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Feb. 17-20: What are we reading now?

This is a release-challenge-heavy time, and I'm loving it, as it urges me to get more books moving - though it also urges me to buy more books, so there's that {wry grin}. In progress now:

The Riesling Retribution ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14813452 ) a wine-country-themed murder mystery involving Civil War re-enactors, a struggling vineyard, and (of course) a budding romance.

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This is a release-challenge-heavy time, and I'm loving it, as it urges me to get more books moving - though it also urges me to buy more books, so there's that {wry grin}. In progress now:

The Riesling Retribution ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14813452/ ) a wine-country-themed murder mystery involving Civil War re-enactors, a struggling vineyard, and (of course) a budding romance.
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... I seem to be in a bit of a reading slump that started when I was totally unable to get into "My Brilliant Friend" by Elena Ferrante. Usually I can get into anything!

So I picked up a childhood book that I decided to reread before registering and releasing it. It's time for it to travel on. Past time, probably. :) The book is "The Adventures of Buster Bear" by Thornton Burgess. Here's hoping my reading mojo returns soon!
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The Woman in the Window by A. J. Finn
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My current read: Astro Truckers by Mikael Niemi

It's a very quirky short story collection about being a trucker in space! So fun
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One in the original language, "La Più Amata", by Teresa Ciabatti, which was a finalist for the 2017 Premio Strega.

The other is "Malacqua: Four days of Rain in the City of Naples, Waiting for the Occurrence of an Extraordinary Event ", by Nicola Pugliese.
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A Week In Winter by Maeve Binchey
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Not exactly engaging....Hmmm, moving slowly...
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Not exactly engaging....Hmmm, moving slowly...


I enjoyed that book very much ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/3174287/ ), though it was a bit up-and-down. Hope it improves for you!
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Thank you Gory, I waited till I finished the book my self before clicking your link. I agree it was a bizarre book, quite fragmental with odd narrative techniques and diverse lines of thought, but while I think your overall impression is positive, mine is... well, I'm not sure what mine is.
Still in two minds about this book. Start of the book moved too slowly, then it picked up somehow, then I found it mundane again. I think part of the problem is that I haven't read any Flaubert since a decade ago or so....
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and Women and Power by Mary Beard
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Listening to the two lectures and reading the book that accomponies the lectures

2. The Pearl of the Antilles by Andrea O'Reilly Herrera KTM 3/25/15 [357 pages] -- set in Cuba. I am almost 3/4 finished; going to send it to another BCer

3. The Bone Tree by Greg Iles 12/29/16 [880 pages] -- about 250 pages into the book.


ALL YEAR: Streams in the Desert by Mrs. Charles Cowman
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Finished Song of Ourselves and started Once Upon a Secret by Mimi Alford
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by Martha Hall Kelly http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/14908554. Set during WWII, it bounces between a NY socialite, a Polish girl in a concentration camp, and the SS doctor of the camp. The author is doing a good job of making the SS doctor more human - how and why did she wind up where she did, and could she have made different choices?
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by Martha Hall Kelly http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/14908554. Set during WWII, it bounces between a NY socialite, a Polish girl in a concentration camp, and the SS doctor of the camp. The author is doing a good job of making the SS doctor more human - how and why did she wind up where she did, and could she have made different choices?

I heard very good reviews about this book so I have it on my wishlist !
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I think I've found my reading groove again. Yay! Last night I started "Illumination Night" by Alice Hoffman. Seems to have pulled me right in.
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When I read that book I had never heard of Illumination Night on Martha's Vineyard before and I was wishing I could see it for myself. That's one of the things I love about reading even in fiction is learning about places and things that I wouldn't ordinarily have a chance to know about otherwise.
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I completely agree! I love when a good narrative also teaches me something and transports me to a place and/or time I've never visited.
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I read this light-hearted romance today, pleasantly entertaining :-)
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by Graeme Simsion, and enjoying it a lot.
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I have barely started this book but so far a fair book.
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so have today started August Folly by Angela Thirkell, a Virago Modern Classic first published in 1936, one of only two books among my To Be Reads that's been registered by another BookCrosser (and now there's only one!).

The next time I need a carrying around book, probably tomorrow, I'll start The Little Cottage on the Hill by Emma Davies because I think I can make it fit plum's February reading theme :-)

My ongoing nonfiction is The World of Samuel Pepys by Robert and Linnet Latham, extracts from the famous diary grouped together in topics - interesting and fairly easy to read but I don't read many pages at a time. so it'll be ongoing for some time yet, I think!
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The next time I need a carrying around book, probably tomorrow, I'll start The Little Cottage on the Hill by Emma Davies because I think I can make it fit plum's February reading theme :-)

Yes, it fitted the theme! I was out and about all day and have finished it already. Easy reading with some pleasant characters and a couple of dodgy ones for good measure!
I think I'll start my oldest unread download next, The Postcard by Fern Britton, but I'm not sure when.
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Having decided to read the Vera mysteries in order and downloaded the first to the Kindle, I reserved the second one, Telling Tales by Ann Cleeves, from the library. When I went to pick it up this morning, I found the third in the series for sale on their Withdrawn book sale table :-) Of course I started the one I'd gone for waiting for the bus home . . . .
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They only allow 3 weeks to finish 5 books, and that's much faster than I usually read, so I hope I can finish (and they don't even say what the prize will be).

For "book recommended by a friend", I chose *A Tale for the Time Being* by Ruth Ozeki. I love the lyrical language and setting; hate the sex and violence; nearly gave up on it.

For "a book on the bestseller list", I'm reading *Astrophysics for People in a Hurry* by Neil DeGrasse Tyson. What a wonderful book - so understandable! His writing style reminds me of my favorite author, John McPhee - and since it's actually a collection of older journal articles, it has that similarity to the way McPhee puts his books together.
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This is a memoir of an "allergic life." The author has multiple food and other allergies and gives an entertaining and educational look at that side of life. The book is about 10 years old and I think some things have changed (gotten better) in the intervening years...
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This one isn't supposed out until April 24....but I found it at The Strand!

Lily is a girl in New York City who dreams of becoming a marine biologist. She finds a dolphin in a nearby canal....but the dolphin can't back to her pod she could be in serious danger. Lily can't help but feel saving the dolphin is her destiny.
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or My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry. By Fredrik Backman.
Again in Greek. Good up to now.

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