corner corner Future Perfect (Blueprint Trilogy)

Medium

Future Perfect (Blueprint Trilogy)
by Katrina Mountfort | Literature & Fiction
Registered by curlykats of York, North Yorkshire United Kingdom on 8/20/2017
Average 7 star rating by BookCrossing Members 

status (set by LouiseB79): available


2 journalers for this copy...

Journal Entry 1 by curlykats from York, North Yorkshire United Kingdom on Sunday, August 20, 2017

This book has not been rated.

I am the author of this book so don't think it would be fair for me to rate it. Hope it's enjoyed by many readers! 


Journal Entry 2 by curlykats at Brigantes Bar & Brasserie OBCZ / Meetup Venue in York, North Yorkshire United Kingdom on Sunday, August 20, 2017

This book has not been rated.

Released 4 wks ago (8/22/2017 UTC) at Brigantes Bar & Brasserie OBCZ / Meetup Venue in York, North Yorkshire United Kingdom

WILD RELEASE NOTES:

This book has been released by its author - happy reading! 


Journal Entry 3 by LouiseB79 at York, North Yorkshire United Kingdom on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

This book has not been rated.

Picked up at the York BookCrossing meetup  


Journal Entry 4 by LouiseB79 at York, North Yorkshire United Kingdom on Monday, September 04, 2017

7 out of 10

The first thing to say is that I've never written a review of a book in the knowledge that the author would be reading it. Quite a bit of pressure!

In summary, in a not too distant future, most of the population of the world lives in enclosed Citidomes and sexual reproduction is forbidden. But Caia, who doesn't fit the tall, thin androgynous mould that society encourages, starts to question the way things are when she falls for a masculine-looking, free-thinking colleague called Mac.

The idea of an androgynous future or alternative world has been done before, by Ursula Le Guin and Marge Piercy amongst others, but it is usually presented as a desirable, positive concept in those novels. In Future Perfect, sexual dimorphism is the suppressed natural order and androgyny is slightly sinister. It's a view which is currently out of fashion so it's quite brave to base a futuristic novel on it.

I did enjoy the book on the whole. Caia is an appealing heroine, although Mac is a bit of a mansplaining type. The world on which the story is set is well-realised and the backstory is revealed gradually so it doesn't get too exposition-y.

On the other side, some of the novel seemed to be a bit rushed and episodic, and I thought the overall tone was more suited to the YA market.

Thank you, curlykats, for bringing the book in! I'll be taking it back to BookCrossing next month and passing it on to another reader. 


Are you sure you want to delete this item? It cannot be undone.