corner corner Oct. 31-Nov. 3: what are we reading to start November?

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Oct. 31-Nov. 3: what are we reading to start November?

My latest carrying-around book is Knit Your Own Murder ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14617858 ), from a cozy mystery series set in a Minnesota craft shop.

Bedside reading includes the YA teen-heroes tale A Hero at the End of the World ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14747526 ), and the very creepy manga Dissolving Classroom ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14429555 ).

Some are holdovers from October release challenges that I just didn't get to in time; others are in the queue for upcoming challenges. (While the release challenges don't entirely drive what I'm reading, they do present me with a set of books to look through first, but I'll happily move on to other shelves/stacks/boxes if my what-to-read-now senses need stimulation!)

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My latest carrying-around book is Knit Your Own Murder ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14617858/ ), from a cozy mystery series set in a Minnesota craft shop.

Bedside reading includes the YA teen-heroes tale A Hero at the End of the World ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14747526/ ), and the very creepy manga Dissolving Classroom ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14429555 ).

Some are holdovers from October release challenges that I just didn't get to in time; others are in the queue for upcoming challenges. (While the release challenges don't entirely drive what I'm reading, they do present me with a set of books to look through first, but I'll happily move on to other shelves/stacks/boxes if my what-to-read-now senses need stimulation!)
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What Bloody Man Is That? by Simon Brett

A Charles Paris theatrical mystery. Apparently one of a series. I haven't read any of the others.
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I just finished "The Picture of Dorian Gray" (a re-read for my Victorian Gothic class), and am starting Henry James' "Turn of the Screw" (also a re-read, and also for the class).

I continue to read Dacia Maraini's memoir, "Bagheria", for my Italian lit class.

NOT for a class, but just because I saw it on my library's "New Books" shelf and thought it looked interesting, is Shion Miura's novel, "The Great Passage", about a dictionary editor about to retire who is seeking a replacement to continue the work of completing a 2,900 page "Über-dictionary" of the Japanese language.
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Nonfiction for my current SIY Challenge: An interesting and very easy to read memoir/autobiography by Jane Hawking with more than one apparent title - it's probably just called Travelling to Infinity but continues on the front cover with The True Story Behind The Theory of Everything and on the frontispiece with My Life with Stephen, both as though they were still part of the title, and a note in the Acknowledgements suggests that it's a reworking of her earlier book, Music to Move the Stars!

Paperback for at home reading: The Woman in the Picture by Katharine McMahon which will be taking me back to the 1920s in the company of a female lawyer, the first person narrator.

Carrying around on the Kindle: Under a Pole Star by Stef Penney which I'm looking forward to after loving The Tenderness of Wolves and being suitably impressed with The Invisible Ones - I suspect it'll make me feel chilly, will have to make sure I'm wearing my scarf . . . . ;-)
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Nonfiction for my current SIY Challenge: An interesting and very easy to read memoir/autobiography by Jane Hawking with more than one apparent title - it's probably just called Travelling to Infinity but continues on the front cover with The True Story Behind The Theory of Everything and on the frontispiece with My Life with Stephen, both as though they were still part of the title, and a note in the Acknowledgements suggests that it's a reworking of her earlier book, Music to Move the Stars!

Finished it.
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14711632
Will take a short break from nonfictions!
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A thriller which suspense is totally spoiled by a sentence on the front cover of the book. A real shame.
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It by Stephen King

Keeping Faith by Jodi Picoult
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A companion to the books that take place in the land of Tortall.
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The latest book, published a few months ago, by beloved Alki Zei, a living legend here in Greece. I believe she was one of the authors who spoke in Athens BC Convention in 2016 ( I wasn't a BCer back then).

Author's website:
http://www.alkizei.com/en/

I absolutely love it so far, as all of her books!
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READING
1. Uncle Tungsten by Oliver Sacks KTM NF 9/30/16 [318 pages] -- started last night and am over 1/4 done; an okay read

2. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco 1001 3/12/07 [618 pages] -- I have a paperback copy, but I am listening to an unabridged edition on my phone when I am working around or on the computer

3. Don't Get Scrooged by Richard Carlson audio KTM 5/14/14 -- this is my car book; 1/3 done; nothing great but a good reminder about not sweating the small stuff during the Christmas holidays


ALL YEAR: God's Best for My Life by Lloyd John Ogilvie and New Testament (A challenge with my grandchildren)

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My library book is her latest release. I believe its a prequel to "Practical Magic." Gonna be a fast read. Love her stuff!

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A 13 year old young Cuban girl in 1961 volunteers for Fidel Castro's national literacy campaign that taught those throughout the impoverished countryside to read.
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Will start today.
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...by way of a break from the intensive scary/Halloween-themed books I was reading over the last month. Among them:

Austen's Sense and Sensibility ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14448389/ ), always a joy - with the only drawback being that once I begin re-reading Austen it's hard to stop 'til I've hit all the books again.

And on audiobook, Trollope's He Knew He Was Right ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5572358/ ), which mixes a slew of romantic subplots with the main story about an otherwise fine young man who lets his own jealousy ruin his marriage. Despite that dark note, much of the book's quite amusing, with even the "will they or won't they?" questions about the various other couples being resolved relatively easily. And, to my delight, the audiobook reminded me of an amusing bit of fourth-wall-breaking by the author, one that I probably skimmed past while reading the text. Fairly late in the book, the scene has switched yet again to follow a different subset of characters, and the chapter opens thusly:

"It is rather hard upon readers that they should be thus hurried from the completion of hymeneals at Florence to the preparations for other hymeneals in Devonshire; but it is the nature of a complex story to be entangled with many weddings towards its close. In this little history there are, we fear, three or four more to come. We will not anticipate by alluding prematurely to Hugh Stanbury's treachery, or death, or the possibility that he after all may turn out to be the real descendant of the true Lord Peterborough and the actual inheritor of the title and estate of Monkhams, nor will we speak of Nora's certain fortitude under either of these emergencies. But the instructed reader must be aware that Camilla French ought to have a husband found for her; that Colonel Osborne should be caught in some matrimonial trap, as how otherwise should he be fitly punished? and that something should be at least attempted for Priscilla Stanbury, who from the first has been intended to be the real heroine of these pages. That Martha should marry Giles Hickbody, and Barty Burgess run away with Mrs MacHugh, is of course evident to the meanest novel-expounding capacity..."

From there he gets back to the story proper, but I admit the whole thing - especially the speculation as to the not-really-gonna-happen plot-twists - tickled me.
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I am only n page five so I haven't developed a real thought about this book yet.
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Never Go Back by Lee Childs
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Started this book yesterday, I'm around 100 pages in now and I find it a very slow read, but still enjoyable. It's fun how some books go unnoticed or nearly unnoticed when first published, then become talk of the town after decades. This book was published in Greece on the early '90s and several other books by this author followed. But they didn't catch up the public's attention much. Since 3-4 years ago, Ishiguro's works are published again here by a different company and have become an immediate hit. I was planning to read this author since ages ago, but you know how it is... So many books, so little time...
My mother has a couple of his books in her collection and I bought a few more my shelf a few months ago, so I think now it's about time to give them a try...
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It's interesting
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An OK-ish book to kill a couple of hours, but nothing impressive. Actually I finished this yesterday after I finished the Remains of the Day....

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