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Challenge for 2017 to celebrate Canada's 150th Birthday

Since we are now in the latter half of November I thought I would post a challenge for next year before everyone gets caught up in the festive season madness. Canada will turn 150 in 2017 and I have decided to celebrate by reading lots of books by Canadian authors. In fact my personal challenge is to read at least 50 books by Canadians but I have a subsidiary challenge to include 15 books from the CBC 100 lists. What are the CBC 100 lists you ask? Well, the CBC (our national broadcaster) has compiled at least three lists of 100 books by Canadians that they think are among the best we have produced. There is one list called 100 Novels that Make you Proud to be Canadian:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100.html
There is another list called 100 True Stories that Make you Proud to be Canadian:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100truestories.html
The third list is 100 Young Adult Books that Make you Proud to be Canadian:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100ya.html

I know that there are lots of BookCrossers who like to read books by Canadians so I thought I would ask if anyone wanted to join me on this reading challenge. You don't have to read 15 from the lists, you can decide how many you want to read at the start of the year or you can just see how many you can pick up. Anyone up for this?

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Since we are now in the latter half of November I thought I would post a challenge for next year before everyone gets caught up in the festive season madness. Canada will turn 150 in 2017 and I have decided to celebrate by reading lots of books by Canadian authors. In fact my personal challenge is to read at least 50 books by Canadians but I have a subsidiary challenge to include 15 books from the CBC 100 lists. What are the CBC 100 lists you ask? Well, the CBC (our national broadcaster) has compiled at least three lists of 100 books by Canadians that they think are among the best we have produced. There is one list called 100 Novels that Make you Proud to be Canadian:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100.html
There is another list called 100 True Stories that Make you Proud to be Canadian:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100truestories.html
The third list is 100 Young Adult Books that Make you Proud to be Canadian:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100ya.html

I know that there are lots of BookCrossers who like to read books by Canadians so I thought I would ask if anyone wanted to join me on this reading challenge. You don't have to read 15 from the lists, you can decide how many you want to read at the start of the year or you can just see how many you can pick up. Anyone up for this?
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Well..

I've been doing a truly dismal job on my own Canadian challenge this year ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/526188 ) so I expect to still be working on it in 2017. (So far, I have 3 done - I haven't posted the BC book yet.)

So I can't promise to read 15, but I will be trying to read more Canadian books next year...

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This has not been one of my better years for reading. Not sure why. But I would like to attempt to read at least more CanLit for next year and so, thanks for the links to those lists. I will browse through them and see if I already own some of them. I actually have a lot of Canadian literature on my shelves that I have not yet got to so my own preference would be to read through what I have first. Heck, if I can do that, I'll have succeeded in this challenge!
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Although of course I'm desperately hoping you'll decide to annex Minnesota. :-(

It isn't always easy to find Canadian books here, unless they're by top sellers like Margaret Atwood. Even an excellent library system like mine doesn't have as much as I'd like. Maybe those of us in the USA could pool our resources, sort of a floating virtual book box, so we could share what we do have.

And I suppose it isn't fair to count re-reading books we've already read? And we don't get to count books we're already reading this year? I just got my library copy of 'Children of Earth and Sky' last night. The first chapter is terrific, and I'm NOT waiting until next year to finish!

But I've looked at that first CBC list a lot, and everything on it I've read, I've really liked. So I'm willing to do a little work to get some of the others, and I'll be happy to share. Anyway, I'm definitely in. Maybe I won't get all the way to fifteen, but if I don't try, for sure I'll never make it, right?

Thanks for starting this!
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Although of course I'm desperately hoping you'll decide to annex Minnesota. :-(

Gee, I wonder why? :(

It isn't always easy to find Canadian books here, unless they're by top sellers like Margaret Atwood. Even an excellent library system like mine doesn't have as much as I'd like. Maybe those of us in the USA could pool our resources, sort of a floating virtual book box, so we could share what we do have.

Yes, trick 1 is always FINDING those Canadian books. Once I get out from under purple58's books (my goal is the end of this month), maybe I can dig out my Canadian books and see what I can offer for a VBB. I do have several TBR...

And I will definitely take a look at those links...soonish?
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It isn't always easy to find Canadian books here, unless they're by top sellers like Margaret Atwood. Even an excellent library system like mine doesn't have as much as I'd like. Maybe those of us in the USA could pool our resources, sort of a floating virtual book box, so we could share what we do have.

Yes, trick 1 is always FINDING those Canadian books. Once I get out from under purple58's books (my goal is the end of this month), maybe I can dig out my Canadian books and see what I can offer for a VBB. I do have several TBR...

A VBB is a great idea. Right now I only have one CBC 100 book on my TBR pile but I am hoping to find more in book sales. If I am successful I would be willing to offer them in a VBB.
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I was planning on completing the two year Canadian Challenge during 2017, so what the heck - double the fun. Not sure what goal I'll give myself but count me in.
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I have read 11 of them and own several more that are as yet unread. Of the Bonus 10, I have read 4.

I think I will take the tbr ones already in my house and start with those. I wish postage rates from Canada weren't so exorbitant or I'd be offering to send books to the Americans. But unfortunately, I really can't.

Now, off to check out the other 2 lists
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I wish postage rates from Canada weren't so exorbitant or I'd be offering to send books to the Americans. But unfortunately, I really can't.

And I wouldn't expect you to. Postage has gotten so crazy. I miss international surface mail. :(
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Here's what i have on hand right now (from the first list):

- Alias Grace, Atwood
- Fall on your Knees, MacDonald
- Neuromancer, Gibson
- Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town, Leacock*
- The Handmaid's Tail, Atwood
- The Stone Angel, Laurence*
- The Stone Diaries, Shields
- Tigana, Kay

I'm also pretty sure I could pick up a copy of Scott Pilgrim by O'Malley.

* Available for loan only! My precious personal copy, not easy to replace here in the US.

Does listening to an audio version count? I have 'Tipping Point' on CD.
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As a huge audiobook fan, I would say absolutely it counts. Especially if it's unabridged, as most are, I think. It's the same as reading a book only you are having someone else read it to you. Double the pleasure! (ps - In my humble opinion, Gladwell is an excellent reader of his works. One of my faves!)
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Here's my score. I'll try to read the TBRs next year, at the very least.

-----------------------

100 Novels: 9 read - Anabel, Cereus Blooms at Night, Fall on Your Knees, Life of Pi, Obasan, Still Life, The Handmaid's Tale, The Outlander, The Stone Angel

2 TBR - Room, The Polished Hoe

Bonus 10: 2 read - Anne of Green Gables, Never Cry Wolf

2 TBR - Flashforward, Shoeless Joe

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100 True Stories: 1 read - And No Birds Sang

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100 Young Adult: 5 read - Anne of Green Gables, Elijah of Buxton, Little Brother, Obasan, The Breadwinner...but 2 are repeats from above.
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I'll try to read the TBRs next year, at the very least.

I'd also like to try to read some of the books from the YA list - a lot of those sound like I'd enjoy them. :)
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I won't list them all here but if my LibraryThing list is accurate (http://www.librarything.com/list/10448/all/CBC-Books-Canadas-100-%2B-bonus-10-Which-have-you-read%3F) then I have read 70 out of the 110.

Of the True Stories I have only read 13:
And No Birds Sang by Farley Mowat
Intolerable by Kamal Al-Solaylee
Klee Wyck by Emily Carr
Louis Riel by Chester Brown (graphic novel)
One Native Life by Richard Wagamese
Shake Hands with the Devil by Rome Dallaire
Tangles by Sarah Leavitt (graphic novel)
The Concubine's Children by Denise Chong
The Inconvenient Indian by Thomas King
The Last Spike by Pierre Berton
The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs
The Tiger by John Vaillant
The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

The one book I have on the TBR pile is:
Roughing it in the Bush by Susanna Moodie

It is a pretty small book and I would be prepared to offer to mail it out once I am finished it.

Of the YA list I have only read 9:
Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Child of Dandelions by Shenaaz Nanji
Him Standing by Richard Wagamese
In Search of April Raintree by Beatrice Culleton Mosionier
Obasan by Joy Kogawa
Sugar Falls by David Alexander Robertson (graphic novel)
Susceptible by Genevieve Castree (graphic novel)
True Confessions of a Heartless Girl by Martha Brooks
Who Has Seen the Wind by W. O. Mitchell

As to whether audiobooks count I would certainly say they do. I listened to The Tipping Point and also to Child of Dandelions. Graphic novels (or whatever you call them when they are nonfiction) are a great way to get through some of these books. I've noted the ones I have read but I am sure there are more on the lists. If I find them I will let you know.
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The one book I have on the TBR pile is:
Roughing it in the Bush by Susanna Moodie

It is a pretty small book and I would be prepared to offer to mail it out once I am finished it.



I'd like to sign up for a loan of this. Our huge library system has only one copy, which is restricted in in-library use. I promise to handle it with the greatest care, and return it in the same condition it arrived (crossing fingers for good postal handling). I don't think I currently have a book on your wishlist, but I can always send another pound of our special coffee blend.

This is for sometime in 2017, of course. First, we're entering the season in which only people driven by direst necessity have to queue up at the PO to mail a parcel, and second, I want to read it during the proper year for your challenge. But since it's referenced so widely by later writers, it might be a very popular request, and I wanted to get my name on the list right away.
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The one book I have on the TBR pile is:
Roughing it in the Bush by Susanna Moodie

It is a pretty small book and I would be prepared to offer to mail it out once I am finished it.



I'd like to sign up for a loan of this. Our huge library system has only one copy, which is restricted in in-library use. I promise to handle it with the greatest care, and return it in the same condition it arrived (crossing fingers for good postal handling). I don't think I currently have a book on your wishlist, but I can always send another pound of our special coffee blend.


I will certainly pass it on to you as soon as I have finished it. I am planning on reading it as the first book for my own challenge so soon in 2017 I hope to have it in the mail. If anyone else wants it you could always pass it on to them when you are finished.
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The one book I have on the TBR pile is:
Roughing it in the Bush by Susanna Moodie

It is a pretty small book and I would be prepared to offer to mail it out once I am finished it.



I'd like to sign up for a loan of this. Our huge library system has only one copy, which is restricted in in-library use. I promise to handle it with the greatest care, and return it in the same condition it arrived (crossing fingers for good postal handling). I don't think I currently have a book on your wishlist, but I can always send another pound of our special coffee blend.

This is for sometime in 2017, of course. First, we're entering the season in which only people driven by direst necessity have to queue up at the PO to mail a parcel, and second, I want to read it during the proper year for your challenge. But since it's referenced so widely by later writers, it might be a very popular request, and I wanted to get my name on the list right away.
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I'd be up for this, as I'd already been planning to read more CanLit next year to celebrate the 150th birthday. Some of the ones I hope to read or reread next year include:

Klee Wyck by Emily Carr
Fruit by Brian Francis
The Tin Flute by Gabrielle Roy
The Favourite Game by Leonard Cohen
The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence
Lives of Girls and Women by Alice Munro

Not all of these books are on the CBC lists, but all the authors are represented there, I believe. These are all small lightweight paperbacks and I'd be happy to send them to fellow BCers outside of Canada. (Jessibud is correct in that postage rates in Canada are ridiculously high, so I don't mail out heavier books anymore, but believe it or not, it's often cheaper for me to mail internationally than it is to mail within Canada!) Unfortunately, you will have to wait, as my reading list is quite full for the rest of November and December. However, if you are interested in reading any of these books in 2017, send me a PM and I'll try to get to it early in the new year.

I also have available now:
Fifth Business by Robertson Davies
The Manticore by Robertson Davies
... and probably a whole bunch more once I go through my shelves.

BTW, I've read 47 from the first CBC list, 16 from the True Stories list and 7 from the YA list.
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at least 6 from the first list as ABC TBRs on my bookshelf, and this is a great reason to read them and move them along. I had no idea (with the exception of Atwood) that the author was Canadian.
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I'm planning on getting most of the books from my glorious library, so there won't be links to Journal Entries. But I'd be happy to give a star rating on the 1-10 scale, and probably a sentence or two. Naturally, I hope other participants will also post some comments too; it's always good to see what books other people are enjoying.

I cheated a bit by starting early on O'Malley's Scott Pilgrim series, since I won't finish it until into 2017. Also, I have ordered '419' and it is in transit to my neighborhood branch right this minute.

Happy New Year all, and Happy Sesquicentennial Canada!
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I'm planning on getting most of the books from my glorious library, so there won't be links to Journal Entries. But I'd be happy to give a star rating on the 1-10 scale, and probably a sentence or two. Naturally, I hope other participants will also post some comments too; it's always good to see what books other people are enjoying.

If people can post a link to their review then that would be preferable. If not, then a brief note on how they liked it and whether it is a book that deserves a place on the list.
I cheated a bit by starting early on O'Malley's Scott Pilgrim series, since I won't finish it until into 2017. Also, I have ordered '419' and it is in transit to my neighborhood branch right this minute.

I also started before midnight last night with Roughing it in the Bush. Only got about 50 pages read before I heard the midnight fireworks bursting. They haven't even made it to the bush yet.

Happy New Year all, and Happy Sesquicentennial Canada!

We watched the Royal Canadian Air Farce New Year show last night and there was a cute bit with Don Ferguson and Peter Mansbridge doing highlights of the past 150 years. When they tried to sign off Ferguson stumbled over sesquicentennial several times before passing off to Mansbridge. With his usual aplomb, Mansbridge wished Canada Happy 150 Years.
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I do try to read Canadian lit on a regular basis, so I am giving myself an initial goal of 12 books.
I am starting with The Idea of Canada - Letter to a Nation by David Johnston
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but only because I read the back flap in December and realized the author was Canadian and put the book to the side until January

The House on Blackberry Hill by Donna Alward https://www.librarything.com/---/reviews

A library book that looked good - and it was. Billed as a romance, I thought it was really Women's Fiction. Abby inherits a house in Maine from a great-aunt she never heard of, who was her deceased grandmother's estranged sister. There's a few ghosts in the inherited house, plus family secrets that she needs to tease out while she's deciding whether to keep the house or sell it.
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The first book from the CBC 100 lists for me is Roughing it in the Bush by Susanna Moodie:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7327835

The reader alternately feels sorry for and appalled by Susanna and her husband. There is no doubt that they had many rough blows in terms of crop failures and illnesses and natural phenomena but they were able to afford a maid for the house and a hired man for the farm so they were doubtless better off than many immigrants. Mr. Moodie received an inheritance soon after they landed in Canada which he invested in shares in a steamboat without doing any checking into the management. They never received any money from this investment. Eventually they were saved by Moodie receiving a position as sheriff in a settled town and they moved from the bush.
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My first book for this challenge, Klee Wyck by Emily Carr, comes from the "True Stories" list.

Emily Carr is one of Canada's most famous artists and is particularly well known for her paintings inspired by Aboriginal Canadians and their environment. She was also a writer, and Klee Wyck is a memoir consisting of short pieces describing her experiences interacting and occasionally living among the Aboriginals. "Klee Wyck" was a name given to her by the Ucluelet people and it means "Laughing One". That seems appropriate to me, as the stories are full of humour, warmth and interesting observations. Some of the writing might be perceived as politically incorrect these days, but Carr's love and admiration for the Aboriginal people are apparent.
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I loved that book when I read it a few years ago.
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I'm offering Klee Wyck for a bookring here:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/538120

It's a very small book so it won't take much time to read and shipping costs should be low.
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Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan. This story toggles back and forth between Berlin in 1939, Paris 1940 and Berlin in 1992 and centres around a group of young jazz musicians, some from Baltimore, some from Germany; some black and some white, one Jewish, and one, Hiero, a German-born man, from a white German mother and a black African father, considered *stateless* in Nazi-era Germany. Edugyan paints a vivid picture of the times; her language is visual, sensual and allows the reader to hear the voices, see and smell the fear of being on the run, and feel the passion of the music. The *present day* 1992 sections serve to peel back the layers of the back stories and give closure. I was quite drawn in and wanted to read and not put it down. (Louis Armstrong features in this story too). Yet, at the very end, I felt confused, almost let down. I am not really sure what I was expecting but it wasn't what I found. Overall, I would recommend the book. I do need to call my friend who insisted I read it and talk about that ending. Maybe I just missed something.

This is Edugyan's second novel, published in 2011, and although it won and was a finalist for several prizes, it only now came onto my radar. I will seek out her first novel, though, because her writing is really beautiful.
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Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan. Yet, at the very end, I felt confused, almost let down. I am not really sure what I was expecting but it wasn't what I found. Overall, I would recommend the book.

This is Edugyan's second novel, published in 2011, and although it won and was a finalist for several prizes, it only now came onto my radar. I will seek out her first novel, though, because her writing is really beautiful.

I thought this was a beautiful book when I read it. I think the ending was deliberately vague so that the reader could find their own ending. Here's my review on LibraryThing from when I read it: http://www.librarything.com/---/79898804
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I really should pop in to this forum more often but if late-comers are welcome I'm in.

I have read a goodly number of the 100 novels (76) but I've got 6 more gathering dust on my shelf because I just haven't been able to bring myself to read them when something more sparkly comes along ( Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance is dauntingly huge).

I've also got three of the nonfiction books that I've also been ignoring.

So I'm challenging myself to read those nine.

And as an incentive I'm going to allow myself to pick a new book from those lists every time I finish three. I've been wanting to read Nobody Cries at Bingo by Dawn Dumont. So once I've read three of my ignored books I get to hit the bookstore.

So all told that will be twelve books. A book a month should be doable.
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I really should pop in to this forum more often but if late-comers are welcome I'm in.

I have read a goodly number of the 100 novels (76) but I've got 6 more gathering dust on my shelf because I just haven't been able to bring myself to read them when something more sparkly comes along ( Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance is dauntingly huge).

I've also got three of the nonfiction books that I've also been ignoring.

So I'm challenging myself to read those nine.

And as an incentive I'm going to allow myself to pick a new book from those lists every time I finish three. I've been wanting to read Nobody Cries at Bingo by Dawn Dumont. So once I've read three of my ignored books I get to hit the bookstore.

So all told that will be twelve books. A book a month should be doable.

Lovely to have you here. Welcome.
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Stripped to the Bone by Ghada Alatrash https://www.librarything.com/---/reviews

an ARC that really needs a heavy editor to make these short stories more readable.
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This is #1 of my 15, and it's in the Novels list. The title comes from the section of the Nigerian Criminal Code that deals with fraud. My only disappointment with it is that almost the entire book is set in Nigeria. Even the parts in Canada are mostly the victim's daughter learning about how the email frauds work. There's nothing wrong with this - in fact Ferguson does a really good job showing different points of view and building suspense. But I'm somewhat surprised that a book from a collection called "Novels that make you proud to be Canadian" wouldn't show more about Canadians.

I couldn't help remembering a Dr. Phil episode about a woman who had fallen for such a scheme, thinking she was going to bring her soulmate into her life. I believe she started the show thinking Dr. Phil had extracted him from all the perils he (the perp) had been writing about as an excuse to raise money, and they would share a dramatic onstage first meeting. Dr Phil showed a running total of the amounts she had sent on a gigantic backdrop screen, and as the total grew larger and the excuses flimsier ($50,000 US to pay a nanny's salary?!), her face began to crumple. By the end of the program, not only did she have all kinds of proof that the so-called man of her dreams never existed, but she had to face the fact that the millions of people in Dr. Phil's syndicated audience had watched her descent into idiocy. Well, I suppose if it discouraged anyone else from making the same mistake it was worth it. But I still wince at the public humiliation.

Pooker3, I'm quite impressed. If there were any US institution with the stature of the CBC to make up such challenging '100 Best' lists, I doubt very much that I'd find I'd read as many as 76 of the hundred. Maybe you've already read it, but if you're looking for something as a break from the "dauntingly huge" volumes, I sure recommend 'Scott Pilgrim' by Bryan Lee O'Malley. It's actually a series, and DrSlump & I are halfway through. It's blindingly imaginative and laugh-out-loud funny. Guaranteed to make you proud to be Canadian!
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This is #1 of my 15, and it's in the Novels list. The title comes from the section of the Nigerian Criminal Code that deals with fraud. My only disappointment with it is that almost the entire book is set in Nigeria. Even the parts in Canada are mostly the victim's daughter learning about how the email frauds work. There's nothing wrong with this - in fact Ferguson does a really good job showing different points of view and building suspense. But I'm somewhat surprised that a book from a collection called "Novels that make you proud to be Canadian" wouldn't show more about Canadians.

I'm sorry you were disappointed that the book doesn't show more about Canadians but as a nation that celebrates our multiculturalism quite a lot of "Canadian" literature actually is not set in Canada. And not just immigrants and children of immigrants write about life outside of the Canadian borders. As just one example the fantastic The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill has only one small section set in Canada and yet it is a book that makes me proud to be Canadian. It is a searing portrayal of slavery and an empathetic look at a black woman's life and a gripping historical novel all in one. There are lots of books on the list that are set in Canada and show Canadians but plenty that show Canadian literature is world literature.
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Oh yuck, I have slid into the role of the overbearing Yank, willing to arbitrate any other country's literature (or government, if you don't look slippy). Thank you, gypsysmom, for a gentle corrective. Of course you're right about celebrating multiculturalism, and that goes on the list of many ways you're ahead of us as a nation.

I was thinking of choosing only books set in Canada for the rest of the challenge. But now I'm going to use this opportunity to open my mind a bit, and explore some varieties of literature where the common denominator is excellence in writing. So I'll be very grateful if you and the other participants continue to post your recommendations.

My next book, already en route to my library branch, is 'A History of Reading' by Alberto Manguel. Who could resist a title like that?
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Thanks for the recommendation JudySlump612. I haven't read any of the Scott Pilgrim series. It has never occurred to me that I might enjoy them. I'll make Vol. 1 one of my "reward" books. I could use something light these days. What with the frigid and snowy last few weeks ( although warming up a bit now) and the unfathomable results of your recent election. Plus I'm currently reading The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. While I agree that this report is something all Canadians should read it is not a story that makes you proud to be a Canadian.

As for totting up 76 books read, many of the books have been in the limelight on CBC before via the annual Canada Reads competition/debates and I have almost always made it a point to read all five of the contenders. And then there's the fact that I've been reading for more than a couple of decades now. :)
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I picked from the YA list for my second read. That is the list that I have read the fewest of (only 9) so I thought it would be a good choice. The book is Lost in the Barrens by Farley Mowat. Most of the action takes place in the area which is now called Nunavut so it gave me an entry for that territory in hyphen8's Canadian reading challenge.

This was a library book so I did my review on LibraryThing which I present here:
http://www.librarything.com/---/137765586

I really enjoyed it and I do think it deserves a place on the list. I was surprised that there were only 2 copies in the whole Winnipeg Public Library holdings. It seems to me that a classic like this that takes part partly in Manitoba and shows aboriginal life should be more widely available.
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I was downtown today and figured I would go check the library's book sale tables to see what I could score. Although I didn't have these lists with me I found 7 books that appear on the lists, five of which I have not read. The other two I would be willing to send out to any of the participants in this challenge.
#1 Late Nights on Air by Elizabeth Hay (for anyone who trying to do the 2016/17 Canadian Reading Challenge started by hyphen8, this takes place in NWT)
#2 Bear by Marian Engel (very small book so could be read quickly and passed on if more than one person is interested)

As I finish the other 5 I will post if I am going to be able to send them out by mail. They are all hard covers so it may be too pricey to send some of them. I guess I won't keep you in suspense until I read them and post. Here are the ones I will read first:
#3 Held by Edeet Ravel (YA about a girl who is abducted in Greece)
#4 A House in the Sky by Amanda Lindhout & Sara Corbett (non-fiction about Lindhout's fifteen months of captivity in Somalia)
#5 Thunder over Kandahar by Sharon E. McKay (YA about two Afghani girls trying to escape the Taliban)
#6 Tilt by Alan Cumyn (YA "A funny, sexy novel about a teenaged boy's obsessions as he lives through an impossibly absurd time of life.")
#7 Certainty by Madeleine Thien (looking forward to this one which is the debut novel of the author who won the Giller and the Governor General's prize last year for Do Not Say We Have Nothing)
ETA: I just discovered I have one more book from the lists on Mount TBR
#8 As For Me and My House by Sinclair Ross (another small book that could be easily read and mailed "A human drama of hope lost and found, set against the sweeping backdrop of the vast Canadian prairies.")

Anything look good to you?
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Before this library book had been in the house for an hour, I put this on my Wish List. What a brilliant book! It's more than a history, although the research that went into this is staggering. It's a series of essays on all kinds of different aspects of reading. Because I spend so much time with audiobooks, I especially liked the chapters on Reading Aloud and Being Read To. But every section was simply fascinating. Highly recommended to anyone who likes to read.
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Before this library book had been in the house for an hour, I put this on my Wish List. What a brilliant book! It's more than a history, although the research that went into this is staggering. It's a series of essays on all kinds of different aspects of reading. Because I spend so much time with audiobooks, I especially liked the chapters on Reading Aloud and Being Read To. But every section was simply fascinating. Highly recommended to anyone who likes to read.

I've been meaning to read this ever since I saw it reviewed in the Globe and Mail. I think it will have to be one of my 15 for this challenge.
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I've wanted to read this one too. t's on my wishlist and one of these days....
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As For Me and My House by Sinclair Ross:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11258525

What an amazing book! I felt like I was living right there in the Saskatchewan Dust Bowl in the Dirty Thirties. Highly recommended!

I am prepared to send this to anyone participating in this challenge. Just pm me with your mailing address.
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As For Me and My House by Sinclair Ross:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11258525

What an amazing book! I felt like I was living right there in the Saskatchewan Dust Bowl in the Dirty Thirties. Highly recommended!


I'm glad to hear your positive comments, as I recently picked up a copy of this book at a used bookstore.
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This is #7 for me, and at this stage I think it's my favorite so far. Gypsysmom is right: "What an amazing book!" It's not a long read, but it's powerful. I read it quickly, then renewed it from the library so I could read it again after I had somewhat digested it. I think this worked well, since once I got a sense of Ross' message, I could see in how many ways he'd supported it, via small episodes and turns of phrase. This also gives me the feeling that it's skillfully enough written that it will capture and reflect whatever a variety of readers bring to it. I think I'll try to read it again in a few years and see what catches my attention next time.

Reading this library book was a kind of special experience because it's definitely a veteran copy. The back has the old envelope with the 'date due' card, and the first stamp is for March 3, 1943. It makes me wonder how many readers this copy has had, and what they all thought of it. The pages are getting a bit tawny, but otherwise the book is in excellent shape.
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Wow! Seven books read already. You are rocketing through them. And I'm glad you liked As For Me and My House. It gives a real feeling of life on the prairies during the Depression plus his writing is beautiful.
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As For Me and My House by Sinclair Ross:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11258525

What an amazing book! I felt like I was living right there in the Saskatchewan Dust Bowl in the Dirty Thirties. Highly recommended!

I am prepared to send this to anyone participating in this challenge. Just pm me with your mailing address.

I can't imagine that it makes sense for you to mail it to the US, but I'll keep an eye out for a copy to read. :)

<<< EDIT: thank you gypsysmom. >>>

I'm going nowhere fast on this challenge but I am seeing lots of recommendations for interesting books.
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I recently finished Fruit by Brian Francis, one of the books on the "100 Novels" list. My copy is actually the US edition, entitled The Secret Fruit of Peter Paddington.

Here is my review, from my journal entry at:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14418700

This is a quirky and humorous novel about an overweight gay adolescent boy trying to figure out and come to terms with his sexuality, body image, family relationships, friendships and all the other things that teenagers worry about.

This volume is the American edition of the novel entitled Fruit, which was a finalist in the 2009 Canada Reads event. According to Brian Francis, there are very minor differences in the two editions, which he describes in an appendix. The appendices also include an interview with the author and a particularly interesting comparison of Canadian and American chocolate bars.
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I recently finished Fruit by Brian Francis, one of the books on the "100 Novels" list. My copy is actually the US edition, entitled The Secret Fruit of Peter Paddington.
The appendices also include an interview with the author and a particularly interesting comparison of Canadian and American chocolate bars.

It would almost be worth reading for the comparison. I hope one of our American challengers will take you up on your offer to send it.
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I'd be happy to send Fruit by Brian Francis (on the "100 Novels" list) as an RABCK to anyone interested in reading it. Just send me a PM.

As mentioned in the review in my last post, this is the American edition of the book, entitled The Secret Fruit of Peter Paddington.
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This is one our library doesn't have. I'm sending you a PM, since you're so generous as to offer. And you have some interesting titles on your wishlist, so I'm thinking, thinking...
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Received your PM. I will be happy to send this to you, JudySlump612!
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born in the US, but now lives in Ontario

Undercover Protector by Molly O'keefe http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5999351

A romance - I wasn't expecting to find a Canadian amongst these fluff books, but I'm checking EVERY author's bio this year, not just the more famous ones.
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Knocked another quick one off by listening while I was knitting. Never Cry Wolf by Farley Mowat is on the 10 additional novels list. Novel, you say, I thought it was non-fiction? And that is what most early readers of it thought but it came to light that Mowat had fictionalized his investigation into wolf culture to a large extent. It's still a very entertaining book and it did change the way the world viewed wolves.
http://www.librarything.com/---/139100808
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Maybe the problem is in the translation. I've noticed, with other languages as well, that I never quite feel the effortless immersion that I do with English language books.

The other problem is that I found the book horrifying. We never even meet most of the sixteen children, and of those we do, in one short season: one dies, one goes into a brothel, an underage worker loses his fingers in a factory accident, and the luckiest sees clearly that his life of petty crime will take him straight to prison.

I do want to read some French literature for the challenge, so if you can give me some recommendations I'll try again.
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Yes, Marie-Claire Blais's writing can be quite disturbing.

Another French-Canadian writer who is very popular is Gabrielle Roy. I have a couple of her books that I hope to reread this year and possibly send out as RABCKs or rings. Although it's a children's picture book, a wonderful book to read is Roch Carrier's The Hockey Sweater.
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Maybe the problem is in the translation. I've noticed, with other languages as well, that I never quite feel the effortless immersion that I do with English language books.
I do want to read some French literature for the challenge, so if you can give me some recommendations I'll try again.

If you think the problem might be the translation I recommend that you give books translated by Sheila Fischman a try. She often wins awards for her French to English translations. Ru by Kim Thuy was translated by her and so was The Little Girl Who Was Too Fond of Matches by Gaetan Soucy. I also remember liking Kamouraska by Anne Hebert which was translated by Norman Shapiro.

mathgirl40 recommended Gabrielle Roy who I love since she is a native of Manitoba. The Tin Flute by her is one of the additional 10 books for the novels list.
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Sheila Fischman has also translated all of Roch Carrier's books, I believe. He is a favourite of mine.
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Here's a link to the BC Journal: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7327835/
Now that I'm finished, if gypsysmom doesn't object, I'd be happy to pass it on to another reader.

Mathgirl and gypsysmom, I did already read 'The Tin Flute' based on gypsysmom's recommendation. Did Gabrielle Roy move to Quebec, or do you know why she set 'The Tim Flute' there? I liked it, but I'm not counting it toward this year's challenge. Hmm, gypsysmom, you didn't actually come out and say we could only count books we were reading for the first time, I just assumed that. What's your official ruling?

And mathgirl, if you do decide to set up some bookrings for any of Roy's books, I certainly would sign up.
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Here's a link to the BC Journal: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7327835/
Now that I'm finished, if gypsysmom doesn't object, I'd be happy to pass it on to another reader.

Certainly I don't object.

Mathgirl and gypsysmom, I did already read 'The Tin Flute' based on gypsysmom's recommendation. Did Gabrielle Roy move to Quebec, or do you know why she set 'The Tim Flute' there?

Yes, after teaching in Manitoba for a number of years she spent a year in Europe then came back to Manitoba briefly and finally moved to Montreal where she married and settled down (but she did return to Manitoba quite frequently). Several of her books set in Manitoba are Where Nests the Water Hen, The Street of Riches, The Road Past Altamont, and Children of My Heart.
I liked it, but I'm not counting it toward this year's challenge. Hmm, gypsysmom, you didn't actually come out and say we could only count books we were reading for the first time, I just assumed that. What's your official ruling?

Well, I think the idea is to increase the number of books you have read but if you did read one book again this year you could count it.

And mathgirl, if you do decide to set up some bookrings for any of Roy's books, I certainly would sign up.

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4. Anne's House of Dreams by L.M.Montgomery http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7960970

#5 in this classic series about Anne Shirley (now Blythe as she marries Gilbert in this book)
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4. Anne's House of Dreams by L.M.Montgomery http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7960970

#5 in this classic series about Anne Shirley (now Blythe as she marries Gilbert in this book)

I'd reread this book recently myself. I love the Anne stories.
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as noted in #3, she's a Canadian Immigrant

Family at Stake by Molly O'Keefe http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6181029

I liked this one better, more plot to it, although it is a happy-ending romantic read
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Mathgirl40 generously shared this with me, so here's a link to the journal:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14353437/

If she doesn't object, I'll hold the book on reserve for any future readers in this challenge. It's short (111 pages) and quite delightful!
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Mathgirl40 generously shared this with me, so here's a link to the journal:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14353437/

If she doesn't object, I'll hold the book on reserve for any future readers in this challenge. It's short (111 pages) and quite delightful!


No objections at all! I am fine with whatever you want to do with this book. I'm so glad you enjoyed it.
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FROM THE BACK COVER:
Two babies are abandoned in a Montreal orphanage in the winter of 1910. Before long, their talents emerge: Pierrot is a piano prodigy; Rose lights up even the dreariest room with her dancing and comedy. As they travel around the city performing clown routines, the children fall in love with each other and dream up a plan for the most extraordinary and seductive circus show the world has ever seen.

Separated as teenagers, sent off to work as servants during the Great Depression, both descend into the city's underworld, dabbling in sex, drugs and theft in order to survive. But when Rose and Pierrot finally reunite beneath the snowflakes after years of searching and desperate poverty the possibilities of their childhood dreams are renewed, and they'll go to extreme lengths to make them come true. Soon, Rose, Pierrot and their troupe of clowns and chorus girls have hit New York, commanding the stage as well as the alleys, and neither the theatre nor the underworld will ever look the same.


MY REVIEW:
Oh my good god, someone hand this woman a #baileysprize already! Queue utter gushfest of how much I ❤ Heather O'Neill. I am conflicted to whether I want to be her friend so I can pick her amazingly dark and twisty brain, or whether I infact wish I was actually dark and twisty enough myself to be one of her characters.....they always have so much fun don't they!
Set in Montreal during The Great Depression, this book is beautifully crafted through lyrical, poetic and somewhat mystical prose. Love, loss, hatred, impulse, desire, revenge.....its really got it all.
In part, I am a little sad that I didn't tie in the reading of "The Lonely Hearts Hotel" on #IWD2017, because it truly slams a powerful whirlwind of a female lead character in your face, with such force that I think I am in love with Rose, just a little bit.

I do however need to confess that I cannot help but hate Heather O'Neill when she takes away her delicately created lead characters by way of one of her books ending. As with Nouschka, I feel like I am mourning the loss of Rose in my life, having run out of pages of the book to devour.

As I often find when reading a Heather O'Neill book, I end up photographing certain paragraphs of the book, with a keen desire to paint my walls with them:
"The only time the world shows you any favour, or cuts you any slack, is during that very brief period of courtship where the world is trying to fuck you for the first time"

I have read a few reviews of this book where it has been rated really poorly because it doesn't live up to the "blurb it has echoes of The Night Circus, which is my favourite book in all of ever" and I can only feel sorry for those readers who seemed to miss the memo that Heather O'Neill is so very much stand alone in her style, that comparing her writing or books to anyone or anything already out there is just misguided.
Heather O'Neill sincerely needs to keep writing.....MORE, MORE, MORE!

**ARC digital copy received from NetGalley in return for an honest reader review**
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Very nice review! I've not read this one yet, but I loved her two earlier novels. She really does have a unique voice.
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I won't count this twice but it did show up on two of the lists, Fiction and YA. Because I'm kind of new at reading Graphic Novels, it took me a while to really get into this, but it certainly paid off the effort. I liked the drawing a little better than the writing (the two Tamaki women are cousins). That may be because, as I move to the close of my 70th decade, it's getting harder for me to identify with high school struggles. But this one had some elements which make it stand out. If any of you are looking for something quick, it's only 140 pages, and it moved and impressed me.

J4shaw, thanks for the great review of 'Lonely Hearts Hotel.' I put in my library request immediately, and I'm currently #17 on the list for 7 copies, so it shouldn't take TOO long.
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I was sad to find out that Richard Wagamese died a few weeks ago at the age of 61. I think he was a very talented and underrated writer. I mention him here because his works show up in all three of the CBC lists. Indian Horse appears on the novels list and I highly recommend it, but I liked Medicine Walk even better.
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I was sad to find out that Richard Wagamese died a few weeks ago at the age of 61. I think he was a very talented and underrated writer. I mention him here because his works show up in all three of the CBC lists. Indian Horse appears on the novels list and I highly recommend it, but I liked Medicine Walk even better.

Thank you for posting about his death. I saw it on the CBC website but we were on the road and it was hard to post anything. I have read all three of his books that are on the lists and I would be hard pressed to decide which was my favourite. I think Indian Horse is more autobiographical so if people want to get an appreciation of the challenges he faced that might be a good one to try.
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Last one in my possession by this author
Unexpected Family by MOLLY O'KEEFE http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12901087 a transplant to Canada

Unless I find another romance Canadian, the rest will be heavier reading for 2017
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From the lists I had already read:

Anne of Green Gable, A Fine Balance, Three Day Road, Through Black Spruce, The Orenda, Tale of the Time Being

and was inspired to read Laughing All The Way To The Mosque, which I've just finished and found amusing, and which is why I'm posting here.

Of those I would say that Joseph Boyden's Three Day Road is the most extra-ordinary: I read it several times before passing it on to an ex-pat Canadian. I was disappointed by Through Black Spruce, but enjoyed The Orenda as I like things that aren't stories of modern everyday life, but it's not a tale for the squeamish.
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From the lists I had already read

and was inspired to read Laughing All The Way To The Mosque, which I've just finished and found amusing, and which is why I'm posting here.

Of those I would say that Joseph Boyden's Three Day Road is the most extra-ordinary: I read it several times before passing it on to an ex-pat Canadian. I was disappointed by Through Black Spruce, but enjoyed The Orenda as I like things that aren't stories of modern everyday life, but it's not a tale for the squeamish.

The Orenda is one of those books that people feel strongly about, either in favour or against. I agree it is not for the squeamish but if you can get past that it is a fabulous book. I was lucky enough to hear Boyden read from the book and answer questions about it so that probably helped my reading experience.

I hope you will keep reading for this challenge. There are lots of great books on all the lists.
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but enjoyed The Orenda as I like things that aren't stories of modern everyday life, but it's not a tale for the squeamish.


I liked it very much, though you're right that it's not for the squeamish! My comments: https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13361584/

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but enjoyed The Orenda as I like things that aren't stories of modern everyday life, but it's not a tale for the squeamish.


I liked it very much, though you're right that it's not for the squeamish! My comments: https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13361584/


Yup, you summed up what I thought too, that Christophe the missionary is an arrogant a*****e imposing his "right" view of life and death on the "wrong" view of the First Nation people, even though they are far more in tune with everything around them than he is. They at least accommodate him even if they don't understand him.
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but enjoyed The Orenda as I like things that aren't stories of modern everyday life, but it's not a tale for the squeamish.


I liked it very much, though you're right that it's not for the squeamish! My comments: https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13361584/

Nice review, GoryDetails. This is one book that I plan to read eventually, and given your comments, I think I will try to find the audiobook version.
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Pooker3 dug this book out of her TBR pile to read for this challenge and then very kindly brought it to a meeting where I grabbed it. This is a great book that lovingly explores Islam and relationships. Set in Harar, Ethiopia in the period just before the Ethiopian revolution and in London, England when Margaret Thatcher was in power it also provides a good historical look at societies in crisis. For those who are looking to read books about Canada this one is not for you as there are only a few tangential mentions of Canada. It qualifies as Canadian because Camilla Gibb lives in Toronto.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8066885
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This was pure fun, and I recommend it for NancyNova to relieve the dread of "heavier reading." It's a a light-hearted story of a young man who must defeat all of his current girlfriend's ex-lovers to win the right to continue the relationship. So you see, NancyNova, romance! But no description can catch the sudden flashes of unexpected humour. A lot of the story involves references to manga/anime, electronic games, and the band(s) that Scott's involved with. Probably it would be a huge hit with someone closer in age to Scott (twentysomething), but DrSlump & I are both 69, and we loved it anyway.

And an additional comment: this was originally written/drawn between 2004 and 2010. The CBC list was compiled sometime in 2014. Meanwhile, O'Malley's next book, 'Seconds,' was published on July 15, 2014, and it's even better. The drawing and writing are both more impressive, the cheeky humour is still going strong, and the subject, how we'd screw up if we had the power to change our past, is immortal. I don't know how often the CBC plans to update its Best 100 lists, but IMHO this deserves to be added in the next round.
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I'd read Seconds recently and liked it very much. One of the members of our parent-child book-club chose it last month and it made for good discussion. I'm planning to try the Scott Pilgrim series sometime, so I'm glad to see your positive review of it.
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I finished Obasan by Joy Kogawa, which appears on both the 100 Novels and 100 Young Adult Books lists. Though I frequently found the writing beautiful and poetic, I can't say that I enjoyed this book immensely, as I found it difficult to warm up to the characters and I found the pacing uneven. The story is also incredibly bleak. However, it is an important book that is worthwhile for Canadians (and others) to read. The book shows us a regrettable time in Canada's history, when Japanese-Canadians were deported or detained in internment camps during World War II, losing their rights as Canadian citizens. They were finally given an official apology and compensation from the Canadian government in the late 1980's. Another book about this topic that I'd read a couple of years ago and liked very much is Requiem by Frances Itani.
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I read Obasan many years ago. Kogawa is a good writer. I also read and loved Requiem and love most of what I've read by Itani. Another one I read a lot of years ago was David Suzuki's first autobiography, called Metamorphosis. It told of his own growing up years and how his family was affected by the same issues as Kogawa's. I remember finding it odd (and somewhat self-centred) that he hardly ever mentioned his sisters (he had 3, one was his twin, if I am remembering correctly). But being the only boy was of cultural importance, as it is in so many cultures, so maybe that's why.
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The story is also incredibly bleak. However, it is an important book that is worthwhile for Canadians (and others) to read. The book shows us a regrettable time in Canada's history, when Japanese-Canadians were deported or detained in internment camps during World War II, losing their rights as Canadian citizens. They were finally given an official apology and compensation from the Canadian government in the late 1980's. Another book about this topic that I'd read a couple of years ago and liked very much is Requiem by Frances Itani.

Obasan was a worthwhile read: I grew up knowing about the internment here in the US (some of my relatives went) but didn't realize until I was an adult that it happened in Canada too (I wasn't terribly surprised, just saddened). The Canadian experience was both similar to and different from the American one, so it was good to learn more about it.

Requiem is on my TLF (to look for) list.
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Obasan was a worthwhile read: I grew up knowing about the internment here in the US (some of my relatives went) but didn't realize until I was an adult that it happened in Canada too (I wasn't terribly surprised, just saddened). The Canadian experience was both similar to and different from the American one, so it was good to learn more about it.

It is indeed sad that citizens of both countries had to suffer in this way, and I'm sorry to hear that your own relatives were affected. I too should read more about the American experiences.
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It is indeed sad that citizens of both countries had to suffer in this way, and I'm sorry to hear that your own relatives were affected. I too should read more about the American experiences.

Over the weekend I saw (but didn't buy) a newly-translated memoir of the camps from UH Press: An Internment Odyssey: Haisho Tenten by Suikei Furuya, one of the internees from Hawaii. I looked up my great-grandfather in the index. Looks like they got his name slightly wrong, but apparently he received his letter of parole in Santa Fe on February 21, 1945 - which I presume meant he was allowed to go home to Kona. $26 seemed a little high to buy the book for a one-line mention, but I may break down eventually and buy a copy eventually to actually read. :)
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Rainbow Valley by L.M.Montgomery http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13017784

I seem to have gotten out of order by reading #7 before #6. Oh well - another check box for a Canadian author & adding to the July release box.
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by Catherine Gildiner

This is a memoir of the author's childhood in a small town on the US side of Niagara Falls. She had an unconventional childhood and she makes the most of it in this book.
http://www.librarything.com/---/140603158
I liked it quite a bit but I did have some doubts about the verisimilitude of some of the stories. Not sure if I believe it is a true story that makes me proud to be Canadian since it all took place in the US. On the other hand I chastised JudySlump612 for being disappointed in a story that didn't have much to do with Canada. Gildiner is quite an entertainer.
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I haven't been actively seeking books for this, but have stumbled across some, including:

Will Ferguson: How to Be a Canadian ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14402506/ ), a humorous look at his country, and the VERY different Hitching Rides with Buddha ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/4111580/ ), about his attempt to hitchhike the length of Japan to follow the cherry-blossom season.

Margaret Atwood: Bluebeard's Egg and Other Stories ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14252942/ ), an anthology that, at first, I mistook for a memoir - some of her stories read very much like autobiographical works.

Recommendation: I've really enjoyed the work of Edward O. Phillips - generally, very dry comedies-of-manners, sometimes with a mystery aspect. Sunday's Child ( https://www.bookcrossing.com/---/4206279/ ) is the first of a series about an aging Toronto lawyer; I've really enjoyed those books, but Phillips' stand-alone works are a lot of fun too. I don't know if he's on any of the "Canadian reads" lists, but he's worth checking out.
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This book by Madeleine Thien certainly belongs on the list. There are lots of themes developed in it but perhaps the most important is that most things in life are uncertain but a few things can be counted on like nature and friends.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14396964
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This book by Madeleine Thien certainly belongs on the list. There are lots of themes developed in it but perhaps the most important is that most things in life are uncertain but a few things can be counted on like nature and friends.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14396964

Another book I'll have to add to the wishlist! I'd read her latest book, the Booker-shortlisted Do Not Say We Have Nothing, and thought it was brilliant.
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After reading JudySlump612's review of the Scott Pilgrim series (and also having liked Seconds by the same author), I decided to borrow the first volume from the library. This was definitely a fun read, with a wide range of quirky characters and great use of the Toronto setting. I found the scenes of the basement band particularly funny, as my husband and his friends get together to practice blues tunes in our basement every week.
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DrSlump & I both loved this - it's a great example of classic hard SF. Given the premise of a mysterious alien intervention (in this case, a membrane around the earth), most of the book is imaginative but logical extrapolation of human reaction. What new technologies would we employ? How would our social structures change? This is also interwoven with a love story and a coming-of-age story, both with excellent pacing and detail. And the writing throughout is simply spellbinding. The book certainly deserved its Hugo and other awards.

It happens we're currently listening to (and loving) 'Station Eleven' by Emily St. John Mandel, and DrSlump made an interesting connection. 'Spin' isn't as apocalyptic as 'Station Eleven' but in both, one of the reactions is the birth of new fringe religions. The rationale seems to be "Lots of people died but we didn't, therefore we must deserve to live because we're better than everyone around us." The corollaries coming close behind are "Since we're better than everyone around us, we can shut ourselves away and and indulge in seriously questionable practices. And if the people around us aren't as good as we are, we're justified in treating them as badly as we like."

I haven't read all that much apocalyptic SF. Does anyone want to comment on how common this development is? Well, there is 'The Handmaid's Tale,' but in that case the fringe religion caused the disaster rather than the other way around.
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That sounds good - will have to hunt up a copy!

I enjoyed Station Eleven ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14441100/ ), though as it's mostly set in the US I hadn't connected it with this challenge.

Re apocalyptic SF and fringe religions: it is fairly common, either for a new cult to arise after the end, or for previously-existing - and usually niche/cult/extremist - religions to gain followers. It does seem to be a common and, perhaps, not-unreasonable reaction to having one's entire world turned upside down; any group that can offer comfort might seem appealing.

In many cases, the "cult" forms around a series of rules against hazardous activities, common-sense at the time but turning into seemingly-random taboos after a generation or two. Sometimes the rules are as much for keeping the population under control - which can be a survival technique as well as a power-play - as for saving them from contaminated food or radioactive/alien-haunted/zombie-infested areas.

It does seem that this process, however well-intentioned in the beginning, is often played as a villainous thing if not outright horrifying; it'd be nice to find some benign faith-based communities once in a while, where they actually explain the reasons for any apparently-arbitrary rules - and don't summarily kidnap/torture/execute people who don't agree with them!
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Definitely have to get a copy of this. Thanks for the great review. I agree with Gory that there are books that combine the dystopia future with a rise of religion. I found this article by doing a google search:
http://blogs.iac.gatech.edu/---/2027/
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I'll echo JudySlump612's recommendation for Spin. It's one of my very favourite sci-fi novels, and I do read a lot of sci-fi. I've already given away 2 BC-registered copies of the book and I wish I had more to give away! It's one book that I wouldn't hesitate to recommend to sci-fi fans as well as those who don't normally read sci-fi.

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but I am reading a book by a Canadian author and so far I like it.
One of my current reads:
Motorcycles & Sweetgrass by Drew Hayden Taylor.
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Anne of Ingleside http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8305321

Last of the series where Anne is the heroine, although the books continue with the children.
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8. Anne of Ingleside by L.M.Montgomery http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8305321 the last of an Anne books, where she's one of the main characters. Now it's on to the children

9. Winning over the Wrangler by Linda Ford https://www.librarything.com/---/reviews

Both Canadian born authors. Alas, I'm stuck in the provinces of PEI and Alberta over and over again though

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10. O Little Town of Glory Judith Bowen http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6574538

Present day, Alberta. And since she's from Canada, she's using the Canada specific idioms and items, that I needed to stop and look up! Things like "windbelt" (wind break formed by trees) and the Arcadian church.
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I'm willing to send these books to anyone who wants to read them. They're all on the CBC lists:
- The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence
- Fifth Business by Robertson Davies
- Paper Shadows by Wayson Choy
- Bone and Bread by Saleema Nawaz
- Flashforward by Robert Sawyer

Send me a PM if you're interested, but please do so within the next week or so, as I'll probably release them as part of gypsysmom's Canada Days challenge if they're not spoken for.

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This is the American version, generously sent me by mathgirl40, under the title "The Secret Fruit of Peter Paddington." Here's my journal entry: http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/14418700. I plan to release it today during the Twin Cities Pride Festival, at a casual restaurant in a neighborhood with a lot of very receptive potential readers.

Now that I'm in double digits of the CBC's 100 books lists, can I assume I'm on the path to qualifying as a landed immigrant? I'll just sit back and sip my Molson's, and wait for the paperwork to arrive. :-)
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This is the American version, generously sent me by mathgirl40, under the title "The Secret Fruit of Peter Paddington." Here's my journal entry: http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/14418700. I plan to release it today during the Twin Cities Pride Festival, at a casual restaurant in a neighborhood with a lot of very receptive potential readers.

Now that I'm in double digits of the CBC's 100 books lists, can I assume I'm on the path to qualifying as a landed immigrant? I'll just sit back and sip my Molson's, and wait for the paperwork to arrive. :-)


A very appropriate release date, JudySlump612! With all the Canadian reading you've been doing, you definitely qualify as an honorary Canadian. :)


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