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Challenge yourself to read from the 1001 list (2017)

Welcome to the 9th edition of this annual challenge! Our aim is to read books from the list of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die.

The format of the challenge has not changed a lot from when katrinat conceived it years ago: readers report back on books they have read, or post links to the books' journals. Over the years this has developed into a cozy reading space where participants who are looking for the same kind of inspiration from the books they read can check in now and then to give feedback, read about how others experienced the books they have read, and draw inspiration from fellow participants in a non-competitive, supportive environment.

Are you looking to expand the breadth and depth of your reading? Would you like to get acquainted with some of the best classics and modern literature available out there? The 1001 list has a rich mix of books from across the centuries, genres and points of view. It is a way to discover new books and authors, and also a reminder of all those books one has always meant to read. There have been a few editions of the list, and any book that has appeared on one of the lists, qualifies.

So, challenge yourself and set your own target of the number of books from the combined 1001 list that you would like to read during 2017. Use this thread to join in, state your target, report back on the books you have read and what you thought of them (without spoilers, please; others may also want to read the book).

Apart from the annual challenge, we also keep an updated life list. Your life list total should reflect the total number of books from the combined list of the various editions of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die that you have read. The combined list adds up to 1305 titles. Few of us have a realistic expectation to read all the books on the list, but it is interesting to keep track of how one makes progress each year.

For a full list of the books, refer to this forum entry from last year's challenge:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8844101

Finally, if you are looking for copies of books, why not become a member of the 1001-library? Through the library, 1001-list books can be passed between members. All instructions are in the extended profile of the library's bookshelf.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/1001-library

----
Life list totals as at 2016-12-31:
(updated 2017-10-21)

As readers join this year's challenge or report in the forum what their life list total is, I'll add the reported total here or transfer it from the life list as at the end of last year's challenge.

368 -- blackwidow1971
246 -- gypsysmom
201 -- booklady331
178 -- lamelemon
167 -- bookguide
164 -- ruzena
148 -- flewry
139 -- Boekentrol
136 -- Stoepbrak
96 -- saskiasosmile
91 -- Megi53
37 -- elizardbreath
36 -- lils74
27 -- Spatial
8 -- CathrineB
0 -- Readermax

----
Progress against personal challenge targets for 2017:
(updated 2017-11-20)

16/21 -- blackwidow1971
19/12 -- Boekentrol
00/12 -- bookguide
10/10 -- booklady331
00/12 -- BookLovinMama
00/12 -- Bookworminusall
01/04 -- CathrineB
03/06 -- elizardbreath
05/10 -- flewry
12/10 -- gypsysmom
06/25 -- lamelemon
00/05 -- lils74
00/06 -- Megi53
01/05 -- Readermax
11/05 -- ruzena
02/10 -- saskiasosmile
05/05 -- Spatial
18/18 -- Stoepbrak

Complete Thread

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Welcome to the 9th edition of this annual challenge! Our aim is to read books from the list of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die.

The format of the challenge has not changed a lot from when katrinat conceived it years ago: readers report back on books they have read, or post links to the books' journals. Over the years this has developed into a cozy reading space where participants who are looking for the same kind of inspiration from the books they read can check in now and then to give feedback, read about how others experienced the books they have read, and draw inspiration from fellow participants in a non-competitive, supportive environment.

Are you looking to expand the breadth and depth of your reading? Would you like to get acquainted with some of the best classics and modern literature available out there? The 1001 list has a rich mix of books from across the centuries, genres and points of view. It is a way to discover new books and authors, and also a reminder of all those books one has always meant to read. There have been a few editions of the list, and any book that has appeared on one of the lists, qualifies.

So, challenge yourself and set your own target of the number of books from the combined 1001 list that you would like to read during 2017. Use this thread to join in, state your target, report back on the books you have read and what you thought of them (without spoilers, please; others may also want to read the book).

Apart from the annual challenge, we also keep an updated life list. Your life list total should reflect the total number of books from the combined list of the various editions of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die that you have read. The combined list adds up to 1305 titles. Few of us have a realistic expectation to read all the books on the list, but it is interesting to keep track of how one makes progress each year.

For a full list of the books, refer to this forum entry from last year's challenge:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8844101

Finally, if you are looking for copies of books, why not become a member of the 1001-library? Through the library, 1001-list books can be passed between members. All instructions are in the extended profile of the library's bookshelf.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/1001-library

----
Life list totals as at 2016-12-31:
(updated 2017-10-21)

As readers join this year's challenge or report in the forum what their life list total is, I'll add the reported total here or transfer it from the life list as at the end of last year's challenge.

368 -- blackwidow1971
246 -- gypsysmom
201 -- booklady331
178 -- lamelemon
167 -- bookguide
164 -- ruzena
148 -- flewry
139 -- Boekentrol
136 -- Stoepbrak
96 -- saskiasosmile
91 -- Megi53
37 -- elizardbreath
36 -- lils74
27 -- Spatial
8 -- CathrineB
0 -- Readermax

----
Progress against personal challenge targets for 2017:
(updated 2017-11-20)

16/21 -- blackwidow1971
19/12 -- Boekentrol
00/12 -- bookguide
10/10 -- booklady331
00/12 -- BookLovinMama
00/12 -- Bookworminusall
01/04 -- CathrineB
03/06 -- elizardbreath
05/10 -- flewry
12/10 -- gypsysmom
06/25 -- lamelemon
00/05 -- lils74
00/06 -- Megi53
01/05 -- Readermax
11/05 -- ruzena
02/10 -- saskiasosmile
05/05 -- Spatial
18/18 -- Stoepbrak
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Lifetime total at the end of 2016: 167 (12.8 % of the whole list)

Goal for 2017: 12

This year I only finished 6, so I'm being a bit optimistic, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.
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Thanks for hosting, Stoepbrak! : )

I have been contemplating this for quite some time, so I'll attempt this Challenge this year in BigJohnLefty's Memory (may he Rest in Peace) with a goal of 12 books.

Found this all inclusive list of Titles by Century in text, if anyone's interested.

https://1001bookreviews.com/the-1001-book-list

And this one from Goodreads, with Cover Pics. ; )

https://www.goodreads.com/---/1001-books-to-read-before-you-die

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Life list totals: 178/1305
Aiming to read 25 1001-list books in 2017.

I have at least 41 books at hand to choose from and I will try to wind my way steadily through them. I haven't chosen the first one yet, as I'm still not home to drown in my bookshelf, but my guess is I'll pick one of the most recent ones available, for a fresh start.

Thanks Stoepbrak for the booking and best of luck to everyone taking part! And happy reading, of course :)
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Welcome to all of you who have taken up the challenge, as well as those likely to join in soon!

There will be less time for reading this year, so I'll settle for a target of 18 for 2017.

@Bookworminusall:
• I'm so sorry to hear about BigJohnLefty! He still signed up for the challenge last year. I can't think of a better way to honour his memory than to join the challenge, so a special welcome to you.
• I've added your personal target for the year. Once you've had a chance to look at the combined list, let us know how many of them you've read so far, for inclusion in the life list.

@booklady331 and @Boekentrol:
• You mentioned your 2017 target in the thread for last year's challenge already, so I took the liberty to transfer those, as well as your life list totals, to this year's challenge.

@Bulan-Purnama:
• In the thread for last year's challenge you listed 4 books that you wanted to read this year. Should I add a target of 4 for you in this year's challenge?
• Once you've had a chance to look at the combined list, let us know how many of them you've read so far, for inclusion in the life list.
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1. Midnight's Children – Salman Rushdie

"I had been mysteriously handcuffed to history, my destinies indissolubly chained to those of my country. For the next three decades, there was to be no escape. Soothsayers had prophesised me, newspapers celebrated my arrival, politicos ratified my authenticity. I was left entirely without a say in the matter."

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13699260
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2. Moll Flanders – Daniel Defoe

"On the other hand, every branch of my story, if duly considered, may be useful to honest people, and afford a due caution to people of some sort or other to guard against the like surprises, and to have their eyes about them when they have to do with strangers of any kind, for 'tis very seldom that some snare or other is not in their way. The moral, indeed, of all my history is left to be gathered by the senses and judgment of the reader; I am not qualified to preach to them. Let the experience of one creature completely wicked, and completely miserable, be a storehouse of useful warning to those that read. "

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13843470
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3. The Buddha of Suburbia – Hanif Kureishi

"Watching Jamila sometimes made me think the world was divided into three sorts of people: those who knew what they wanted to do; those (the unhappiest) who never knew what their purpose in life was; and those who found out later on. I was in the last category, I reckoned, which didn't stop me wishing I'd been born into the first."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13975762
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4. The Honorary Consul – Graham Greene

"I have never met a simple man. Not even in the confessional, though I used to sit there for hours on end. Man was not created simple. When I was a young priest, I used to try to unravel what motives a man or woman had, what temptations and self-delusions. But I soon learned to give all that up, because there was never a straight answer. No one was simple enough for me to understand. In the end I would just say, 'Three Our Fathers, Three Hail Marys. Go in peace.'"

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14046043
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Finally catching up with some outstanding JEs. :)

5. Cat's Eye – Margaret Atwood

"Most mothers worry when their daughters reach adolescence but I was the opposite. I relaxed, I sighed with relief. Little girls are cute and small only to adults. To one another they are not cute. They are life-sized."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13918030

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6. Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden

"Grief is a most peculiar thing; we're so helpless in the face of it. It's like a window that will simply open of its own accord. The room grows cold, and we can do nothing but shiver. But it opens a little less each time, and a little less; and one day we wonder what has become of it."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14117880
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7. Siddhartha – Herman Hesse

"Writing is good, thinking is better. Cleverness is good, patience is better."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13975765
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8. Billy Bathgate – EL Doctorow

"Mr Schultz did impulsive and unwise things, and I worried that I was one of them."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14138534
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9. Justine – Lawrence Durrell

"She gazed about her like a half-trained panther."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14278631
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10. Unless – Carol Shields

"This is why I read novels: so I can escape my own unrelenting monologue."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13975755
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11. The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro

"I do not think I responded immediately, for it took me a moment or two to fully digest these words of Miss Kenton. Moreover, as you might appreciate, their implications were such as to provoke a certain degree of sorrow within me. Indeed – why should I not admit it? – at that moment, my heart was breaking."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13975757
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12. Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde – Robert Louis Stevenson

"With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to the truth by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck: that man is not truly one, but truly two."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13975753
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13. The Wind-up Bird Chronicle – Haruki Murakami

"I'm not so weird to me."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13699296
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14. The Line of Beauty – Alan Hollinghurst

"It's just like life, though, isn't it - maybe too like life for a ... conventional movie. It's about someone who loves things more than people. And who ends up with nothing, of course. I know it's bleak, but then I think it's probably a very bleak book, even though it's essentially a comedy."

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13975783
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15-17. The Forsyte Saga – John Galsworthy

----
'A Forsyte,' replied young Jolyon, 'is not an uncommon animal. There are hundreds among the members of this Club. Hundreds out there in the streets; you meet them wherever you go!'
'And how do you tell them, may I ask?' said Bosinney.
'By their sense of property. A Forsyte takes a practical — one might say a common-sense — view of things, and a practical view of things is based fundamentally on a sense of property. A Forsyte, you will notice, never gives himself away.'
'Joking?'
Young Jolyon's eye twinkled.
'Not much. As a Forsyte myself, I have no business to talk. But I'm a kind of thoroughbred mongrel; now, there's no mistaking you. You're as different from me as I am from my Uncle James, who is the perfect specimen of a Forsyte. His sense of property is extreme, while you have practically none. Without me in between, you would seem like a different species. I'm the missing link. We are, of course, all of us the slaves of property, and I admit that it's a question of degree, but what I call a "Forsyte" is a man who is decidedly more than less a slave of property — it doesn't matter whether it be wives, houses, money, or reputation — is his hall-mark.'
'Ah!' murmured Bosinney. 'You should patent the word.'
----

The Forsyte Saga comprises three books: (i) Man of Property, (ii) In Chancery, and (iii) To Let — plus two interludes: Indian Summer of a Forsyte, and Awakening. All three books, which include the two interludes, are from my own library. The Forsyte Saga earned John Galsworthy the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1932. The saga is but the first of three sets of three books each, plus four interludes and a collection of short stories, making up the Forsyte Chronicles (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Forsyte_Saga).

The books turned out to be an enjoyable read. Well written, witty and with a lot of insight in the human condition.

As I've done with the series A Dance to the Music of Time by Anthony Powell, I'll credit my 1001 BYMRBYD life list by just one for the series but count the books individually for this year's list.
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18. Brighton Rock – Graham Greene

"He was like a child with haemophilia: every contact drew blood."

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13975767
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I will again try for 10 books from the combined lists. I have read 245 so far.
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Count me in - aiming for 21 this year.

And just to be really annoying:

#1 The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett. An enjoyable hard boiled detective novel set in 1930s New York featuring a detective who spends far more time drinking than detecting, yet still solves the crime. Nice to have a happily married hero rather than a dysfunctional loner. Bought with a Christmas voucher and raced through :-)
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#1 The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett. An enjoyable hard boiled detective novel set in 1930s New York featuring a detective who spends far more time drinking than detecting, yet still solves the crime. Nice to have a happily married hero rather than a dysfunctional loner. Bought with a Christmas voucher and raced through :-)


This is one I read last year, and enjoyed, without even realizing till later that it was on the 1001 list. I know what you mean about happily married hero - - I liked that he was contrary to many current stereotypes. It was a lot of fun to read!
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Also, I said in the last thread that I had read at least 35 from the list, but realized that it's 36. At least. If I get more accurate than that, I'll let you know :)
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I would like to join again even though I did not reach my target last year.
So far I have read 96 1001-books.
I will say, well around 10 or 12 at the most, this year. There is at the moment a lot less time to read, unfortunately. But it is a challenge for me...
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I thought I had signed up last year, but never saw my name in the thread lists. I'll try again

My life list is 91 books read.

I have five of them in my current TBR pile, and six will be my challenge number. I intend to read as much as possible from TBR this year, but to make it fun, I'll let myself buy or borrow one additional book from the 1001 lists.

Planned: *The Plague* by Camus; *The Shipping News* by Annie Proulx; *Walden* by Thoreau; *Don Quijote* (in Spanish) by Cervantes; *The Name of the Rose* by Umberto Eco.
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me too, please!

Hello there! I keep mulling this over and I'd love to join this year if it's not too late. My goal for the year is 10 and my life list total currently stands at 148.
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Arthur, koning voor eens en altijd by Terence H. White. Link: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6188589

I liked the read, although the interruptions like 'if you want to read more about...., turn to....' get annotung when theg keep appearing throughout the book.

For those who haven't read it yet: recommendable :-)
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The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells 2/9/13 registered by me
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11696838
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Well, why not?

Aiming for ten and promising five. Editing my all inclusive list here.

1. Vladimir Nabokov: Kalvas hehku (Pale Fire)
2. John Dos Passos: Manhattan Transfer
3. Thomas Pynchon: Huuto 49 (The Crying of Lot 49)
4. Margaret Atwood: The Robber Bride
5. Marguerite Duras: Rakastaja (L'amant / The Lover)
6. Marguerite Duras: Varakonsuli (Le Vice-consul / The Vice-consul)



My life list 2016-12-31 was 164 books, as far as I recognized all titles (I read mostly in Finnish and in Swedish). Need a long life...
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The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12365136/

A book that I found very strange. I kept losing track and wondering what in heaven's name I am reading. It took me 3 months or so ( for a book this thin), but I must admit that I often read a book before it, because it just didn't touch me.

So... On with the next one: Down Second Avenue by Ezekiel Mphahlele.
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I felt the same way about that book.
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The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12365136/

A book that I found very strange


I thought this was just downright awful. I only finished it because I was on a train and had nothing else to read!
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The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12365136/

A book that I found very strange


I thought this was just downright awful. I only finished it because I was on a train and had nothing else to read!


I'm glad to learn that I'm not the only one! flewry also agrees with us...
Sometimes it is very hard to find out whether I dislike or don't understand a book because I'm not a native English speaker (missing too much humor, puns, clues, hints at things every born and bread would recognize) or because I just dislike the book (writing, subject) like there are (books by) Dutch authors I avoid ever since I had to read them for Dutch literature classes...

I know my English is okay, but when it comes to reading from the 1001-list in English, I really sometimes start to doubt it.
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I know my English is okay, but when it comes to reading from the 1001-list in English, I really sometimes start to doubt it.


Same with me. When I read The Hobbit and The Lord of The Rings in English, I sometimes had to read a sentence twice or trice to understand it.
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A quick read about two mixed race childhood friends, one of whom marries an African-American and moves to Harlem while the other "passes" as white.

I enjoyed this more than the same author's "Quicksand", which is very depressing. I liked the character of Irene.

Read on Kindle.
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was American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis, up for grabs if anybody dares
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13185589
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The Thirty-nine Steps by John Buchan doesn't increase my life total because I had read it before but I thought I was due for a reread and a fellow BookCrosser had a copy up for grabs:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14204220/

It is still a pretty good read even though it is set more than 100 years ago. Of course, women are non-existent and the British class system is at its height but, if you can get over those hurdles, you will probably enjoy it.
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My first goal is to go through the list to see which books I've read to come up with an initial count.

My goal for the year is to read 12 books from the list.
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I have read Ezekiel Mpgahlele - Down Second Avenue: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11958742

A quiet and interesting book. Interesting to read because of the contents. The writing I found a bit boring (but maybe I'm not completely catching everything here)..
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6752444

Good start to this year's 1001 reading! I enjoyed this thoroughly, and it was quick. This is going back on the 1001-Library shelf and I am happy to send to other members. (Check my profile for others, too, since it's not any more expensive to send several books together.)
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A man living in a boarding house spies on the room next door and sees stories of human tragedy.

I thought "Under Fire" was a masterpiece but didn't think much of this at all. Depressing with an unsympathetic voyeur of a hero.

Read on Kindle - free download.
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Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13845755

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I'm in

I think I'll set my goal to 4 books.

I've read 8 books previously. Not a very high number. And two of them were books we had to read at school; Hunger and Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde.
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1/4

I've read "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck. http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12666095
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that arukiyomi is hosting a kickstarter for creating 1001 books/movies Android apps.
https://www.kickstarter.com/---/1001-apps-for-android

I've been using the secured desktop spreadsheet intermittently since 2011, but preferred a clean and simple google doc for my actual progress. I am aware there's an iPhone app out there too (Goodreads thread for it: https://www.goodreads.com/---/789883-1001-books-app ), but since I am an Android fangirl I never got to actually try it.

I've pledged £15, which would allow me to claim both apps if the project comes true. And hey, the good news is the funding is All of nothing - so my money goes only if the whole amount is crowdfunded.
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14376357/

There is a long poem "Pale Fire" written by the late John Shade, and the rest of the book seems like Professor of Literature Charles Kinbote analyzing and commenting on the poem.
Having read just a few pages of commentaries, the reader finds out Nabokov's plot: this is not at least a study on literature, but it turns out that Kinbote is the king to be a character, and leaves the poet Shade in the shade (sic).
This book was really worth reading, and I think I'll read it again after a while to find those ideas and tricks that I might still have missed.
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7216285

Even if no bigger-than-life book for me, this was an entertaining read, and added to my literary education and 1001-books count.
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Funny little book about a shipping clerk who decides to become a cheese importer to impress his superior friends. He's only held back by the fact he doesn't like cheese and has absolutely no clue how to import it. And he doesn't have a typewriter or suitable office desk.

This reminded me more than anything else of "Diary of a Nobody". Apparently the author meant it as a tragicomedy, not just a comedy and it sort of is, but it's also sometimes just funny. The hero is an idiot.

This is the first book I've read by a Belgian author who isn't either Herge or Simenon!
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I listened to Carry Me Down by M. J. Hyland. I thought I would enjoy this book set in Ireland about a boy who is twelve chronologically, about seventeen physically but maybe only eight mentally. However it just did not appeal to me. Here's my review:
http://www.librarything.com/---/138124362
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I discovered in reviewing some notes I made about books I read years ago that I had read In the Forest by Edna O'Brien so my life total should have been 246 before this last read and now I have read 247.
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I discovered in reviewing some notes I made about books I read years ago that I had read In the Forest by Edna O'Brien so my life total should have been 246 before this last read and now I have read 247.

If you have read 2 this year and your current total is 247, your total as at the end of last year seems to be correct at 245, which is what it was. Please check and let me know.
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I discovered in reviewing some notes I made about books I read years ago that I had read In the Forest by Edna O'Brien so my life total should have been 246 before this last read and now I have read 247.

If you have read 2 this year and your current total is 247, your total as at the end of last year seems to be correct at 245, which is what it was. Please check and let me know.

The first one I read this year, The Thirty-nine Steps, was a reread so it didn't increase my life total.
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The first one I read this year, The Thirty-nine Steps, was a reread so it didn't increase my life total.

Aha! I should be more awake and pick up on those. :)

OK, so then I'll increase your life total as at the end of last year to 246. Of course, at the end of the year I will leave it to all of you to tell me what your updated totals are.
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11291837

I found that I enjoyed this book more than I thought it would. I think I will seek out the other Ripley books. Not sure if I'll watch the movie or not. I think the movie might spoil the book.
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1. The brief wondrous life of Oscar Wao, by Junot Diaz.
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Finally a book that had been sitting on my shelf for years and that everybody and their cat has already read :) (up for grabs, just in case your feline was less inclined to try it)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5578208
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Non-BC book. A dreamy story that manages to be sweet, funny, and wise, all at once. A quick read, too.

This brings my life list total to an even 150! (I think my last book wasn't counted there.)
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This brings my life list total to an even 150!
Well done!

(I think my last book wasn't counted there.)
Correct. If you look at the heading you'll see the life list is as it was at the end of last year. At the end of this year, I'll update it. Theoretically, one can add the year's progress to last year's life list to get an idea of a reader's current life list. That's not necessarily accurate, though. For instance, if one rereads a book, it would count as a read for this year but won't affect one's life list.
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This is interesting to read now with modern eyes. I've always heard this described as a Lesbian novel. Now, I'm no expert (being a straight woman who once kissed a girl for a bet when we were both drunk, which I don't think counts), but I would describe the hero/ine of this novel as transgender. Other characters in the book are Lesbian (Barbara & Jamie, Valerie) or bisexual (Angela, Mary), but I'd say Stephen is transgender. I'd be interested to know what other readers think.

I don't think it's the best novel in the 1001 BTRBYD and is perhaps there more for being ground-breaking than anything else (I seem to remember hearing Virginia Woolf was called to defend the novel at its obscenity trial, but she personally thought it was rubbish and not well written). I'm glad I read it though - although some of the love story bits are rather Mills & Boon at times (and don't get me started on her conversations with horses who talk back), her evident love of the countryside around Malvern shines through and is lovingly described. Makes me want to visit!

It also counts for my Read Harder 2017 challenge as a banned book.
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Didn't enjoy too much.
I know that it is a modern classic in American literature and a pacemaker in experimental and postmodern writing. So I read it as a lesson and a challenge (thank you Stoepbrak :). I found it all joking: about relationship (a woman & her ex's who die or disappear or turn impossible), about psychoanalysis, crazy therapists, ex-Nazis, conspiracy theories, rich people, anarchists... Oedipa is the only one that is not a joke but a heroine - but why Oedipa?, something to do with Oedipus?

https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13931158
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If you think YOUR friends were unreliable and YOUR intimate relations catastrophic, just read this!

After my previous 1001-books that were more (The Crying for Lot 49 from 1965) or less (Pale Fire, 1962, Manhattan Transfer, 1925) "modern classics", relax! This novel from 1993 is conventionally structured, no need for excessive thinking, you can just read on.
Interesting, smart, funny, and even thrilling though.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7548988/
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Forgot about this one - finished it before The Well of Loneliness.

It's the story of Marya, an actress who is living in Paris with her Polish husband, an "antique dealer" (ie a fence). When he goes to prison, she is left to fend for herself and ends up being drawn into an affair with a married man. Apparently based on Rhys' own affair with Ford Maddox Ford in the same circumstances (although he wasn't actually married, but living with Stella Bowen).

Jean Rhys is starting to remind me of Malcolm Lowry. Lowry went to Mexico twice, got horribly drunk both times, then wrote novels based on each visit. Having recently read Good Morning Midnight as well, I think Jean Rhys went to Paris twice, drank heavily, slept with an unsuitable man and then wrote a novel about it. At least she went on to write Wide Sargasso Sea.
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Jean Rhys is starting to remind me of Malcolm Lowry. Lowry went to Mexico twice, got horribly drunk both times, then wrote novels based on each visit. Having recently read Good Morning Midnight as well, I think Jean Rhys went to Paris twice, drank heavily, slept with an unsuitable man and then wrote a novel about it. At least she went on to write Wide Sargasso Sea.


Though I'm not familiar with Malcom Lowry, I think what you say about Jean Rhys makes total sense! But I actually loved Good Morning Midnight, though I can certainly see why someone wouldn't, so now I'm pleased to know I'll probably enjoy Quartet as well.
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ok

nice challenge
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Romeo & Juliet
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11129259

Read it with my 9th grade English class. They ended up loving the story.
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Taking some ideas from Shakespeare, this is about lots of twins in a theatrical family. Some aspects are a fun romp, but there's a darker side too, including about exploitation of children, and a bit of magic realism.

Surprisingly, it being Angela Carter, I found no reference to Leda and the Swan!
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Hope you don't mind me crashing the thread, I haven't been as active on the forum recently. I am still reading books from the list. I have a number of 1001-Library books waiting for new readers. If you are interested and a member of the 1001-Library, please PM me or write a post below. If you are not a member, check out the 1001-Library page for more details on how to join.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/1001-library

1. Ethan Frome - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/2374345
2. Interview with a Vampire - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/2879593
3. Portrait of the Artist - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/4049016
4. The Trial - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5554853
5. Moll Flanders - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5669709
6. Memoirs of a Geisha - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5687744
7. The Mill on the Floss - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5980519
8. The Grapes of Wrath - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6006143
9. Hard Times - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6028185
10. Breakfast of Champions - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6998464
11. The Moonstone - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7193421
12. The Girls of Slender Means - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7446194
13. The Female Quixote - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7586622
14. Of Mice and Men - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7578471
15. Fathers and Sons - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7704783
16. The Spy who came in from the cold - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8110123
17. Around the world in 80 days - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8116743
18. A Woman's Life - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8343605
19. Oroonoko - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8389490
20. Crash - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8481415
21. The Vicar of Wakefield - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9745860
22. Silk - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9766917
23. Uncle Tom's Cabin - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9795116
24. The Rainbow - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9823863
25. Aesop's Fables - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9848302
26. Girl with Green Eyes (I have the trilogy) - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9939757
27. Nausea - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9961069
28. A Hero for our Time - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10173119
29. Flowers for Mrs. Harris - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10259526
30. The Book about Blanche and Marie - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11084982
31. Lucky Jim - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11259267
32. The Kreutzer Sonata http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11327688
33. The Tale of Genji - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11329400
34. Almost Transparent Blue - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11893222
35. Eugene Onegin http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11958716
36. Down Second Avenue - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11958742
37. Bel-ami - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11958957
38. She - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12068183
39. Baltasar and Blimunda http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12068191
40. A visit from the goon squad http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12079368
41-43. The Forsyte Saga (three books)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12256670
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12093623
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12084932
44. Slow Man - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5673501
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The Island of Doctor Moreau was the only H. G. Wells book on the list that I had not read and I wasn't really looking forward to reading it since I knew it was about vivisection. However, I wanted to download some books onto my mp3 player for listening to while we were travelling and this one was available from my library's electronice media site. I only gave it a 5 out of 10 because I found the subject matter disturbing (I know that was probably Wells intent but it didn't improve my experience).
http://www.librarything.com/---/138603350
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I was in the minority for the copy I read, but I loved this.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7924968
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A book I liked. Started of as a strange story, but quite early I also got the feeling that this couldn't end well. How it ends? You have to read that yourself. I won't write any spoilers...!
Link to the book: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7522227
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Library audiobook, no BCID. Not exactly earth-shattering for me, but I enjoyed it enough and am interested to read more from this author.
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Library audiobook, no BCID. Not exactly earth-shattering for me, but I enjoyed it enough and am interested to read more from this author.

Read The Stone Diaries. It was, for me, a far richer book than Unless although I also enjoyed Unless.
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Library audiobook, no BCID. Not exactly earth-shattering for me, but I enjoyed it enough and am interested to read more from this author.

Read The Stone Diaries. It was, for me, a far richer book than Unless although I also enjoyed Unless.


I keep foisting "Unless" onto people and no-one loves it as much as I do! I really didn't like "Mary Swann", which is very different from her other novels, so you might prefer it!

I'm falling behind with all my challenges at the moment. I'll finish one off Mt TBR then try to pick up again.
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12102369
I've previously read a book or two by Duras, and thought: not my cup of tea. Anyhow, now when I read The Lover and The Vice-consul, I grew more acquainted with her text and learned to enjoy it.
Duras does not describe events consistently, nor does she focus on the motives of her characters. The charm of the text is in the mood and the language that conveys it. And as to feminine writing, she is superior.
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12102391
This belongs to Duras's Indian works. It describes the social game of some colonialists, the "holy synod of the white Calcutta", its counterpart being a young beggar girl. I found the story a bit difficult to follow, but the text is stylish and fascinating. I could feel the heat and humidity of the Indian climate - "it only awaits thunder."
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Enjoyed it! It wasn't my favorite John Irving but I'd still recommend it. http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13485022
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An interesting book. In the beginning I found it as chaotic as the period must have been for those that lived in Paris and other occupied territories.
Further in the book I grew accustomed to people and their actions.
Link: http://bookcrossing.com/---/9839077
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Doesn't count for my total reads

Frankenstein by Mary Shelly -- each time I read it I see more depth and insight. I just finished reading it with my seniors.
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by Muriel Spark follow the link to read my thoughts on it.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13425443
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by Karen Blixen An impressive read. Loved the way she described her way of living there.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14138673
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The edition I read is not a BC-book, so no link to my review. Thoughts on this book? Here goes:
Not counting the fact that I'm not much into vampire books, I still wanted this book read. It won't be on the list without a good reason, right?
Well, the book diasappointed me. I did not have any knowledge about the storyline, nor have I seen any Dracula or vampire film. I would have thought the book would have been more about him, his thoughts, desires, dislikes, fights than it actually was. It was the hunt for him that was the main issue, what I find rather strange.
So: happy I'm done and that it's off my 1001-tbr!
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6846681
A thought-provoking book, starting from the ambiguous “illusions” in the title and the Chateaubriandian motto. Journal entry only in Finnish, and I am still too exhausted to give a shortest synopsis in English. Just read the book!
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and I've read one so far(The Curious Tale of the Dog in the Nighttime). It's the only one I've ever read.
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-2- De koperen tuin, bij Simon Vestdijk bookcrossing.com/journal/12581868
English title: the copper garden.
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The Passion According to GH by Clarice Lispector, which is about a woman who squashes a cockroach (really). She squashes a cockroach then thinks a lot. I don't know if something was lost in translation from the Portuguese, but frankly I didn't understand most of it.

Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Maturin. A Gothic novel about a man who may have sold his soul to the Devil. Stories within stories tell of the people who have met him. Unfortunately it's rather full of lengthy rants about the awfulness of Catholicism (the author was an Anglican curate in Ireland), the excesses of the Spanish Inquisition and the sinfulness and corruption of monks. And he's rude about Hindus and Muslims and non-Conformists too.

Didn't really enjoy either :-(
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#4 Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
http://www.librarything.com/---/138603375

Since this is a reread it doesn't increase my total for the list but it was so long ago that I really didn't remember much of the book, just bits here and there. I thought listening to an audiobook of it would be the way to go but unfortunately the narrator, David Case, was quite horrible. However I persevered and now I have a clearer picture of all the characters and their interactions.
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Loved this book though there were a lot of characters to keep track of. I wish I had read this earlier.
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Silk by Alessandro Baricco
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13514477

As lovely a read as the fabric that gives the book its title. And it's a quick read so if you want something to knock off quickly I would recommend it.

I have now read 249 books from the list so I am going to pick one of the Canadian books on the list that I haven't read for #250.
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I'm alternating, because two of the three I simply can't read for hours on end:
Aesop's Fables,
Arabian Nights (unabriged adult version)
The Mandarins by Simone de Beauvoir

At my current pace it'll be a while before I finish them...
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#3 Silk by Alessandro Baricco http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13696880/

#4 Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann - this was actually a re-read, but since I have first read it in my late teens, way before discovering the 1001 list, and I didn't remember anything about it, I had counted as unread when marking my progress; now I can fully and wholeheartedly check it off the list :) I enjoyed it way more this time, I think the age and culture were more appropriate for it now.
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http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12067165

Daddy's girl turns melodramatically jealous when the widowed daddy has a new serious woman in addition to his former playmates. No good whatever you do ...

The book was a sensation of the time. Although I'm too old to be fascinated by the one-dimensional problematics of the book, I admit that the book is well written – bold and beautiful.
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I liked your review, ruzena, and can relate to what you say. Much of it may have to do with the fact that the author was only 18 when she wrote it.

My thoughts about the book when I read it:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12914884
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I recently discovered the 1001 list and put it up on my blog as a perpetual goal. So far I've read 39. You can see that here ---> http://www.belleslibrary.com/---/1001-books-you-must-read-before-you-die.html

This year, I've read 2 and abandoned 1. My goal for 2017 is 6.
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Never too late to join, elizardbreath. Welcome!

If you give me your life list total as at 2016-12-31 I can add you to the first list above as well. If I read your entry correctly it should be 37.
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Yes, 37 is correct for my year end/beginning total. Thank you!
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This book didn't speak to me as much as I thought it would.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14603041

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