2021 Never Judge a Book by Its Cover Release Challenge: 1st Quarter

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https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16130269/. Chimera by John Barth

 

"For instance, the week’s theme might be ... or ... or ... or authors named Christopher."

Sounds familiar? Sure, this sentence was part of each quarter's introducing post for many years. But did it ever happen? No! So... if you stored one of those books all the time just in case it would happen, now it's finally the time to get that book out.

Since "Christopher" is actually just the english variant of greek "Χριστόφορος" ("Christóforos", "the Christ bearer"), I'll accept every other variant of this name as well, like german Christoph, french Christophe, latin Christopherus or hawaiian Kilikopela.

You can find an incomplete list of variants at
https://en.wikipedia.org/---/Christopher#Cognates_in_other_languages

First, middle or last name, whatever.

NB: The most registered Christophers in the BC database are Christopher Paolini and Christopher Moore.

 

winghyphen8wing 3 mos ago
Good one!
"For instance, the week’s theme might be ... or ... or ... or authors named Christopher."

Sounds familiar? Sure, this sentence was part of each quarter's introducing post for many years. But did it ever happen? No! So... if you stored one of those books all the time just in case it would happen, now it's finally the time to get that book out.

Since "Christopher" is actually just the english variant of greek "Χριστόφορος" ("Christóforos", "the Christ bearer"), I'll accept every other variant of this name as well, like german Christoph, french Christophe, latin Christopherus or hawaiian Kilikopela.

You can find an incomplete list of variants at
https://en.wikipedia.org/---/Christopher#Cognates_in_other_languages

First, middle or last name, whatever.

NB: The most registered Christophers in the BC database are Christopher Paolini and Christopher Moore.

I have a John Christopher book somewhere....

Sounds like you want Christopher and linguistic variants but NOT abbreviations (so no Chris, Kit, etc.) or feminine versions (Christine in all its various spellings) - is that correct?

FWIW, I've never heard of anyone named Kilikopela...but Kawika (David) and Keoki (George) are quite common.

 

Sounds like you want Christopher and linguistic variants but NOT abbreviations (so no Chris, Kit, etc.) or feminine versions (Christine in all its various spellings) - is that correct?

Christine, Christiane and their variants are definitely not variants of Christopher, but of Christian, which is a different name with a different meaning and origin. The male form may be a bit uncommon in english speaking countries for being spelled the same as the noun? In central and northern Europe, Christian or the nordic spelling Kristian is a very common first name. The member of a religious group is called "Christ" in German, so it's not identical here.

From a german point of view, I hadn't considered Chris being a short form for Christoph(er) either, but rather of Christian. A common short form for the female form Christine is Stine. So this question took me bit by surprise.

Anyway, I would restrict it to "definitely Christopher". They are not very common, but not too rare that it would be impossible to obtain one. I haven't got one in my stock myself, which I would release, but I'm rather confident to find a copy of "Eragon" or "The gospel according to Biff" somewhere during the week ;)


FWIW, I've never heard of anyone named Kilikopela...but Kawika (David) and Keoki (George) are quite common.

I saw this in the wikipedia list and thought it would be fun to include. I wouldn't expect anyone to actually use this variant ;)

 

Christine, Christiane and their variants are definitely not variants of Christopher, but of Christian, which is a different name with a different meaning and origin.

That makes sense.

The male form may be a bit uncommon in english speaking countries for being spelled the same as the noun?

I've known a number of people named Christian, although most of them went as Chris.

From a german point of view, I hadn't considered Chris being a short form for Christoph(er) either, but rather of Christian. A common short form for the female form Christine is Stine. So this question took me bit by surprise.

In my experience, Chris can be for Christopher, Christine, or Christian. Most of the Christophers I've known use Chris. Overall, it's definitely easiest to keep this week's releases to just "Christopher" and the variants you mentioned. A lot less confusion that way.

...I'm rather confident to find a copy of "Eragon" or "The gospel according to Biff" somewhere during the week ;)

In the USA it's usually titled "Lamb". :)

 

In my experience, Chris can be for Christopher, Christine, or Christian. Most of the Christophers I've known use Chris.

Makes sense. Christoph(er) isn't a very common name these days in Germany and there are many more people named Christian, so it's probably just for lack of Christophs that people nicknamed Chris are usually Christians. Chris for female Christine has happened, but since Chris is considered a male name, doesn't seem common to me.

Fun fact: I grew up in a Christophstraße (Christoph Street), named after a local 16th century duke:
https://en.wikipedia.org/---/Christoph,_Duke_of_W%C3%BCrttemberg

...I'm rather confident to find a copy of "Eragon" or "The gospel according to Biff" somewhere during the week ;)

In the USA it's usually titled "Lamb". :)

Ok :-) I found both titles but didn't look up which one is the common one. The longer title is closer to the german "Die Bibel nach Biff". We had a copy in our LFL recently, but I took it out and sent it off as a wishlist book about two weeks ago.

I found a mystery novel written by some Christoph already yesterday in a public bookshelf. Together with an IMHO honest wild catch: A BC book which had been released a few months before in another village by another BC member and somehow moved there on its own.

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16132184 - Christopher McDougall
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16132183 - Christopher Geraghty

This tested my limits a bit, I have hundreds of to be read and read books around, I found one for this challenge and a few minutes later found another, but it was the same as the first., I often forget and get books if I think I would like them. During this search this morning I found 3 double ups, which will help with shelf space. The second book I found on the last possible shelf.
When I saw the Greek lettering I was a bit concerned for my ability to survive this month.

 

"For instance, the week’s theme might be ... or ... or ... or authors named Christopher."

Sounds familiar? Sure, this sentence was part of each quarter's introducing post for many years. But did it ever happen? No! So... if you stored one of those books all the time just in case it would happen, now it's finally the time to get that book out.

Since "Christopher" is actually just the english variant of greek "Χριστόφορος" ("Christóforos", "the Christ bearer"), I'll accept every other variant of this name as well, like german Christoph, french Christophe, latin Christopherus or hawaiian Kilikopela.

You can find an incomplete list of variants at
https://en.wikipedia.org/---/Christopher#Cognates_in_other_languages

First, middle or last name, whatever.

NB: The most registered Christophers in the BC database are Christopher Paolini and Christopher Moore.

I have a C. M. in my TBR stack, will release it this wk, as I have found other authors I like better

 

 

Metallic foil
wild releases with photo

2. foil series title & accents - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16113568
3. foil title & accents - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16113560

 


http://bookcrossing.com/---/14666942 Tricki Woo (James Herriot)
Released: 2018-07-15 type GEOC at DE:BW:-- GeoCaches -- | Auf den ... gekommen (GC1RDTQ)
Caught: 2021-01-05 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: NJ2018-27

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15829017 Lektüre zwischen den Jahren 1987: Über die Freundschaft (Hans-Ulrich Müller-Schwefe (Hrsg))
Released: 2020-12-30 type WILD at DE:BW:Filderstadt | Harthausen
Caught: 2021-01-05 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: NJ2020-52

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000213 Emil und die Detektive (Erich Kästner)
Released: 2020-12-28 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Aichtal | Aich - Bücherschrank Heideweg
Caught: 2021-01-08 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: D_for_December-2020, NJ2020-52

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15988905 Freitag (Robert A. Heinlein)
Released: 2020-08-16 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Blumberg | Bücherbaum Blumberg
Caught: 2021-01-09 by Gluecksfuss (Newbie)
Challenges: NJ2020-32, OneWord-2020

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000520 Gedenke mein (Inge Löhning)
Released: 2021-01-04 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Pliezhausen | Bücherbrett an der Viereckschanze
Caught: 2021-01-10 by Stella_67 (Newbie)
Challenges: NJ2021-01

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000174 Bedenke, was du tust (Elizabeth George)
Released: 2020-12-20 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Aichtal | Aich - Bücherschrank Heideweg
Caught: 2021-01-17 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: D_for_December-2020, NJ2020-51

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000438 Tödliches Erbe (Amanda Cross)
Released: 2021-01-16 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Pliezhausen | Bücherbrett an der Viereckschanze
Caught: 2021-01-17 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: NJ2021-03

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000144 Verheißene Erde (James A. Michener)
Released: 2021-01-21 type WILD at DE:BW:Nürtingen | Bahnhof Nürtingen
Caught: 2021-01-21 by MagellanX (Newbie)
Challenges: NJ2021-03

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000139 Komm und küss mich! (Susan Elisabeth Phillips)
Released: 2020-11-11 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Aichtal | Grötzingen - Bücherregal am Helenenheim
Caught: 2021-01-30 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: Eless-2020, NJ2020-41

 

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13888068 Mirror Lake by Thomas CHRISTOPHER Greene

 

1. Socrates Cafe by CHRISTOPHER Phillips, https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16132932
2. Under the Eye of the Clock by CHRISTOPHER Nolan,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16136304

 

After the rather challenging search for Christophers we'll have an easy theme this week, with quite a number of options:

---> Horses and their close relevants in the Equidae family, real or not <---

Equidae include horses, donkeys, and zebras. There are also a number of extinct species, and you can count fantasy creatures too, if you can make it plausible that they, would they be real, would be classified as Equidae. Specifically, unicorns and pegasi are just horses behind all the magic stuff, aren't they? So:

- Picture of a horse or other member of the Equidae family (real or not), or

- Any word in the main title that defines an Equidae member as above, like mule, foal, pony, stallion, unicorn, 千里马, or specific breeds.

The creature doesn't need to be alive. A toy horse, an equestrian statue or a nativity scene with a donkey will do.

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16137529 - Horses in background
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16137530 - Back cover shown as no horses on front cover

 

 

 

 

Authors named Christopher
wild release with photo

1. author John CHRISTOPHER - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16113566

 

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112292 Christopher Davis
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112254 Christopher Paolini
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112280 Christopher Ross
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112177 Christoph Güsken

Not counting a fifth by a "Christophe" - I had already registered the book with the LFL account, so it's not on my private shelf. Moved it into the LFL anyway :)

 

 

Horses & other equines
LFL release with photo

1. Freddy and the Ignormus - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16113510
horse on cover

 

1. The Black STALLION by Walter Farley,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16138215
2. Cinderellis and the Glass Hill by Gail Carson Levine,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16138212
3. War HORSE by Michael Morpurgo,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16138210

 

1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15441293 Wyoming Winter (picture of horse on front cover)

 

 

Did you expect a Valentine's day theme? Well, in this case you'll probably be disappointed. It's still about the same day, anyway: This weekend is the weekend before lent in western christian tradition - also known as carnival, or "the fifth season" in many countries. Carnival is most commonly celebrated in traditionally catholic areas, however, often adapted in other regions as well; and in many places it's the largest public event of the year. In "normal" years, that is. This year, probably not.

There are many different traditions about carnival celebrations. However, most of them involve masquerades of some kind, street parades, and insane amounts of alcohol drowning every remaining bit of sanity. While the latter seems to be the real common theme of all events, I prefer to stick to the former ;-) Our theme will be:

--------> masks <----------

You may release books with masks on the cover, or mask, masquerade or similar words in the title.

Any kind of mask counts: Theater, carnival, a masked villain, a knights helmets visor, or this season's worldwide megatrend: medical masks. Anything that's supposed to cover the face, worn or not.

Examples:
https://bookcrossing.com/---/12753442
https://bookcrossing.com/---/16000864
https://bookcrossing.com/---/15245021
https://bookcrossing.com/---/16000346
https://bookcrossing.com/---/13284217

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16143032 - surgeon with mask hanging from neck
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16143031 - surgeon with mask

 

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15250802 Strike Back (Soldiers wearing balaclava's)

 


http://bookcrossing.com/---/15556563 horse
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15890645 historical scene with several riders on horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15920179 title: Stealing Horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000156 carriage drawn by horse
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000360 silhouette of a horse with rider, title: The rider on the white horse
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000393 donkey, title: The little donkey Grisella
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000535 historical scene with horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000733 title: The HORSE which hunted the buzzard
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000942 horse
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112220 horses, title: Attention, horse thiefs!
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112232 knights on horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112244 horses, title: The horse whisperer
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112250 wooden horse, title: The big book of little steed Hü
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112293 two horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112305 horse, title: Anja, Petra and the horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134514 four horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134525 several horses
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134546 horse
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134578 horse, title: The dream horse of my life

 

Releasing this one late for week 6 (horses):
The Perfect Distance by Kim Abalon Whitney (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16144501), jumping horse on cover

and these for week 7 (masks):
1. The Curious Affair of the Third Dog by Patricia Moyes (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16144502), dog wearing some type of muzzle/mask on cover
2. Star Wars - The Force Awakens by Pablo Hidalgo (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16144504), Kylo Ren wearing face shield on cover

 

1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15719894 Inside the Resistance (person on cover with a face covering)

 

1. Finding Buck McHenry by Alfred Slote,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16145180
2. The Book of the Lion by Michael Cadnum,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16145147

 

Sunday is "International Mother Language Day" as proposed by UNESCO, so it's probably a good day to do "something with languages". Or their written representation, the alphabets:

Now - the latin alphabet has how many letters? 26? That's probably what most of us learned in school. It's not true, though. The original latin alphabet as used by the Romans had only 20 letters, and many languages consider additional letters being part of their alphabet. Most of those are typographical variants of the base letters, adding so called diacritics: little hooks, bars, a dot or two, a circle or whatever typographers agreed to. Many of these originate from having drawn two previously independent characters together until one of them almost disappeared (Ö, Ø and Œ have all once been OE), others mark hyphenation (Zoë) or accentuation. Icelandic even incorporated a nordic rune into the latin alphabet (Þ).

This week we will search for those little special characters on our books. To make it independent from the language of the actual copy, we will only search in the author names. So our theme is:


----> Diacritics and local characters in author names <-----


The author name must include a diacritical character, i.e. a "modified" letter with an accent of any kind; or any other letter outside of the respective base alphabet.

Examples:
Emily Brontë, Åke Edwardson, Gabriel García Márquez, Arnaldur Indriðason, Peter Høeg, Otfried Preußler, Wisława Szymborska.

The book may be registered to the BC database differently. If you spelled it "Bronte", it's ok, she won't be able to complain anyway.


Note: Æ, Œ and ß are, although commonly described as ligatures, considered distinctive letters in their respective languages, they count. Stylistic ligatures like "ffi" are, however, just the letters f,f,i in a different style, and the apostrophe in O'Someone is an apostrophe, not a letter - unless it comes in the old irish form of "Ó Someone", of course.

It might sometimes make a difference whether the name is written in uppercase or lowercase (german ß = SS, turkish i = İ but I = ı), or there may be variants of the same name (Jean Girauds pseudonym occurs as Møbius, Mœbius or Moebius). You may always use the variant on the cover OR a "correct" spelling as found e.g. on wikipedia, as you like.

And with this, I have finished my first block of four weeks and hand over to NancyNova :-)

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147058 - see characters when you go to book
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147060 - Emily Bronte - I scanned the book spine to show the author.

 

2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147060 - Emily Bronte - I scanned the book spine to show the author.

What pretty decorations on the book spine!

 

2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147060 - Emily Bronte - I scanned the book spine to show the author.

What pretty decorations on the book spine!

It was one of a set.
This was really hard for me, my book collection is pretty firmly Australian, so not that many 'different' names, though with our level of immigration that should change.

 

----> Diacritics and local characters in author names <-----

Whee! Making sure to put the "challenge" back in this release challenge! ;)

And with this, I have finished my first block of four weeks and hand over to NancyNova :-)

Thank you!

 

----> Diacritics and local characters in author names <-----

Whee! Making sure to put the "challenge" back in this release challenge! ;)

Is it really so hard? I have matching english editions in my own stock (but probably won't release them now)... hadn't really checked against the BC database how common they are, though.

Well, I do know that US people seem to stick to US authors much more than people from other countries prefer their respective local authors. However, there are a few diacritical characters even in the names of a number of english-writing authors - the Brontë family probably being the most famous, but I have seen a number of books by american Zoës myself.

Generally, latin american and scandinavian authors seemed to be a good source to me.

Now that I look at the list of most registered authors at BC, it looks like the theme is really more difficult than I had believed. The most common authors (with more than 0.1% of all books) are probably John le Carré and Gabriel García Márquez.

 

Is it really so hard?

When I looked at the theme, I thought this was hard. However, I have found a book that qualifies. The week we had authors named Christopher was harder for me. I have none! And due to lockdowns here, I could not go to a used book store to search one out!

 

Is it really so hard?

When I looked at the theme, I thought this was hard. However, I have found a book that qualifies. The week we had authors named Christopher was harder for me. I have none! And due to lockdowns here, I could not go to a used book store to search one out!

I got lucky on the Christopher week because I had ONE book with Christopher as a surname. Still on the lookout for another for the redo week...

 

Now that I look at the list of most registered authors at BC, it looks like the theme is really more difficult than I had believed. The most common authors (with more than 0.1% of all books) are probably John le Carré and Gabriel García Márquez.

I'm not a fan of the homogenization and dumbing down of US culture but it's real: I think prior to maybe 2000 or so it was fairly rare to see diacritical markings in author names for books published here. For example, I suspect most older US editions say Bronte rather than Brontë.

Nowadays they're a bit easier to find but still far from common.

..

Also, I have a couple that are to be read...and so not available to be released yet! :p

 

I'm not a fan of the homogenization and dumbing down of US culture but it's real: I think prior to maybe 2000 or so it was fairly rare to see diacritical markings in author names for books published here. For example, I suspect most older US editions say Bronte rather than Brontë.

Since Brontë is the "official" and usual spelling you can use any book by anyone from this family, no matter how the publisher spelled it.

The effect you describe can be observed in Germany as well, but the change probably came a few decades earlier. For example, I have seen many (old) editions of norwegian classics printed with german "ö" instead of norwegian "ø". It's nowadays considered (politically) incorrect to change a name from another language so you don't see this any more for names in latin script, but this hasn't always been the case.

Another interesting topic in this context would be transcriptions from non-latin scripts - probably always good for a flamewar between the friends of "we always spelled it so" and "this different spelling comes closer to the original sound", just as well as between using worldwide recognized english transcriptions versus creating one based on the local pronunciation. It's sometimes really difficult to recognize authors of books published by the "as close as possible to the original sound" group ;)

 

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16061116 jean pare' accent on the e not sure how to do it on the puter

 

accent on the e not sure how to do it on the puter

You can always try and enter the name as you have it into a search engine of your choice - it will usually return a version with diacritics ready for cut&paste with the first few results. Wikipedia works fine for this as well, as long as there is an article about the author. BC itself is sufficiently Unicode proof as well.

 

accent on the e not sure how to do it on the puter

You can always try and enter the name as you have it into a search engine of your choice - it will usually return a version with diacritics ready for cut&paste with the first few results. Wikipedia works fine for this as well, as long as there is an article about the author. BC itself is sufficiently Unicode proof as well.

Yes, I do search + cut & paste most of the time. :)

 

Is it really so hard?

When I looked at the theme, I thought this was hard. However, I have found a book that qualifies. The week we had authors named Christopher was harder for me. I have none!

I knew it was difficult and I promise not to stick to such difficult themes ;)

In the BC database, about 0.35% (about one out of 300 books) qualified for the Christopher week.
I can't tell about the diacritics, because too many books are registered with different spellings (i.e. ignoring the diacritics) to make a good statistics. However, the four or five most common matching authors already sum up to the same amount, so the number is definitely much higher.

And due to lockdowns here, I could not go to a used book store to search one out!

I'm lucky that there are a number of rather large public bookshelves (LFL) around, which I can haunt for matching books. If I put in serious effort, I can access a stock of several thousand books this way which isn't affected by the lockdowns.

 

I'm lucky that there are a number of rather large public bookshelves (LFL) around, which I can haunt for matching books. If I put in serious effort, I can access a stock of several thousand books this way which isn't affected by the lockdowns.

We have a few LFLs around here, but they are small, some with not too many books inside. I also found that last week some are a bit snowbound due to storms last week so are difficult to access.

 

Is it really so hard?

When I looked at the theme, I thought this was hard. However, I have found a book that qualifies. The week we had authors named Christopher was harder for me. I have none!

I knew it was difficult and I promise not to stick to such difficult themes ;)

In the BC database, about 0.35% (about one out of 300 books) qualified for the Christopher week.
I can't tell about the diacritics, because too many books are registered with different spellings (i.e. ignoring the diacritics) to make a good statistics. However, the four or five most common matching authors already sum up to the same amount, so the number is definitely much higher.

And due to lockdowns here, I could not go to a used book store to search one out!

I'm lucky that there are a number of rather large public bookshelves (LFL) around, which I can haunt for matching books. If I put in serious effort, I can access a stock of several thousand books this way which isn't affected by the lockdowns.

I have a LFL and I am struggling to be on the top 100 list, how in the heck can you have registered 43 thou, well done!

 

I have a LFL and I am struggling to be on the top 100 list, how in the heck can you have registered 43 thou, well done!

Well... it started the other way round for me, anyway. There were those many books people wanted to throw away and then I discovered BC and decided to rescue as many as I can and release them instead... ;-)

Most books which I have registered are unsold leftovers of two different charity sales, up to six events per year. These have of course been cancelled in 2020, but when the crisis started I still had lots of stock from there and I still haven't registered them all - although what's still stored in the basement are now mostly nonfiction books which I usually hesitate to register.

Another source is a free shop where I volunteer with a large book section. Although we have cancelled the regular opening times, we still open the shop by appointment. Donations still keep coming in and we need to sort out overstock regularly.

Additionally, there are often boxes of books for free on the streets ("Take it, what's left in the evening is thrown away"), and sometimes I pick a bagful from an overfull public bookcase to move them somewhere else - usually books that probably won't be taken from where they are but are good enough for wild releasing, or where I believe that the chance for them to find a reader is much higher at some other bookcase I can visit. Also, the public bookshelves are really of some help when searching for something for a more obscure NJABBIC week :) There are a number of such shelves in surrounding settlements where I can combine a visit into regular necessary trips. For example, the one at Nürtingen is only two minutes walking from the railway station where I often have to wait half an hour for my connecting train or bus. Better to kill the time by walking over to the bookcase and looking for something new than waiting at the bus terminal among the aggressive teens and drunk adults who "live" there, isn't it?

NB: Private frontyard LFL are rather uncommon in Germany. The typical public bookshelf is set up as community project at a more or less central place in a village or suburb and usually not too small. One common type are for example rebuilt old phone boxes with between 5 and 10 linear meters of shelf space.

 

I have a LFL and I am struggling to be on the top 100 list, how in the heck can you have registered 43 thou, well done!

Well... it started the other way round for me, anyway. There were those many books people wanted to throw away and then I discovered BC and decided to rescue as many as I can and release them instead... ;-)

Most books which I have registered are unsold leftovers of two different charity sales, up to six events per year. These have of course been cancelled in 2020, but when the crisis started I still had lots of stock from there and I still haven't registered them all - although what's still stored in the basement are now mostly nonfiction books which I usually hesitate to register.

Another source is a free shop where I volunteer with a large book section. Although we have cancelled the regular opening times, we still open the shop by appointment. Donations still keep coming in and we need to sort out overstock regularly.

Additionally, there are often boxes of books for free on the streets ("Take it, what's left in the evening is thrown away"), and sometimes I pick a bagful from an overfull public bookcase to move them somewhere else - usually books that probably won't be taken from where they are but are good enough for wild releasing, or where I believe that the chance for them to find a reader is much higher at some other bookcase I can visit. Also, the public bookshelves are really of some help when searching for something for a more obscure NJABBIC week :) There are a number of such shelves in surrounding settlements where I can combine a visit into regular necessary trips. For example, the one at Nürtingen is only two minutes walking from the railway station where I often have to wait half an hour for my connecting train or bus. Better to kill the time by walking over to the bookcase and looking for something new than waiting at the bus terminal among the aggressive teens and drunk adults who "live" there, isn't it?

NB: Private frontyard LFL are rather uncommon in Germany. The typical public bookshelf is set up as community project at a more or less central place in a village or suburb and usually not too small. One common type are for example rebuilt old phone boxes with between 5 and 10 linear meters of shelf space.


tnx for the reply, do to covid I can only stock my LFL and get books to register from it. Oh yeah, I order from Amazon also, as I need more books in my life lol

 

tnx for the reply, do to covid I can only stock my LFL and get books to register from it. Oh yeah, I order from Amazon also, as I need more books in my life lol

Well, as long as there are no stupid and counterproductive state orders forbidding it, I won't stop going out and releasing books. Wild releasing and haunting public bookshelves is an outside activity after all. Unless people start spitting at another's faces, The risk of getting hit by a falling lamp at home is probably higher than of getting infected on the way to a LFL.

Btw, I try not to buy from Amazon - I don't want to feed a mega-rich mega-company that refuses to pay taxes and disregards even the legal minimum standards of employee rights, while pressurizing publishers into selling them the books at prices they can't live from. "Funny" enough, it's often even cheaper to buy somewhere else - Amazon is really greedy. The fees for used book sellers selling through Amazon are effectively several times higher than on other platforms at least in the EU (can't tell for non-EU).

 

Good for you! I won’t buy anything from Amazon either. In fact, I try not to buy junk made in China. It is difficult but I try to buy local. I actually closed my Facebook and Instagram accounts as well. I never was on Twitter. I decided to focus on the present and people around me. This, of course, does not include Bookcrossing.

 

This was a tough one! The only one I could come up with is Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, so I am releasing that into my Little Free Library Nina's Book Nook:
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147933

 

1. The Honourable Schoolboy by John LeCarre,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147693
2. Zlata's Diary by Zlata Filipovic,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147690
3. The Marriage Feast by Par Lagerkvist,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147686

I don't know how to print non-standard characters in bookcrossing, so you will have to look at the release notes. (You might not be able to see the non-standard character on Zlata's Diary, but it is there on the book that I released.)

 

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15122741 Happy People Read and Drink Coffee by Agnès Martin-Lugand

 

 

 

such as Christina Baker Kline https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14542024/
or Adeline Yeh Mah https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13783327/

Multipart names where the preposition is separated from the last name by a space, such as van or de, are fine too: Example is Alain de Botton https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14489792/

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16151270 - Susanna De Vries
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16151271 - Ambrose Mungala Charimeri

Thanks Nancy Nova, timing perfect for me. If I don't have a book in my bookshelves, I can look during my shift in the op shop later in the morning.

 

Question :)

What about...
- double names written with a dash, like "Alberto Vázquez-Figueroa" or "Hans-Otto Meißner"?
- initials which are not written out on the cover, like "P. D. James" or "Pearl S. Buck"?
- more than three words? I found some with four ;-)

?

 

Question :)

What about...
- double names written with a dash, like "Alberto Vázquez-Figueroa" or "Hans-Otto Meißner"?
- initials which are not written out on the cover, like "P. D. James" or "Pearl S. Buck"?
- more than three words? I found some with four ;-)

?

Hyphenated first names or surnames is fine. Initials - no - that's coming up later in the year, so hold on to that tip.

More than three words is fine also - I'll be curious to see what you found.

 

More than three words is fine also - I'll be curious to see what you found.

First of all, there's "Johann Wolfgang Goethe" versus "Johann Wolfgang von Goethe". Both variants are correct: The "von" is a nobility title, similar to british "Sir", and the most notorious bighead of german literature acquired that title only later during his lifetime. It's kind of random whether the "von" is used or not on a specific edition. Myself, I usually register the books without the "von" since I'm neither a fan of old nobility nor of Goethe himself.

I also found one with four actual names in the morning but don't have it close to the computer at the moment and can't remember the name.

 

Multipart names where the preposition is separated from the last name by a space, such as van or de, are fine too: Example is Alain de Botton https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14489792/

This may take a little research to find out.

BC tends to try to eliminate the space in Charles de Lint. I've also seen it happen for Ursula K. Le Guin. But that's what search engines are for. :D

 

BC tends to try to eliminate the space in Charles de Lint. I've also seen it happen for Ursula K. Le Guin. But that's what search engines are for. :D


I was going through my books, when I realized I should toss the "de" in to give the challenge a little more scope. I have no idea if BC has ever condensed it - the search fails most of the time any more, so I type everything in.

 

BC tends to try to eliminate the space in Charles de Lint. I've also seen it happen for Ursula K. Le Guin. But that's what search engines are for. :D


I was going through my books, when I realized I should toss the "de" in to give the challenge a little more scope. I have no idea if BC has ever condensed it - the search fails most of the time any more, so I type everything in.


BC did some really weird stuff to books in the database at a specific point back in May 2010. Many books which have been registered before that date are now in the database with wrong author names, either wrongly spelled or even swapped with another author, although they had once been registered correctly.

For books that have been registered later than May 2010, BC only tends to destroy capitalization and possibly a few special characters for authors, also categories, ISBN and pictures may get changed unrequestedly, but disregarding case, the author in the database is the one you registered the book with. If you want Ursula K. Le Guin, just enter Ursula K. Le Guin and BC will NOT change it to LeGuin. If you have LeGuin, you probably did that yourself.

Remember, there is no reason to leave nonsense delivered by Amazon or Google unchanged if it's wrong. Amazon is not a omniscient goddess whose doctrines Must Not Be Questioned Or Otherwise You Will Go To Hell. You won't go to heaven for believing into Amazon either. Amazon is nothing but a multi-billion-company which firmly believes that paying people for keeping their databases correct is cutting too much into their profit. I'll never understand why BC uses the buggy search for bugs via Amazon instead of just searching in the own database...

 

4. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16148085

 

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16150379 shown on my cover not the listed one
with Joshua David Stein

 

Pictures missing for some of them. Mea culpa.

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000346
Medical staff with surgery masks

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134568
Medical staff with surgery masks

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000991
knight with helmet with closed visor

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134557
title: Die Schandmaske = the shame mask
I failed finding an appropriate translation for this word - it seems that this object hasn't been in use in english speaking countries. It's a tool of ancient punishment: the sentence was that the convict had to wear some mask (usually depicting an animal and illustrating the offense) in public. The book is actually a translation from english, original title is "The Scold's Bridle" - which is a similar punishment tool, but not quite the same, even targeted to different "crimes".

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134559
Fasnet¹ mask on cover, title: Wilde Masken = wild masks
Nonfiction book about masks in southwestern german carnival¹ tradition.
(¹ southwestern german carnival is called "Fasnet" or "Fasnacht" - never use "Karneval" here, that would be an insult ;-) )
Pic: It's the same edition as https://www.booklooker.de/---/isbn=9783925340581

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134570
Jester mask on cover

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15777675
Indian mask on cover

 

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142413 Alberto Vázquez-Figueroa
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16042050 Anne Delbée
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134564 Arnaldur Indriðason
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142432 Benoîte Groult
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134596 Carlos Ruiz Zafón
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134548 Christa Schütt
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134592 Christine Brückner
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142403 Christine Brückner
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142394 Deana Zinßmeister
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000351 Emmanuèle Bernheim
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112175 Federico García Lorca
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134565 Françoise Sagan
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000882 Friedrich Dürrenmatt
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15143834 Friedrich Hölderlin
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134536 Gabriel García Márquez
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15999305 Günter Grass
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000903 Hanna Sörensen
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134541 Ildikó von Kürthy
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142436 Irène Némirovsky
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142430 Jaume Cabré
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142386 Jorge Semprún
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142439 Jörg Mehrwald
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15880062 Jörg Steiner
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142463 Lotte Kühn
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16139715 Natasha Mac a'Bháird
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142459 Patrick Süskind
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142449 Peter Härtling
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000196 Peter Rühmkorf
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142396 Robert Löhr
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15645900 Silja Bembé
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15993910 Volker Klüpfel
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134560 Volker Klüpfel
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142426 Volker Klüpfel
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134582 Zoé Valdés
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134576 Zsuzsa Bánk

 

I kind of figure you had a lot of books like that - as for me, not a single one at the moment

 

I kind of figure you had a lot of books like that - as for me, not a single one at the moment

It was of course easier for me given that german language has diacritical characters itself. However, one half of the books I released include diacritical characters not used in German, so I think I didn't use that advantage too much.

 

1. Shabanu by Suzanne Fisher Staples, https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16152012
2. The Sweet Potato Queens' Book of Love by Jill Connor Browne,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16152006
3. Nory Ryan's Song by Patricia Reilly Giff,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16152000
4. Sweatshop Warriors by Miriam Ching Loon Louie,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16152005
5. Ireland by Lisa Gerard-Sharp, https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16152003

 

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13842593 the Department of Lost and Found by Allison Winn Scotch

 

List created semiautomatically. May be inaccurate.
(BC*) marks an inactive BCer - i.e. someone who didn't show any activity for at least half a year before journaling the book.
(BC) marks an active BC member.

http://bookcrossing.com/---/12851343 Oskar Igels Winterfreund (Sally Ann-Rytter, Søren Rytter)
Released: 2015-10-24 type GEOC at DE:BW:-- GeoCaches -- | Meistersberg - Kuckucksfelsen (GC20E6A)
Caught: 2021-02-08 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: NJ2015-42

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000853 Winterkartoffelknödel (Rita Falk)
Released: 2021-01-07 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Tübingen | Bücherkasten am Buchcafé Raban im Französischen Viertel
Caught: 2021-02-10 by mariama (BC*)
Challenges: NJ2021-01

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15940069 Tunnel zu den Sternen (Robert A. Heinlein)
Released: 2020-09-12 type OBCZ at CH:ZH:Winterthur | Bücherschrank Unterer Deutweg
Caught: 2021-02-12 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: NJ2020-36

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15155103 Im Land der letzten Dinge (Paul Auster)
Released: 2018-10-05 type WILD at AT:OÖ:Gmunden | Traunsee-Ostufer (Unterm Stein bis Miesweg)
Caught: 2021-02-15 by Judy1984 (BC*)
Challenges: NJ2018-39

http://bookcrossing.com/---/11776086 Der Elefantenreiter (Malcolm Bosse)
Released: 2013-08-28 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Tübingen | Bücherbaum Bebenhausen
Caught: 2021-02-15 by Uhabo (Newbie)
Challenges: NJ2013-34

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15900271 Der Hauptschlüssel (Masako Togawa)
Released: 2020-10-02 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Weil der Stadt | Büchertelefonzelle am Kinder- und Jugendbüro, Jahnstraße
Caught: 2021-02-15 by JanneSonnenster (BC)
Challenges: 52-towns-2020, NJ2020-39

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15961945 Sturm über dem Kaukasus (Barbara Bartos-Höppner)
Released: 2020-10-02 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Weil der Stadt | Büchertelefonzelle am Kinder- und Jugendbüro, Jahnstraße
Caught: 2021-02-15 by JanneSonnenster (BC)
Challenges: NJ2020-39

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000200 Wüstenblume (Waris Dirie)
Released: 2020-10-02 type OBCZ at DE:BW:Weil der Stadt | Büchertelefonzelle am Kinder- und Jugendbüro, Jahnstraße
Caught: 2021-02-15 by JanneSonnenster (BC)
Challenges: NJ2020-39

http://bookcrossing.com/---/15556563 Fuhrmann Henschel (Gerhart Hauptmann)
Released: 2021-02-06 type WILD at DE:BW:Dettenhausen | Tankstelle Autohaus Schopp
Caught: 2021-02-18 by AnonymousFinder
Challenges: NJ2021-06

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142430 Die Stimmen des Flusses (Jaume Cabré)
Released: 2021-02-25 type WILD at DE:BW:Nürtingen | Neckartalradweg
Caught: 2021-02-25 by tosa13 (BC*)
Challenges: NJ2021-08

 

I'm not sure if mine is technically correct, but I'm going to release this book I just finished for my book club into my LFL:
The Chicken Sisters by KJ Dell' Antonia (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16157128)

 

I'm not sure if mine is technically correct, but I'm going to release this book I just finished for my book club into my LFL:
The Chicken Sisters by KJ Dell' Antonia (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16157128)

I just read that too, as an e-book. It highlighted the elements of reality TV that I despise, but it was still a fun story. And set in Kansas, which is helpful. :)

 

 

6. A Sense of the Morning by David Brendan Hopes,
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16156757

 

1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15719902 Little Farm in the Ozarks by Roger Lea MacBride
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16155964 Fish Out of Water by Mary Janice Davidson
3. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15719904 Heaven, Texas by Susan Elizabeth Phillips
4. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15691473 Miracles and Mysteries: The Halifax Explosion by Mary Ann Monnon

 

The cover should show a picture of something you can travel on or in; such as an airplane or car (in) or a bicycle (on)

Have fun traveling virtually!

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16158660 - Motor Bike
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16158661 - Vintage car

The covers are not consistently showing on my bookshelf, tho are there when
I register the book. Fingers crossed they come through

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16158660 - Motor Bike
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16158661 - Vintage car

The covers are not consistently showing on my bookshelf, tho are there when
I register the book. Fingers crossed they come through

Looking good to me!

 

The cover should show a picture of something you can travel on or in; such as an airplane or car (in) or a bicycle (on)


Vehicles only, or do animals being ridden also qualify?

 

Vehicles only, or do animals being ridden also qualify?

Thanks, I totally forgot to ask that yesterday...
Adding the question about other non-standard vehicles like a sheet of ice clearly used for traveling in the story ;)

Btw: I already released a book with a man riding a hen, whether it will count or not - has a place name in the title, too, so I'd probably have released it anyway.

 

Btw: I already released a book with a man riding a hen, whether it will count or not - has a place name in the title, too, so I'd probably have released it anyway.

Yes, I released a book with people riding a dragon: it qualifies for a couple of other challenges so I can either count it for this challenge too...or not.

 

The cover should show a picture of something you can travel on or in; such as an airplane or car (in) or a bicycle (on)


Vehicles only, or do animals being ridden also qualify?

vehicles only, horses were in a previous week and other critters may make an appearance later this year

 

I am releasing the following books into my Lackey Little Free Library:

1. Hog Pilots, Blue Water Grunts by Robert D. Kaplan - airplane on cover (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16159226)
2. Amelia Bedelia Means Business by Herman Parish - bicycle on cover (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16159236)
3. A to Z Mysteries - The Yellow Yacht by Ron Roy - yacht on cover (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16159239)
4. The Magic School Bus Inside the Human Body by Joanna Cole & Bruce Degen - bus on cover (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16159245)
5. My Book of Things That Go! by Crayola, Creative Edge - truck, jeep and plane on the cover (https://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/16159252)

 

Masks
LFL release with photo

1. The Palace of Love - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16144224
person wearing mask

wild release with photo

2. Can Holding in a Fart Kill You? - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16113569
helmet/mask

 

Author names with diacritical markings
LFL release with photo

1. Pam Muñoz Ryan - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16147659

 

Three-part author names
wild release, no photo

1. Orson Scott Card - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16151980

wild release with photo

2. Joan Walsh Anglund - https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16159354

 

http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142413 Alberto Vázquez-Figueroa
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151814 Alexa Hennig von Lange
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151820 Alexander Lernet-Holenia
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151866 Alfred Edmund Brehm
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134532 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151875 Barbara Bartos-Höppner
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151845 Barbara Taylor Bradford
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151858 Christine Marion Fraser
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151826 Dorinde van Oort
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151810 Emine Sevgi Özdamar
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16108843 Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142417 Erik Fosnes Hansen
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000421 Friedrich von Schiller
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15870773 Hans Dieter Stöver
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000443 Hans-Otto Meissner
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000782 Hans-Ulrich Treichel
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151879 Ildikó von Kürthy
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151815 Janwillem van de Wetering
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151871 Janwillem van de Wetering
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151878 Jens Peter Jacobsen
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151837 Johann Wolfgang Goethe
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15961968 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151850 John Dickson Carr
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151860 John Dickson Carr
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134580 Joseph von Eichendorff
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151876 Joyce Carol Oates
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151830 Karen Marie Moning
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134549 Karin Feuerstein-Prasser
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112559 Klaus-Peter Wolf
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142397 Klaus-Peter Wolf
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15757173 Lilian Jackson Braun
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15757180 Lilian Jackson Braun
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15757184 Lilian Jackson Braun
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134492 Lilian Jackson Braun
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16134517 Marie Louise Fischer
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142402 Marie Louise Fischer
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16142404 Marie Louise Fischer
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16000093 Marion Zimmer Bradley
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151844 Marion Zimmer Bradley
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151854 Mary Ann Shaffer
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151855 Petra Durst-Benning
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151825 Richard Lee Marks
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112229 Rochelle Majer Krich
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151851 Samuel Eliot Morison
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16110697 Shilpi Somaya Gowda
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151867 Shirley Ann Grau
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15829614 Simone de Beauvoir
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16151838 Susan Elizabeth Phillips
http://bookcrossing.com/---/15890677 Tahar Ben Jelloun
http://bookcrossing.com/---/16112252 Tahar Ben Jelloun

 

 

1. Across America on an Emigrant Train, https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10358823

 

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14578553 This Must Be The Place (airplanes on cover)

 

Days of Grace https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14718549/ airplanes on the cover
Letourneau's Used Auto Parts https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13432970/ car on the cover

 

1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16159100 Here Lies the Librarian (vintage car)
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15719856 More Toronto Sketches (vintage cars and streetcar)
3. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/15719868 Trains and Lovers (train)

 

 

This weekend, US Daylight Savings Time starts in most states, so time to go around the house and spring-forward the non-internet connected timepieces.

So, this week you're looking for a picture of something that keeps time on the cover, such as a watch, hourglass, clock, etc.

Have fun!

 


1. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16168272 - Wristwatch (on arm)
2. https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/16168281 - Hourglass - this book is about
an IVF experience (explaining the title)

 

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