at least in what was formerly the Empire - it jumps about a bit in time & place but some of the action is in Vienna, and this is the only geographic place that's really made clear in the book, so I'm counting it for Austria.

Set in the mid 20th century, this book is the story of two old men meeting after 40 years - childhood friends who parted as young men after a deep betrayal. Liked the idea of the book but it wasn't really my cup of tea.

 

MissTree 6 yrs ago
#38 Russia
Great Short Works of Leo Tolstoy by Leo Tolstoy (of course).

I very much enjoyed this, but I think that long epics were more Tolstoy's real milieu. His big themes just didn't fit as well into novellas and short stories, and after reading one after another they also started to seem a bit repetitive. They were still excellent, though.

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#63 - Burma
Under the Dragon by Rory MacLean http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11410750

Really good book - a fascinating insight into a country that I know very little about (along with, I suspect, most Western readers) - beyond George Orwell and Aun San Su Kyi (apologies for my spelling!)The book mixes travelogue and lifestories - I've pm'd Boekentrol for an address to pass this copy on, but I'm going to buy a new copy for my partner as this is the sort of book she'd love.

This was a bookring started by KiwiinEngland, I think it's still open if others wanted to sign up. Unfortunately I managed to lose/wild release the original book but I bought a replacement, which will be on its way shortly.

 

This book goes over three levels: the Masai tribe, the colonial times and a film made in modern times about a antropologist in colonial times, who becaem very close to the Masai. Interesting to have a look in three 'era's'

 

This book goes over three levels: the Masai tribe, the colonial times and a film made in modern times about a antropologist in colonial times, who becaem very close to the Masai. Interesting to have a look in three 'era's'


I wikipedia'd this tribe. So are you counting the book for Kenya or Tanzania?

 

Kenya.I also googled the tribe, NancyNova, and did not know at first which country to choose.
But somewhere on the books's blurb Kenya is mentioned, so I have chosen that.
Sorry I forgot to put it in my post! I have tried but cannot change the post any more.

 

LiniP 6 yrs ago
#25: Russia
The Eye of the Red Tsar by Sam Eastland: An entertaining read.

 

I said I would start the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Well I read the new Stephen King book 11/22/63. All 800 plus pages. Help I can't get out of the USA.

 

I said I would start the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Well I read the new Stephen King book 11/22/63. All 800 plus pages. Help I can't get out of the USA.



LOL! Me too. I only have two more books to go for my 15, but I can't quite seem to get the right countries. Read one - England - oops, already did Wales. Read another - Egypt - oops, already did that one. I'm going to have to check carefully before another duplicate countries jumps off the shelf {grin}

 

wingpam99wing 6 yrs ago
#64 Egypt
The Yacoubian Building, Alaa Al-Aswany http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10366389

I'd seen this recommended a few times so thought I'd have a look. Took a while to get into this but once I did, it was a good read - set in Cairo at the time of the first Gulf War, it tells of a changing society through the lives of the residents of the Yacoubian Building.

 

Ok, somehow I've got different totals for here and my around the world challenge, but I can't figure out which ones I missed here, so at the point that I hit 50 there, maybe I will just cut and paste the list. OY.

Meanwhile
Guyana: Disappearance by David Dabydeen
Argentina: Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges

Disappearance was a short, quick read. A black Guyanese engineer goes to England and stays with an aging woman who has lived in Africa. The two have conversations that challenge his sense of his own identity. I liked this one very much. Review at http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/attempting-to-tame-the-sea-in-guyana-and-rural-england/

Labyrinths is a collection of stories, essays and parables by Borges. Reading Borges is like walking into an Escher drawing. He plays with time and identity and reality in all kinds of ways. The essays range from accessible to somewhat dense (lots of philosophy), and the parables are one to two page little gems. Full review is at http://bethslistlove.wordpress.com/---/in-the-labyrinth-in-argentina/

 

I think I have labryinths...somewhere. I'll have to dig it out.

Nancy

 

Start posting October over in the new Oct-Dec Thread.

 

- Indonesia -Oeroeg, by Hella Haasse http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11076797
This book's story takes place in Indonesia, but the author is Dutch so it could also be counted for The netherlands. But I have chosen Indonesia for this one and I have stil another book by tho author to be read.

 

- Indonesia -Oeroeg, by Hella Haasse http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11076797
This book's story takes place in Indonesia, but the author is Dutch so it could also be counted for The netherlands. But I have chosen Indonesia for this one and I have stil another book by tho author to be read.


Got this one in the Jul-Sept list. Onward to the next list! I'll bump it so it floats above this one.

 

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11411520

I started reading it in Urology clinic and finished it today. It is 24C and I did some work in the yard. It was a beautiful day today. I released the book for the You're Such an Animal Challenge.

 

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