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Talking to Girls About Duran Duran: One Young Man's Quest for True Love and a Cooler Haircut
by Rob Sheffield | Biographies & Memoirs
Registered by wingMoody-Bluewing of Meers, Oklahoma USA on Friday, August 05, 2011
Average 7 star rating by BookCrossing Members 

status (set by Moody-Blue): to be read


1 journaler for this copy...

Journal Entry 1 by wingMoody-Bluewing from Meers, Oklahoma USA on Friday, August 05, 2011

This book has not been rated.

Purchased used from Amazon.com 


Journal Entry 2 by wingMoody-Bluewing at Campbellsville, Kentucky USA on Sunday, October 30, 2011

7 out of 10

Rob Sheffield is a writer for Rolling Stone, so he knows music and he knows how to craft a story. Sometimes this is book a bit more memoir-y than I might like, but he does do a good job of explaining why particular songs meant so much or taught him something at certain points in his coming-of-age. What didn't work for me so much is the specific line-up of songs because he's four years older than I am and a great number of them are from 1982 -- right before I started listening to pop music. Also, he spends a lot of time debating whether or not groups and/or songs are "new wave" which -- even though he described the genre in great length -- I still don't understand. Guess he would have considered me a "poseur" since I simply liked a song or didn't, regardless of its deeper meanings and intentions.

On the plus side... It's fun to catch him quietly weaving lyrics in as narrative. I also enjoyed being reminded of a song and looking it up on YouTube to hear it or watch the video again. I loved the chapter about cassingles! (Kon Kan's "I Beg Your Pardon" will always be the best cassingle, IMO -- it was a great extended mix that they didn't play on the radio.) Anyway, throughout the book Sheffield weighs in on just about every musical act out there, which is usually interesting. (RE: Bon Jovi... "I'd trade their entire mature classic-rock phase for one chorus of 'Livin' on a Prayer'".)

Of course, the main thing I take away from this book is a desire to listen to and watch all of the Duran Duran I can get ahold of. I've been wanting to do that for a while anyway because I seem to recall that there's a really profound line about relationships in one of their songs, but I can't remember which one! It's so frustrating! I was hoping Sheffield would accidentally mention it, but I'm afraid I'll have to re-discover it myself... 




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