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Romulus, My Father
by Raimond Gaita | Biographies & Memoirs
Registered by livrecache of Hobart, Tasmania Australia on 1/27/2007
Average 7 star rating by BookCrossing Members 

status (set by livrecache): permanent collection


4 journalers for this copy...

Journal Entry 1 by livrecache from Hobart, Tasmania Australia on Saturday, January 27, 2007

7 out of 10

Romulus Gaita fled his home in his native Yugoslavia at the age of 13, and came to Australia with his young wife Chistine and their four-year-old son soon after the end of the Second World War. Tragic events were to overtake them. Raimond Gaita has an extraordinary story to tell about growing up with his father amid the stony paddocks and flowing grasses of country Australia.

(Signed author copy)

I was saving this for the bios and memoirs bag, but it won't fit.

Sending to tqd as her happy smile day book (once I've finished reading it, as the film inspired me to pick it up again). (13 August )) 


Journal Entry 2 by livrecache from Hobart, Tasmania Australia on Wednesday, August 15, 2007

This book has not been rated.

I've read this up to where the film finished, and I'm finding that I'm just not interested any more. As I have a couple of of other books to send to tqd, I'll send this with them.

Happy smile day, tqd. I'll be interested to hear your comments (eventually!). 


Journal Entry 3 by livrecache at By post in Melbourne, a controlled release -- Controlled Releases on Thursday, August 16, 2007

This book has not been rated.

Released 10 yrs ago (8/16/2007 UTC) at By post in Melbourne, a controlled release -- Controlled Releases

WILD RELEASE NOTES:

RELEASE NOTES:

Sending to tqd as the winner of the August Happy Smile Day draw. 


Journal Entry 4 by tqd from Sydney, New South Wales Australia on Sunday, August 19, 2007

This book has not been rated.

Thanks livrecache, it turned up this morning (braving wild and wet weather in Sydney) safe and sound with your other books (eep, so many bookrings, so little time...), and with another few from the RABCK sweepstake. I thought the insanity was slowing down given that no books turned up last Friday, but, nope, they were just all hanging out together at the Post Office before turning up en masse, obviously.

I look forward to finding the time to read this one! And the actual reading, of course.

And thanks crimson-tide for organising the sweepstake!

UPDATE 16 Apr 2008: Reserved for freelunch for the May Southern Cross exchange. 


Journal Entry 5 by tqd from Sydney, New South Wales Australia on Monday, May 19, 2008

7 out of 10

Sorry that you didn't finish this one, livrecache, I actually managed to finish it in one day (over a couple of sittings). It was quite interesting: dry and dispassionate at times, but relating some amazing stories of passion, and then every now and then a big dollop of moral philosophy.

Okay, I could have done without the moral philosophy (and I studied philosophy at Uni as an undergraduate, but, yes, that was a while ago now). It was obviously important to Gaita, both as a philosopher himself, and because a strong moral basis was so fundamental to his father's outlook and life. And that is fascinating: I don't think I've ever met anyone who is so upright and consistent in his morals.

I was very curious about Gaita's mother, her story obviously had far more that could have been told. Absolutely tragic at times, and completely unexplained! Granted, she was an absent mother, and Gaita wasn't about to write anything that he couldn't verify directly, but I wish we'd had more of her story.

Also, it is definitely a portrait of growing up in an earlier age of Australia, which was quite fascinating. (And three cheers for multiculturalism!)

Thanks for this one, livrecache. I'll be sending it to freelunch for the May Southern Cross. I hope he enjoys it too!

UPDATE 23 May 2008: And in the post to freelunch today. Happy reading! 


Journal Entry 6 by freelunch from Cairns, Queensland Australia on Monday, May 26, 2008

8 out of 10

received today, thanks very much tqd :o)

I read this bookring'd copy of Romulus, My Father a couple of months ago, also in a single day, and I really enjoyed it.

a week or so later I sat down with my wife to watch the awful film adaptation, after which the book went on my wishlist for a copy for my wife to read.

I've added it to her TBR stack (it might be there a while) 


Journal Entry 7 by freehand from Cairns, Queensland Australia on Saturday, April 18, 2009

8 out of 10

I see glimpses of my own father and his peers in Romulus - the focal point of this book. An "show and tell" of morals, values, virtues, hardwork and kinship. A good read. Ignore the film version. 


Journal Entry 8 by freelunch from Cairns, Queensland Australia on Monday, May 11, 2009

This book has not been rated.

rather than let this autographed copy drift out of the bookcrossing system I shall pop it in the post back to livrecache today... 


Journal Entry 9 by livrecache from Hobart, Tasmania Australia on Wednesday, May 20, 2009

This book has not been rated.

Welcome home, inscribed book. Thank you to the 'free' people for returning it to me. I shall read it right through shortly, now that the film is a very distant memory. I've met the author a couple of times since, and I expect to do so again soon (friend of a mutual friend) and it would be nice to be able to seem intelligent about at least one of his books. I have The Philosopher's Dog yet to read too.

Thanks to everyone who took part in this ring. 


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