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October audiobook thread

I am still listening to *A Gentleman in Moscow* by Amor Towles and enjoying it. Terrific narrator (sorry, can't remember his name at the moment). Only 2 ore discs to go.

Who is in your ears this month?

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I am still listening to *A Gentleman in Moscow* by Amor Towles and enjoying it. Terrific narrator (sorry, can't remember his name at the moment). Only 2 ore discs to go.

Who is in your ears this month?
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I'm enjoying a re-listen of Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14066423/ ), read by Simon Vance.
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Stephen Fry reading the Complete Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. A delight!
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by Amor Towles. It was a good story, very well told. And the narrator was excellent.

About to start Lisette's List, by Susan Vreeland, a favourite author of mine. I have read several of her novels (listened to a few of them, in fact) and just finished a volume of her short stories. They were really good and I don't usually go for short stories.
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Next up: The Horror on the Links ( https://www.audible.com/---/B06XWG7MDG ), by Seabury Quinn, the first volume of a set that collects all of Quinn's "Jules de Grandin" stories. Grandin is a kind of Sherlock-Holmes-style detective whose cases often shade into the supernatural. I've read some in the past, in the pulp magazines where they originally appeared or in other anthologies, but this recent collection includes them all. The narrator's doing a good job so far, and while I may want to switch this up instead of listening to all the stories at once, I'm enjoying it.
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...( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5572358/ ), an often-infuriating tale of an apparently perfect marriage that disintegrated with amazing suddenness due to the husband's sudden jealousy - though it's a bit more complicated than that, with communication styles and changing social mores and lots of other things in the mix. The whole story makes me want to grab each main character, shake them a bit, and refer them to the "Captain Awkward" advice-blog {wry grin}.

[I enjoyed the first part of Horror on the Links, but switched to the Trollope in between segments of the download, as the stories are a bit same-y regarding their pulp style. Will get back to the anthology when I've finished the Trollope novel.]
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I see I haven't posted in this thread yet. I finished The Fall of Giants by Ken Follett near the beginning of the month (liked it quite a bit) and since then I've been working on Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi which is read by Dominic Hoffman. The narrator is doing a fabulous job with all the different accents and I am enjoying the story which starts during the days of the slave trade in the area that became Ghana and follows people on both sides of the Atlantic through eight generations.
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I will have to look for it. I have the hard copy and was planning on beginning it soon.

I have one disc left in *Lisette's List*. The narrator has a lovely French accent and that has made it really nice but there is one character/relationship that is infuriating me and this has been a bit of a disappointment for me in this book. I usually love Vreeland's books but this one has been a bit of a let-down.

I am on hold for another audiobook which I hope will arrive soon: *Giants of the Senate* by Al Franken. I have heard good things about it
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My husband enjoyed this book years ago when he read it for school. I enjoyed it too. https://captivatedreader.blogspot.com/---/the-scarlet-pimpernel-by-baroness.html
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In both cases, I have a hard copy as well and did some back-and-forth.

More specifically, As You Wish (Elwes) - photos in the paper copy and Brown Girl Dreaming (Woodson) - additional poems and some spelling questions answered by the hard copy.

These were both cases where I definitely enjoyed listening to the author reading her/his own work: the fact that many of the asides in the Elwes book were read by the other actors from the Princess Bride was an added bonus.

For poetry, you get more of the nuances when they're spoken..but you lose the visual impact of the way the text is arranged on the page.
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I recently purchased a hard copy of the Elwes book but would love to listen to it, if I can find the audio in the library.

I also just finished the Woodson book. Wasn't it beautiful!
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I recently purchased a hard copy of the Elwes book but would love to listen to it, if I can find the audio in the library.

I recommend it if you can get it - my library has a wait list for both the e-book and the downloadable audio version.

I also just finished the Woodson book. Wasn't it beautiful!

It was very evocative of her childhood...and in some small ways reminiscent of mine: I loved watching Big Blue Marble!
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Listening to Harry Farthing read his "Summit".

So far, pretty grim.
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I'm stuck in a couple of audiobooks, tried one and then the other and I just don't care about either one/they are too depressing.

So thanks for the suggestions!
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Great narration, but the story itself was just okay.

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