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What are you reading now? October 24 to October 27...

I didn't find a related thread so I though I'll open one...

Tell us anything you wish about the book!

For starters,
I read Τα Παραμύθια των Ρομά aka "The Fairy Tales of Roma people" , written by Rita Spanouli and George Lepeniotis.

The authors have attended humanitarian studies and social science studies and have spend more than 30 years trying to establish a relation with, intertwine, understand and help various Roma communities within Greece.

The book is a small collection of Roma fairy tales, authors mentioning where each one came from. A quite interesting read, given the fact that Roma do not open up easily and it's hard to learn much about their culture if you are an outsider. Some beautiful tales here.
No link for this one, it'll stay with me for the time been. Maybe at some point I'll get a second copy for BC....

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I didn't find a related thread so I though I'll open one...

Tell us anything you wish about the book!

For starters,
I read Τα Παραμύθια των Ρομά aka "The Fairy Tales of Roma people" , written by Rita Spanouli and George Lepeniotis.

The authors have attended humanitarian studies and social science studies and have spend more than 30 years trying to establish a relation with, intertwine, understand and help various Roma communities within Greece.

The book is a small collection of Roma fairy tales, authors mentioning where each one came from. A quite interesting read, given the fact that Roma do not open up easily and it's hard to learn much about their culture if you are an outsider. Some beautiful tales here.
No link for this one, it'll stay with me for the time been. Maybe at some point I'll get a second copy for BC....
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Origin by Dan Brown, the latest Robert Langdon adventure - all this chasing around has me exhausted already . . . .
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Origin by Dan Brown, the latest Robert Langdon adventure - all this chasing around has me exhausted already . . . .

Finished it. Just as expected. Highly entertaining nonsense. Some wonderfully wicked baddies. Some pretty goody goodies, including our friendly hero and his beautiful companion. Then there's the true star of the show, Winston, who grabs the attention whenever he appears . . . . Great fun!

Another library book next, The Curse of the House of Foskett by MRC Kasasian, another Victorian detective novel, sequel to The Mangle Street Murders.

I started Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman on the Kindle during a trip to the market this morning, short story format, suitable for picking up and putting down when out and about!
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Another library book next, The Curse of the House of Foskett by MRC Kasasian, another Victorian detective novel, sequel to The Mangle Street Murders.

I'm enjoying these Gower Street Detective novels - but wouldn't know how to classify them! Too gruesome, too much blood, torture and other such details to be cosy. But too much tongue-in-cheek humour to be serious crime. And absolutely no suspense or threat that would make them thrillers . . . .

My next novel will also be a mystery, To Catch a Rabbit by Helen Cadbury, the York Big City Read 2017.
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My next novel will also be a mystery, To Catch a Rabbit by Helen Cadbury, the York Big City Read 2017.

I've put this to one side, after half a dozen chapters, in favour of a library reservation that came in this morning, Fools and Mortals by Bernard Cornwell, which isn't the latest Uhtred adventure, although I'm sure that's overdue by now, but a stand-alone set in the Elizabethan theatre, narrated by William Shakespeare's younger brother Richard :-)
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My next novel will also be a mystery, To Catch a Rabbit by Helen Cadbury, the York Big City Read 2017.
I've put this to one side, after half a dozen chapters, in favour of a library reservation that came in this morning

I read the two books alternately for bit but have now abandoned this one at the end of chapter 13: human trafficking, drugs, murder, prostitution, police corruption . . . . I just didn't want to be there . . . . now reserved for someone who probably will . . . .
https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14731541
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I started Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman on the Kindle during a trip to the market this morning

And finished it this morning! An interesting retelling of some old tales. Don't think there were any I didn't already know!
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I read some of the series when it first was published, but not in order & didn't have all the books.

Now I had all but one - and the library had that one - so started with book 1 on my way to book 20! The series is by Robyn Carr and, I think anyway, similar to the Cedar Cove series by Debbie Macomber and the Fools Gold series by Susan Mallery. Interwoven stories of the small town folks with drama, fighting, forgiveness and, of course, romance.
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I should finish Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh. I didn't touch it all weekend, and was too swamped at work Monday and Tuesday to take a break.

My at home book is a hardback, Save Me, by Lisa Scottoline. I'm about two thirds through it, and it's not as good as I had anticipated. I see the author's name all the time and she seems popular, so I guess my expectations were too high. I have gotten fairly caught up in the plot though.
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I will be starting The Affair by Lee Child

I enjoy this Jack Reacher series. This one is set while he was still in the military so we will be seeing a young Jack.
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Dracula by Bram Stoker for my Halloween themed read. I'm about 25% into this novel.
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Newest carrying-around book is Death on Beacon Hill ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14765589/ ), from a series of mysteries set in the Gilded Age in Boston and featuring a governess with a checkered past and a knack for solving crime.

The Endless Fall and Other Weird Fictions ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14496484/ ) is on top of the bed-side stack.
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Newest carrying-around book is Death on Beacon Hill ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14765589/ ), from a series of mysteries set in the Gilded Age in Boston and featuring a governess with a checkered past and a knack for solving crime.

Oooh... like the sound of this series!
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... the end of "Prodigal Summer" by Barbara Kingsolver ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11263090/ ), although I am in no hurry to be done with it. It's my first Kingsolver and I'm definitely enjoying it. She interweaves three stories all set in the same region of Appalachia. I really like her writing style, so will be seeking out more of her work at some point.
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I love Barbara Kingsolver. Definitely give The Poisonwood Bible a try!
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Finished Retrograde by Peter Cawdon
For the most part, I like the story. My main hang up with it was there was a lot of repetitiveness in it. That was rough. And then there is the fact the publishers are trying to push the idea that it's comparable in quality/greatness to The Martian and 2001: A Space Odyssey. It's a good story, but it's not ready for those comparisons. (It's an ARC so has the potential to be rewritten some and be better, but wow, that's a lot to live up to!!!)

Still reading Fooling Houdini by Alex Stone
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14640071
I had a misconceived idea of the story going in and I have to now take a moment to reorient my thinking before continuing.
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I am reading Dialogues of the Dead by Reginald Hill, from the Dalziel and Pascoe series of crime novels. Won almost one year ago (shame on me) at the Mystery & Tea sweeps.
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The Store, by James Patterson
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...in Greek : )

"Marko Polo- An original study about his travels" written by Kosmas Politis

The book is an easier read than what it sounds and I find it very interesting.

But what's equally interesting is also the whole story of how it finally got published decades after it was written....

The author has given the manuscript to be published in a series of articles on a well-known Ταχυδρόμος magazine a few weeks before the 21rst April 1967 military junta. Exactly on 21 April 1967, Kosmas Politis' wife Clara died. Also, as he was a well-known communist, junta arrested and interrogated him for some time. Of course his works were banned. The magazine decided to publish his work without any reference to the author name.

The manuscript was kept from journalist/author/editor Yiannis Korides in his office along with manuscripts of other important poets and authors collaborating with the magazine.
One day, Korides arrived in his office in time to see a cleaning lady throwing away tons of manuscripts found in his office, as she thought it's just junk. He was able to go through 3 huge bags of papers and retrieve their manuscripts along with other important works from other authors.
Politis was confiscated in his own home by juda at the time but young Korides decided to try visiting him in order to give him his manuscripts back. The guards didn't want to allow access to the house, but one of them had read some of Politis' books and allowed Korides to meet the author for 5 minutes.

There Kosmas Politis trusted Kosmides the manuscripts in a very moving scene, saying they were safer with him and he believed that maybe sometime in the future they will be published under his name. That was the last time the two men met.

Kosmas Politis died in poor health on 23 February 1974, exactly 5 months before Junta collapsed.

After many adventures, this book was finally published on 2001.

I am (not) impressed that I can't find any decent reference in English about Kosmas Politis. Maybe this will do:

http://www.chronosmag.eu/---/s-tsouprou-kosmas-politis-known-and-unknown-information-on-his-work.html
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Very interesting. Thanks for sharing the story of how it came to be published.
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Aside all other tragic effects this dictatorship had, one has to keep wondering how many important pieces of literature and art were lost for ever, either along with their creators either even if the authors/artists survived. A very sad period of contemporary Greek history...
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That's an intriguing story, and I thank you for sharing.

It looks as though only one of Politis' books, "Eroica", has been translated into English. Do you know that one? Would you recommend I look for it?
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I know people who loved Eroica and other people who didn't like it at all.

Personally I think maybe by nowadays standards it might feel somehow trite, but it was quite original back then and Politis has a beautiful writing style.

Also he creates some undertone like he is mocking his heroes and novel himself, making a statement all this well-being and morals and lightness is material for day-dreamers and novels rather than real life. Hard to explain and not sure how it feels in translation.

I remember reading it in my teens and loving it, then reading it in early 20s and wasn't impressed and reading it again sometime around my 30 and appreciating it again. Maybe it's time for a re-read lol
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The classic story of the red haired orphan on Prince Edward Island.
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One of my favorite books! :)
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A new author for me but so far a good book.
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Only two chapters in, but I loved the first two books in this trilogy, so I have high hopes for this one.
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Enjoying this one very much!
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Enjoying this one very much!

I recommend you also try Val McDermid's modern day retelling, same name, all very gothic, great fun!
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Enjoying this one very much!


While that one's not my favorite Austen novel, I did find it very entertaining - and quite hilarious! My comments here ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/4223095 ).
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... "The Nobodies Album" by Carolyn Parkhurst (not yet registered). It's the only one of her novels that I haven't read yet and at about the 50 page mark I am enjoying it very much.
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...is Who Am I Today ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14522567 ), an entertaining collection of essays - some on real-life foibles such as the perils of aging (as in "why can't I do that simple thing anymore" - all too familiar to me) and others wildly silly and surreal.

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