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What are you reading Feb. 21 - 24?

Why are you reading the book? or anything you want to tell us.

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Why are you reading the book? or anything you want to tell us.
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1. The Last Fish Tale by Mark Kurlansky NF 12/29/11 [258 pages] - I picked this because I somehow had 2 copies. This way I can move 2 books off my shelf.

2. Bones of Betrayal by Jefferson Bass 12/29/11 [355 pages] -- over 1/2 done; reading so I can release for Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes release challenge

3. A Year In Providence by Peter Mayle 10/7/17 NF --reading so I can release for Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes release challenge

4. Once Upon a Secret by Mimi Alford NF 9/19/17 audio - a quick listen for my car.


ALL YEAR: Streams in the Desert by Mrs. Charles Cowman
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Finished The Last Fish Tale and started Aunt Dimity Down Under by Nancy Atherton. I picked this up because I wanted a lighter read after The Last Fish Tale.
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Finished Bones of Betrayal and will begin The Map of Heaven by Eben Alexander, M.D. Picked this one up as I read his other book and wanted a book I could pick up and put down.
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Finished A Year in Providence and began The Highway by CJ Box. I chose this book because I wanted something that was quick and easy to read
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By Karina Van Glaser
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Nonfiction, for my SIY Challenge, because I try to read at least 2 nonfictions a month, and because it fits plum's February reading theme: The World of Samuel Pepys by Robert and Linnet Latham, extracts from the famous diary - reading a few pages a day.

Modern classic novel, first published in 1936, because it was one of only two unread books in my possession registered by other BookCrossers and I like to give them priority to keep them moving: August Folly by Angela Thirkell.

Crime novel, the second of the Vera mysteries, because I decided to read the series from the beginning after being very impressed with the author at an event in York central library a couple of weeks ago: Telling Tales by Ann Cleeves - started it lunchtime and have hardly put it down since, gripping!

The next time I need a carrying-around novel, probably when I go to the hairdressers tomorrow, I'll started my oldest unread Kindle download: The Postcard by Fern Britton.
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Crime novel, the second of the Vera mysteries, because I decided to read the series from the beginning after being very impressed with the author at an event in York central library a couple of weeks ago: Telling Tales by Ann Cleeves - started it lunchtime and have hardly put it down since, gripping!

Finished it. Totally gripping. A real page-turner from start to finish. And I already have the third in the series waiting . . . .
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I may look for these books. Thanks for the recommendation
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The next time I need a carrying-around novel, probably when I go to the hairdressers tomorrow, I'll start my oldest unread Kindle download: The Postcard by Fern Britton.

Finished it during a sleepless night. OK, nothing special, easy holiday-style reading!
Next will be The Heart of the Garden by Victoria Connelly, an author whose books always entertain me :-)
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Modern classic novel, first published in 1936, because it was one of only two unread books in my possession registered by other BookCrossers and I like to give them priority to keep them moving: August Folly by Angela Thirkell.

Finished it. A pleasant story of love and family and a village play in the barn and a talking cat and donkey and . . . .
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12707130
Featherstone by Kirsty Gunn looks to be rather more intense - chosen from my TBR shelves because it fits plum's February reading theme; I can't remember how it came to be on the shelves in the first place!
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While out and about this afternoon, I found a BC-registered children's book in an old red telephone box and read it when I got home. Weird, decidedly weird!
Vortex Manor by Elaine Bamford
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14382736
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Full Wolf Moon by Lincoln Child
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I am giving this novel a perfect rating. It is very well written. An Untamed State by Roxane Gay is the first book I've read by Roxane Gay. I cannot emphasize enough what a fabulous writer Roxane Gay is. I will definitely be reading more of her works in the future.

All I can add is that An Untamed State is a very difficult book to read due to the topic of the novel. If you cannot stomach novels dealing with the topic of kidnapping, rape/gang rape, and violent assault that repeatedly happens to the main character in this novel and the aftermath of dealing with PTSD, then do not read this novel.
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Dan Barker took the subject of his book from a sentence Richard Dawkins stated in his work “The God Delusion”. In the first sentence of the second chapter, Dawkins has this to state about the Christian God.

“The God of the Old Testament is arguably the most unpleasant character in all fiction: jealous and proud of it; a petty, unjust, unforgiving control freak, a vindictive, bloodthirsty ethnic cleanser; a misogynistic, homophobic, racist, infanticidal, genocidal, filicidal, pestilential, megalomaniacal, sadomasochistic, capriciously malevolent bully.”

The chapters in Mr. Barker’s book tackle each of these descriptors. However, at the end of it he thinks that Mr. Dawkins may have left out a few things. (The capitalized words in the biblical passages are mine.)

Excerpt:

Richard’s nineteen denunciations are certainly more than enough to demonstrate the downright depravity of the Lord Jealous, but he overlooked a few more. He forgot to mention that the God of the Old Testament is also a pyromaniacal, angry, merciless, curse-hurling, vaccicidal, aborticidal, cannibalistic slavemonger.

In the Exodus story, the war god’s arsenal included death by drowning. Although he killed more people by water, including Noah’s flood, his independent acts of drowning were rare. He more often attacked with fire. The pages of the Old Testament are scorched by the flame-throwing blaze of his anger.

The phrase “burnt offering” appears more than 50 times in the Old Testament, too many to list here. Those roasted offerings are often described as a “pleasing odor” to the Lord. Beyond the blazing altars of animal sacrifice, here are more than eighty examples of the flame-happy god of the Old Testament.

EXODUS 9:22-24 “And the Lord said to Moses, ‘Stretch forth your hand toward heaven, that there may be hail in all the land of Egypt, upon man and beast and every plant of the field, throughout the land of Egypt.’ Then Moses stretched forth his rod toward heaven; and the Lord sent thunder and hail, and FIRE RAN DOWN TO THE EARTH. And the Lord rained hail upon the land of Egypt; there was hail, and FIRE FLASHING CONTINUALLY in the midst of the hail, very heavy hail, such as had never been in all the land of Egypt since it became a nation.”

EXODUS 24:17 “And the sight of the glory of the Lord was LIKE DEVOURING FIRE on the top of the mount in the eyes of the children of Israel.”

EXODUS 29:18 “And thou shalt BURN THE WHOLE RAM upon the altar: it is a burnt offering unto the Lord: it is a sweet savour, AN OFFERING MADE BY FIRE unto the Lord.”

LEVITICUS 1:9 “But his inwards and his legs shall he wash in water: and the priest shall burn all on the altar, to be a burnt sacrifice, an OFFERING MADE BY FIRE, OF A SWEET SAVOUR UNTO THE LORD.”

End of excerpt.

Naturally, I’m not going to list all the passages Mr. Barker has. But you get the idea.
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The History of Bees by Maja Lunde

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14909826

I had heard good things about this book and found it in a little bookshop, Pulp Fiction, when I was in Brisbane a couple of weeks ago.
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I impulsively signed up for my local public library's "winter olympics" reading challenge, and one of the requirements is to read a book set in Korea. I chose this ebook because it is short - the library is only allowing three weeks to read five books (that's much faster than my usual pace).
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Halfway through and its really good. Got me hooked in the first chapter. Turning into a unique mystery. Love how she writes.
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Bought this a while back and recently noticed it on a wish list. So reading to RABCK. =)
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Bone Soup and a Lapland Wizard ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14915888/ ), chosen for the Wine+Food release challenge - and for its quirkiness in general.

The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14915885/ ), on top of the TBR stack as I've offered it in the wishlist-tag game.
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(or My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry) by Fredrik Backman.

I've read A Man Called Ove by this author before and although it wasn't as spectacular as some reviews made it to be, I had enjoyed it a lot.

I think I enjoy this one more, it's farfetched but features a pretty engaging plot, reads more as a fable or fairytale than a novel : )
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I have this on my TBR shelf.
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Finished. I think you have to be on the mood for this type of book in order to enjoy it and I WAS on the appropriate mood.
I really liked it a lot.
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1. Natchez Burning by Greg Iles - set in 1960's Mississippi. A tough subject matter. I needed something lighter to read as well.

2. First Frost by Sarah Addison Allen - a family of women with magical talents. I could use a magical talent.

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I just finished Iles The Bone Tree.
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We Should All Be Feminists by by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie today. It was a good nonfiction read that was more of an essay.
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Don't Kill the Birthday Girl: Tales from an Allergic Life, by Sandra Beasley. A really good memoir of growing up with lots of allergies.

Now, I'm going to reread Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince because I feel the need for some HP in my life!
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...( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14915886 ), a collection of legends from the Ainu people of Japan - intended for the Indigenous Peoples bookbox.
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Finished reading 'A Question of Blood' by Ian Rankin...released yesterday 22/02/2018. Just started a completely different genre...'Friday Nights' by Joanna Trollope. A bit of light reading after murder/crime!
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... "Illumination Night" by Alice Hoffman, simply because it was the one that jumped out at me when I was perusing the shelf.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14928947

I should finish it tonight (or over the weekend for sure), and I haven't yet settled on what I'll read next.
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Reading...

“The Plot Against America” by Philip Roth
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14876279

Very compelling alternate history novel posing the question “what would have happened if Charles Lindbergh, a Nazi sympathizer, had been elected President in 1940?” Reading this as part of the 1001 list challenge. Also for the authors starting with R bookring.
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Ophelia is a fairy on her first wish granting assignment and she discovers granting a human's wish is anything but easy.
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It's good so far
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by Martha Hall Kelly http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14908554

a few more chapters to go before bookclub & I expect this will be a good discussion
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Started today. A crime/mystery novel set in Gaza Strip. It holds my interest up to now, although I have some objections on the characters' and plot's credibility. Still too early to judge.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14856639
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I'm 64% into this book and am enjoying it a lot. I'm learning a lot about the civil rights movement, especially the events that took place in Birmingham, AL in 1963.
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Just beginning. I wonder what happens during the barbecue....

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