A question or two for Danish, Swedish and Norwegian members

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- How would you say 'Woo hoo', 'Yeehaw' or 'Yippie!' in your language? I'm looking for something that people might shout when they are, for example, jumping into a swimming pool. An expression of fun or joy.

- If there is a group of Danish, Swedish and Norwegian people, and I want to address them in writing in a language that all of them can understand, but I can only use one language... should I be using Danish, Swedish or Norwegian?

Any help is gratefully accepted!

 

'Woo hoo', 'Yeehaw' or 'Yippie!'

In Norwegian I'd say:
Yippie = Jippi
Woo hoo = Juhu
Yeehaw = Well, not sure how to spell out this one in Norwegian at the moment....

- If there is a group of Danish, Swedish and Norwegian people, and I want to address them in writing in a language that all of them can understand, but I can only use one language... should I be using Danish, Swedish or Norwegian?


As a Norwegian, I'd say that either of those languages are fine. BUT as a Norwegian, I find it easier to read Danish than Swedish.

My guess is that Danes might find Norwegian easier to read than Swedish, due to the simalarities in the languages. But how easy they find it to read Norwegian or Swedish, I won't make any speculations about. (The Danes aren't very active here...:( )

When it comes to the language preference for Swedes, I leave that to our Swedish members.

 

So... do you happen to see any mistakes in the text inside this image?
https://d3nc0ar6dmrp7n.cloudfront.net/---/28762791.jpg
It's for a Very Secret Project, so I can't tell you more, I'm sure you'll understand... 😉

 

So... do you happen to see any mistakes in the text inside this image?
https://d3nc0ar6dmrp7n.cloudfront.net/---/28762791.jpg
It's for a Very Secret Project, so I can't tell you more, I'm sure you'll understand... 😉


Looks fine with me!

 

Looks fine with me!

Thank you so much!

 

So... do you happen to see any mistakes in the text inside this image?
https://d3nc0ar6dmrp7n.cloudfront.net/---/28762791.jpg
It's for a Very Secret Project, so I can't tell you more, I'm sure you'll understand... 😉


Actually, I would word that text a bit differently. Mind you, I'm very nit picky, as I read a lot of textual information in my job. I would have said:

"Jippi!
Jeg er ei bok som reiser omkring! Gå inn på BookCrossing.com og se hvor jeg har vært. Så leser du meg og slipper meg fri!"

 

"Jippi!
Jeg er ei bok som reiser omkring! Gå inn på BookCrossing.com og se hvor jeg har vært. Så leser du meg og slipper meg fri!"

Sounds pretty good to me! But then I don't read Norwegian... Can you describe how it's different? For example, why was it 'en bok' before but now it's 'ei bok'?

 

Correct written in norwegian: en bok.
The article represents the gender of the word. Your text is in Norwegian Bokmål. The word "Bok" is a male word and correct article "a book" is "en bok".
If your text had been written in Norwegian Nynorsk, the word "Bok" is a femal word, an correct article is "ei bok".

My english is not so good, but I do hope I managed to give you an explanation.
Good luck with your project!

 

The article represents the gender of the word. Your text is in Norwegian Bokmål. The word "Bok" is a male word and correct article "a book" is "en bok".
If your text had been written in Norwegian Nynorsk, the word "Bok" is a femal word, an correct article is "ei bok".


Well, "bok" can be both masculine and feminine in bokmål. And only feminine in nynorsk.

https://ordbok.uib.no/---/ordbok.cgi?...

 

"Jippi!
Jeg er ei bok som reiser omkring! Gå inn på BookCrossing.com og se hvor jeg har vært. Så leser du meg og slipper meg fri!"

Sounds pretty good to me! But then I don't read Norwegian... Can you describe how it's different? For example, why was it 'en bok' before but now it's 'ei bok'?


The substantive "bok" is feminine, but it's officially OK to write it as masculine. So, it's technically not incorrect to use "en bok", just a tad bit more correct to use the feminine form, in my (not very humble) opinion.

 

- If there is a group of Danish, Swedish and Norwegian people, and I want to address them in writing in a language that all of them can understand, but I can only use one language... should I be using Danish, Swedish or Norwegian?


As a Norwegian, I'd say that either of those languages are fine. BUT as a Norwegian, I find it easier to read Danish than Swedish.


I'm a Norwegian as well, and I personally find Swedish easier than Danish! I think it's rather individual. I grew up with Swedish books and Swedish telly. I sometimes have a hard time understanding my Danish cousins (when they speak), though no problem understanding my Swedish friends and relatives.

 

I'm a Norwegian as well, and I personally find Swedish easier than Danish! I think it's rather individual. I grew up with Swedish books and Swedish telly. I sometimes have a hard time understanding my Danish cousins (when they speak), though no problem understanding my Swedish friends and relatives.


My initial response was about the written languages; where I find Danish easier to understand than Swedish. But it comes to spoken language, I find Swedish easier to understand than Danish in many cases.

 

I'm a Norwegian as well, and I personally find Swedish easier than Danish! I think it's rather individual. I grew up with Swedish books and Swedish telly. I sometimes have a hard time understanding my Danish cousins (when they speak), though no problem understanding my Swedish friends and relatives.


My initial response was about the written languages; where I find Danish easier to understand than Swedish. But it comes to spoken language, I find Swedish easier to understand than Danish in many cases.


Yes, but I do find Swedish by far easier to read than Danish. As I said, this would be rather individual. For me, Danish feels like reading an old text and something I have to drag myself through. Swedish is just lighter and easier.

 

My spontaneous translation of these expressions into Swedish would probably be:
Yippie = Jippi
Woo hoo = Tjoho
Yeehaw = Jiha (or possibly Ji-ha) (I use this word occasionally but I'm not sure all Swedes do, and I do not use it as often as the first two.)

As for your second question, oh - that feels a bit tricky to answer.
For me personally if I was to choose between reading in Norwegian or Danish, I'd choose Norwegian every day of the week! But I like to read books in Norwegian. As for other random Swedes I think more of us would prefer Norwegian; at least that's what I get when I talk to people about neighbour languages. But it's also my experience that many Swedes think they understand Norwegian better than they actually do. I've got the impression that Norwegians generally understand the Swedish language better than the other way around, (but this is only an impression, I don't really have anything back it up with).

 

As for other random Swedes I think more of us would prefer Norwegian; at least that's what I get when I talk to people about neighbour languages.

Thank you. That is good to know. We're dealing with a pretty short and simple text here.

 

"Jippi!
Jeg er ei bok som reiser omkring! Gå inn på BookCrossing.com og se hvor jeg har vært. Så leser du meg og slipper meg fri!"

Sounds pretty good to me! But then I don't read Norwegian... Can you describe how it's different? For example, why was it 'en bok' before but now it's 'ei bok'?


Generally, the text suggested is less formal than the original.

Many (or all?) feminine words in Norwegian can be masculine as well. 'Ei bok' is feminine, 'en bok' is masculine. The masculine version is a bit more formal than the feminine. By using the feminine version, the text becomes less formal and more 'oral'.

 

"Jippi!
Jeg er ei bok som reiser omkring! Gå inn på BookCrossing.com og se hvor jeg har vært. Så leser du meg og slipper meg fri!"

Sounds pretty good to me! But then I don't read Norwegian... Can you describe how it's different? For example, why was it 'en bok' before but now it's 'ei bok'?


Generally, the text suggested is less formal than the original.

Many (or all?) feminine words in Norwegian can be masculine as well. 'Ei bok' is feminine, 'en bok' is masculine. The masculine version is a bit more formal than the feminine. By using the feminine version, the text becomes less formal and more 'oral'.


I kind of agree with you. It's more oral. Less formal.
In my opinion is that why the text should use "en bok".
It's an official BC information text, at least, that's what I think it is :)

But its not an important issue, not to me. We all understand the text, no matter which article you choose to use. - Only since you asked us why "ei" not "en". You've got an answer :)

 

You've got an answer :)

Yes, I did, thank you! So interesting!

 

Generally, the text suggested is less formal than the original.

Many (or all?) feminine words in Norwegian can be masculine as well. 'Ei bok' is feminine, 'en bok' is masculine. The masculine version is a bit more formal than the feminine. By using the feminine version, the text becomes less formal and more 'oral'.


I disagree. I have throughout my many years of work life written a LOT of formal text, and I always go for the feminine. I was taught the feminine use in school, back in the 80's. Call me old fashioned, but I AM a bit of a language geek (have even studied languages). I would not say the feminine form is more oral than the masculine.

 

I would chose Swedish then Norweigan and as the last Danish. However I often find Danish easier to read than Norweigan, I have to read it outloud to here it sometimes.

 

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