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March 1 - 4 What are you reading?

Tell us anything you want

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Tell us anything you want
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1. Sweet Revenge by Donna Davidson Mott -- a little over 1/2 done; this is the best of her books that I have read. It is available to anyone in the US if you want it

2. 52 Little Lessons From Les Miserables by Bob Welch 12/6/14 [188 pages] -- my pick up and put down book; I loved the book and the movies. I am going to keep this one.

3. Once Upon a Secret by Mimi Alford NF 9/19/17 audio -- listening to in my car; Mimi had an affair with President Kennedy when she was only 19. He seduced her and used her. I decided Kennedy was a predator.

4. The Highway by C. J. Box KTM audio 11/10/17 -- listening to this while I work around. Really enjoying it. It is the second in a new series so I need to find the first book. Will read this series in order.


ALL YEAR: Streams in the Desert by Mrs. Charles Cowman
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finished The Highway and began The Brain: The Story of You by David Eagleman
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My reads

The Minotaur Takes a Cigarette Break by Steven Sherrill
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14861738/
Not sure I’m in the right mood for this one. Will try a couple more chapters first. I was initially going to send it to the winner of a sweeps but I’m not sure, with the gritty look and feel of human nature, whether it would be well received or not. :/

Star Wars Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to a Galaxy Far, Far Away by Tim Leong
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14764033/
It’s just as it says: it’s a book full of graphics for A New Hope through The Force Awakens, including the Rebels and Clone Wars TV shows.

Happily Ever After edited by John Klima
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14663255/
A collection of fairytale retellings by some well-known authors. The Introduction is great! I also recently finished Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke. The story she submitted occurs in the same alternative history world but with a different cast of characters. This one will be a book read throughout the year.
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which is a a light women's read. The Fannin gals are out to get Carlene's lyin' cheatin' womanizing husband where it hurts - by beating his team in the annual Chili cookoff! Leftover from Plum's February what to read. It's also an ABC TBR that came from a bookbox, and will leave in a different theme bookbox - the food one this time, since there's a bit of Chili being cooked up.
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A new to me author. I'm about 60 pages in and I'm really liking it so far. About a woman who gets separated from her husband and 8 month old son while browsing an art gallery and then can't find them. Loving the author's style. My mom loaned this one to me, so I'm hoping she has the author's other books as well. Otherwise, I'm already pretty sure I'm going to have to hunt them down.
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Is a person’s life predetermined? If so, by what? The stars, prophecies, mystic predictions through tea leaves, watching the birds, searching through entrails? What if destiny were determined by someone’s name? How would a modern person live if they were named Adolf Hitler or Albert Einstein?

Excerpt:

Despite their differences in lifestyle, which have crippled communication, Alexander’s father knows his son is a smart man. Too eccentric, perhaps, to be acceptable—but very, very smart.

Smart enough to appreciate the backbone of the company, to dwell close within the marrow, directing firsthand the genius on his payroll. His enthusiasm helps. The employees like Alexander. They respect him, even though he knows they make fun of his name, his appearance. Lex Luthor in the flesh, they say. Our boss, the mad scientist. Does he keep kryptonite in his shorts? Ha. Ha. Ha.

Alexander blames his mother. She insisted on his name, on the dignity of its sound. Alexander wonders if he would be a different man if she had called him George or Simon or Larry. A name without myth or power. Without expectation.

But no, he is Alexander. He is Lex. And he has lived up to that name, in more ways than one.

End of excerpt.
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All Is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker. I received this novel for free through the giveaway program through Goodreads.

Since March is Women's History Month, I've chosen to read books written by women this month.
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Beyond Rue Morgue ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14610083/ ) is an anthology themed on Poe's "Dupin" character. The book opens with Poe's original "Murders in the Rue Morgue," and proceeds to a variety of tales by other authors - quite good so far!

Mystery in the Frozen Lands ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14896212/ ) is a fictional look at the search for the lost Franklin expedition, by a Canadian author - so it's going onto my books for this year's Canada Days release challenge.
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Having a little HP reread - I need one every now and then!
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For the March Book Battle Challenge
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'Just finished "The Colour of Water" by James McBride. Gosh.....one of the best books I've ever read. What lives they lived!
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First in this cozy series. Enjoying so far, still kinda in beginning of book. The owner of a bookstore/coffee shop serves coffee to a man who shortly thereafter dies outside the bookstore! I am liking the main character a lot.

This is on a wishlist so its a RABCK when done.
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Jude, a mortal teenager, tries to win a place in the High Court of Faerie where she and her sisters have lived since being kidnapped ten years ago--even if it means defying the youngest and wickedest son of the High King.
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Since last posting, I've been away for a few days, reading mostly light, holiday books on my Kindle :-)
I finished The Heart of the Garden by Victoria Connelly.
I read The Co-op's Got Bananas by Hunter Davies, the start of his memoirs, from his birth in 1936 to his marriage to Margaret Forster in 1960 - I have part two ready and waiting . . . .
Spring on the Little Cornish Isles: The Flower Farm by Phillipa Ashley
Lucy's Little Village Book Club by Emma Davies
The Queen's Mary by Sarah Gristwood.
I started The Spinster Wife by Christina McKenna but some of the bullying details got a bit unpleasant, not enough for me to quit, but enough to want a lighter alterntive,
so I also started Mycroft Holmes and the Case of the Bankers' Conclave by David Dickinson.
Now I'm home again I'll resume the paperback novel I didn't take away with me, Featherstone by Kirsty Gunn, a rather strange weekend in a small town
and my current nonfiction, The World of Samuel Pepys by Robert and Linnet Latham, extracts from the famous diary.
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so I also started Mycroft Holmes and the Case of the Bankers' Conclave by David Dickinson.

It wasn't long, more of a novella really, so I've finished it already. Nothing special but this series is OK.
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Now I'm home again I'll resume the paperback novel I didn't take away with me, Featherstone by Kirsty Gunn, a rather strange weekend in a small town

Finished it. Haunting and beautiful.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14886347
I'm going to start Hidden Depths by Ann Cleeves next, the third of her Vera mysteries.
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I'm going to start Hidden Depths by Ann Cleeves next, the third of her Vera mysteries

And I've already finished it. Gripping. I'm very impressed with this series.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14926355
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I started The Spinster Wife by Christina McKenna but some of the bullying details got a bit unpleasant, not enough for me to quit, but enough to want a lighter alternative,

With reluctance, because I've enjoyed other novels by this author in the past, I've had to abandon this one. I tried a couple more times since posting but I really didn't want to be there and I was less than half-way so there was still a lot more to come, I'm afraid!
I'm hoping that Me and My Sisters by Sinead Moriarty will take me to a far happier place for a while :-)
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by Nicola Pugliese. Loved it! If I tell you that there's a forty-page description of a newspaper reporter shaving, you'll think I'm nuts. It's really wonderful, and not all descriptive of the actual act of shaving, but his digressive thoughts about those four days of rain. There's a talking doll and coins that sing - but only to ten-year-old girls. The city of Naples is as much, if not more, a character than the people. The language, even in translation, is glorious. I admit it's not for everyone, but for those who like this kind of thing, it's the kind of thing you'll like.

I've begun The Lais of Marie de France, in a lovely, elegant prose translation, with the addition of three in the original language as well (somewhat understandable if you have a decent knowledge of even modern French, and read them out loud). This one fits nicely in my purse.

One that doesn't (a nearly 600-page hardcover) is Deborah Harkness' "Shadow of Night", second in her All Souls Trilogy. I enjoyed the first of the series ("A Discovery of Witches"), so I hope this is as good.

My non-fiction read is "Black Tudors: the Untold Story", by Miranda Kaufmann, about Africans in Tudor England, a subject not much discussed, but quite interesting.
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https://www.goodreads.com/---/32075853-erotic-stories-for-punjabi-widows

About to finish this. It's an OK read, a bit superficial and predictable, but it moves fast. It's about 430 pages long but one could easily read it in two afternoons...
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by 'peter Hoeg. Enjoying it and it has been very relevant over the past few days given the snow. however all gone now!
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however all gone now!

Lucky you!
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Strange that both books have Irish in them. They weren't chosen together on purpose.

A Lucky Irish Lad by Kevin O'Hara http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11807258 is a bio of this author's life. Quite enjoyable - no idea how it came onto my radar. It's an ABC TBR wishlist tag.

The Renegade Cowboy Returns by Tina Leonard on my Kindle. An Irish miss and her Mum on a ranch in New Mexico? Not the usual cowboy story for sure!
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It’s a cozy Victorian mystery written by a husband and wife team. The wife
is one of my favorite authors, Susan Wittig Albert.
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Who could resist a book with this title? Sigrid is having a conversation with her personal assistant, a robot that her daughter Erika assigned for her because she thinks her mother is getting a little dotty. Now Sigrid is going out at night to have a talk with the elves and she has a conversation with what she thinks of as a soulless machine.

Excerpt:

“Do you think Erika is happy?” Sigrid asked. “By herself? In town?”

“People who live alone can often be lonely,” the assistant said. “But they are also able to pursue their own goals outside of another’s schedule or expectations. They can develop themselves as they see fit. Statistically, the people who choose to live alone are the ones who express the most satisfaction with the arrangement. People who find themselves alone suddenly are much less likely to be happy.”

“Widows and widowers,” Sigrid said. “You know, I think this is the longest conversation we’ve ever had.”

“Are you enjoying it?”

Sigrid nodded. “Yes. Very much.”

“Then I am enjoying it as well.”

End of excerpt.
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I had this on my wishlist and now finally getting around to reading it :)
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I like to find somewhat unknown authors, (hence the amount of debut novels I read) and when I saw a review for this one on Twitter, I instantly ordered a copy.
With recent international hype about the (very good) debut novel "The Dry" by Jane Harper, I'm surprised Aussie mystery/thriller/crime fiction isn't getting more attention. It should be, and this one should be right up there.

Currently at the half way mark, with only a small suspicion as to the "who dunnit" culprit.
This is certainly very engaging, with some very relatable characters.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14941953/

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