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Alas, Babylon (Perennial Classics)
by David Brin, Pat Frank | Literature & Fiction
Registered by UrbanSpaceman of Kingston upon Thames, Greater London United Kingdom on 6/5/2006
Average 9 star rating by BookCrossing Members 

status (set by sesame-seven): available


2 journalers for this copy...

Journal Entry 1 by UrbanSpaceman from Kingston upon Thames, Greater London United Kingdom on Monday, June 05, 2006

This book has not been rated.

This book is part of the following of my reading list projects:

* David Pringle's 100 Best SF Novels [#29]
 


Journal Entry 2 by UrbanSpaceman from Kingston upon Thames, Greater London United Kingdom on Tuesday, August 08, 2006

This book has not been rated.

Pat Frank, a journalist with considerable expertise in nuclear matters, wrote this book in the late 1950s, in part, to try to convey the dangers of a nuclear war to the American population at that time. It was so well-thought of that it was recommended reading for Civil Defence officials for whom the idea of near total destruction of civilisation would have been a very new concept.

Alas, Babylon a very well-conceived and well-written book. The backdrop is a nuclear war between the USA and the USSR in 1959. Most of the war takes place off screen, though, and the focus of the book is on the small town of Fort Repose in Florida, which has been spared the worst effects of the war. The story looks at the events and reactions of the population immediately after and for the year following 'The Day', primarily through the eyes of Randy Bragg, an initially unfocussed lawyer and Korean veteran who grows into being the leader of the community.

Along the way, some other themes are explored, most notably that of race relations. Before 'The Day' segration along race lines is an exvery day occurence (although Randy is obviously uncomfortable with this). After, 'The Day' though, this starts to dissolve as everyone is compeeled to work together.

The book is enhanced by an Foreword by author David Brin and some biographical notes on Pat Frank and an Afterword by Hal Hager.


 


Journal Entry 3 by sesame-seven from London, Greater London United Kingdom on Tuesday, August 08, 2006

This book has not been rated.

Retrieved at the Stamford Arms, London meetup of the OBCZ.

Don't know why I first picked this up - the cover attracted me the texture of the book itself did not - it's very pliable.

Still on recommendation from UrbanSpaceman I now have it and it will soon be read - the toberead pile by my bed has been tidied away.

Well I enjoyed Stranger in a Strange Land recently (see my library) - and I guess this is of a similar era. Still have Dark Sun by Richard Rhodes sitting at my elbow waiting to be read.

Enough of my ramblings - I cannot compete with the earlier entry for this book...

 


Journal Entry 4 by sesame-seven from London, Greater London United Kingdom on Monday, September 11, 2006

9 out of 10

Really enjoyed this. First book in a long time where I found myself thinking about the book and the characters for some days after I finished it.

Have passed it on to a colleague - hope he appreciates more than the last one I gave him. 


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