corner corner NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and How to Think Smarter About People Who Think Differently


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2 journalers for this copy...

Journal Entry 1 by LittleSuz from Edinburgh, Scotland United Kingdom on Sunday, December 17, 2017

7 out of 10

From the Inside Flap

Winner of the 2015 Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction

A New York Times bestseller

Foreword by Oliver Sacks

What is autism: a devastating developmental condition, a lifelong disability, or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is all of these things and more - and the future of our society depends on our understanding it.

Following on from his groundbreaking article 'The Geek Syndrome', Wired reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years.

Going back to the earliest autism research and chronicling the brave and lonely journey of autistic people and their families through the decades, Silberman provides long-sought solutions to the autism puzzle while casting light on the growing movement of 'neurodiversity' and mapping out a path towards a more humane world for people with learning differences. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. 


Journal Entry 2 by LittleSuz at Edinburgh, Scotland United Kingdom on Sunday, December 17, 2017

8 out of 10

I wish I'd written a review of this after first finishing it a couple of months ago. I had a lot of thoughts about it at the time, but now I've forgotten most and I need to write this entry in a rush!

But this is a fascinating exploration of the history of autism. As a former history student I can see plenty to criticise (very selective use of evidence, poor referencing, a teleological view of the subject whereby all changes over time are merely 'advances' towards a particular worldview).

But this isn't really a history book. It's a manifesto for neurodiversity and seeks to place autism within human society and history rather than being something to be hidden away or 'cured'.

Warning: parts of the narrative are extremely upsetting to read with detailed descriptions of child abuse. But it is a very worthwhile read. 


Journal Entry 3 by LittleSuz at Filmhouse Cinema in Edinburgh, Scotland United Kingdom on Sunday, December 17, 2017

This book has not been rated.

Released 10 mos ago (12/17/2017 UTC) at Filmhouse Cinema in Edinburgh, Scotland United Kingdom

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Old Gang meetup

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Journal Entry 4 by wingCassandra2020wing at Roslin, Scotland United Kingdom on Monday, December 18, 2017

This book has not been rated.

Picked up at Old Gang Meetup and destined for my obcz - thank you 


Journal Entry 5 by wingCassandra2020wing at The Glencorse Centre in Auchendinny, Scotland United Kingdom on Friday, January 19, 2018

This book has not been rated.

Released 9 mos ago (1/10/2018 UTC) at The Glencorse Centre in Auchendinny, Scotland United Kingdom

WILD RELEASE NOTES:

Released to obcz

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