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Arrow of God
by Chinua Achebe | Literature & Fiction
Registered by Vasha of Ithaca, New York USA on 5/23/2010
Average 8 star rating by BookCrossing Members 

status (set by Tubereader): to be read


6 journalers for this copy...

Journal Entry 1 by Vasha from Ithaca, New York USA on Sunday, May 23, 2010

This book has not been rated.

This novel was one of the readings for a comparative religion class I took twenty years ago. I recall it impressed me, but no details. — Vasha

Set in Nigeria in 1921, this novel tells how the elderly Ezeulu, an Ibo community’s polygamous high priest, endeavors to adapt to the power of the white colonial officials (whose black messenger terms him “witch-doctor”). In a bitter comedy of errors, an attempt by a well-meaning English District Officer to declare him an accredited chieftain results in his humiliation by a white deputy and his black emissary. Thereafter, Ezeulu seeks to humiliate his community by postponing an impending harvest day; the people then turn away from him to the Christian mission, which encourages timely harvesting. Ezeulu withdraws into “the haughty splendor of a demented high priest.”

The interest of
Arrow of God lies partly in the novel’s subtle plotting and largely in the vivid rendering of the complexities of the evolving indigenous society. We see how diversely the people respond to the challenges of colonialism. Ezeulu’s community maintains traditional celebrations and intimate rituals, but also sanctions the ubiquitous exploitation of women by men; lepers are scorned; its religion veers between the profoundly intuitive and the superstitiously silly. Achebe’s intelligent objectivity extends to the British community, too. If one official is naïvely arrogant, another tries to be fair-minded. If the English colonialists cause cultural disruption, they also terminate tribal warfare and build schools, roads, and hospitals. Achebe reminds us that British imperialism, however culpable, was far more constructive than the African imperialism of the nineteenth-century Benin dynasty.

Achebe writes with wit, humor, sharp realism, and imaginative empathy. His prose is refreshingly original, pungently spiced with translated idioms (“Unless the penis dies young it will surely eat bearded meat”), and coolly ironic.
— Cedric Watts in 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
 


Journal Entry 2 by 1001-library at Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland on Friday, May 28, 2010

This book has not been rated.


Thanks so much for your donation Vasha!

This book is now part of the 1001-library. If you want to take this book from the library but don't know how to proceed, please refer to the 1001-library bookshelf.
 


Journal Entry 3 by wingbookstogivewing at Springville, Tennessee USA on Tuesday, June 15, 2010

This book has not been rated.

I am adopting this 1001-Library book for storage. It is available for check-out! 


Journal Entry 4 by 1001-library at Helsinki, Uusimaa / Nyland Finland on Tuesday, June 15, 2010

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This book is now back on the 1001 library bookshelf and can be borrowed by PMing svoight:)

If you want to take this book from the library but don't know how to proceed, please refer to the library bookshelf.
 


Journal Entry 5 by wingbookstogivewing at Bagarmossen, Stockholm Sweden on Wednesday, May 25, 2011

This book has not been rated.

Released 7 yrs ago (5/25/2011 UTC) at Bagarmossen, Stockholm Sweden

CONTROLLED RELEASE NOTES:

Released to a fellow 1001-Library member, enjoy! 


Journal Entry 6 by VictoriaWagtail at Bagarmossen, Stockholm Sweden on Friday, June 03, 2011

This book has not been rated.

Thank you so much Bookstogive for sending this book to me, very generous! I'm very much looking forward to reading this book, i haven't read anything by Chinua Achebe yet but I have many of his books on my whishlist. Maybe this will be the first one? 


Journal Entry 7 by VictoriaWagtail at Bagarmossen, Stockholm Sweden on Wednesday, December 26, 2012

8 out of 10

Just like Tings Fall Apart this is a very interesting read about the clash of cultures in Nigeria as brittish colonial rule is imposed there. But most of all I belive it is an acount of what was before the arrival of the brittish, the history of southern Nigeria almost erased as christianity and a west-influenced lifestyle became the norm.

What impresses me most is Achebe's blended role as an historian and story teller. He describes the language, the religion and rites and the social structures in a very convincing way. But also in a very loving way, but still he is not blind to the effects of an extremely patriarchal and hierarchical society. And unlike so many other male writers Achebe is not only ABLE to write about women, children and non-alpha males, he even seemes genuinely interested in their thoughts and in their destinies in a patriarchal society and don't leave them out of the story.

This was truly a great book but, in my oppinion, not as great as Things Fall Apart. The theme of the two books is almost the same but as litterature Things Fall Apart was a little bit mor well-crafted whereas this book was a little too long. But it was still great and well worth reading.

I'm planning to start a ray on this book, see the forums for more info. Pm me if you want to join.
Participants:
1. ETMadrid
2. Tubereader
3. Anyone else?
 


Journal Entry 8 by VictoriaWagtail at Bagarmossen, Stockholm Sweden on Monday, January 07, 2013

This book has not been rated.

Released 5 yrs ago (1/7/2013 UTC) at Bagarmossen, Stockholm Sweden

CONTROLLED RELEASE NOTES:

Happy reading! :) 


Journal Entry 9 by ETMadrid at London, Greater London United Kingdom on Tuesday, January 15, 2013

This book has not been rated.

Thank you! This is with me now. My current book is going to take me a while, but as soon as I can, I'll start this. 


Journal Entry 10 by ETMadrid at London, Greater London United Kingdom on Saturday, March 23, 2013

8 out of 10

The writings of this author are must-reads for all anthropologists. The setting is fascinating. It is one thing to admire the costumes and sense of rhythm when watching a traditional tribal dance or ritual on television, and quite another to see it from the inside as one gets to do by reading these pages.

Just yesterday this great author sadly passed away. 


Journal Entry 11 by ETMadrid at Fitzrovia, Greater London United Kingdom on Friday, April 05, 2013

This book has not been rated.

Released 5 yrs ago (4/5/2013 UTC) at Fitzrovia, Greater London United Kingdom

CONTROLLED RELEASE NOTES:

Posted today - sorry for the delay. 


Journal Entry 12 by Tubereader at Fuente El Saz de Jarama, Madrid Spain on Monday, May 13, 2013

This book has not been rated.

The book has finally arrived! Something must have happened at the post office as I have been away for a few days and there were 5 books waiting for me, all of them posted to me quite a while ago... So it will be a bit of time till I get round to reading all of them... Will keep my profile updated as I make my way through them. 


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