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2016-2017 Canadian Reading Challenge

I ran one of these in 2013-2014 ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/487646 ) and I think it's about time for me to try it again...anyone care to join me?

This is a CANADIAN Provinces + Territories reading challenge for 2016-2017: read at least one book from each of Canada's provinces and territories over the course of the challenge. As a non-Canadian, I found this quite challenging last time, so I'm making it a two-year challenge to make it a bit easier.

Everyone welcome: join in at any time.

The books should be SET primarily in a specific province/territory, but they don't have to stay there for the entire book. It doesn't matter where the author is from.

BookCrossing books, library books, unregistered books from your permanent collection, books borrowed from a friend, audiobooks, e-books, children's books, graphic novels, fiction, non-fiction (including travel guides)...they'll all count.

Post here whenever you finish a book for a province or territory and let us know a little about it: what was it about, and what did you think?

Provinces (10)

▪ Alberta (AB)
▪ British Columbia (BC)
▪ Manitoba (MB)
▪ New Brunswick (NB)
▪ Newfoundland and Labrador (NL)
▪ Nova Scotia (NS)
▪ Ontario (ON)
▪ Prince Edward Island (PE)
▪ Quebec (QC)
▪ Saskatchewan (SK)

Territories (3)

▫ Northwest Territories (NT)
▫ Yukon (YT)
▫ Nunavut (NU)

~~~~~

Also...don't forget to participate in gypsysmom's mid-year Canada Days release challenge, which can be very helpful for book suggestions and resource links! (Although not all the books are _set_ in Canada.)

◦ Canada Days Challenge 2017 (sesquicentennial version): http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/539149
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2016: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/527194
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2015: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/520284
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2014: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/508645
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2013: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/495193
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2012: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/479072

Other possibly helpful links:

∙ 2017 Canada Reads books and contenders announced: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/538984

∙ The 2016 Canada Reads long list just came out: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8635901

∙ Canada Reads 2015 shortlist announced: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/516040

∙ Canada Reads 2014: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/502888

∙ 100 Books That Make You Proud to be Canadian: forum link - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/515669 (Direct link here: http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100.html )

∙ The 49th Shelf: in particular, their book map looks promising. http://49thshelf.com/---/map

∙ The Globe Books 100: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/---/article15566945

~~~~~

AND - hopefully lauraloo29 (2016 winner) will host a Canadian Literature sweepstakes in 2017, so you might want to join that. Here's a link to the 2016 sweeps - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/530888 - I was the lucky decoy. :)

(Sadly the labels are difficult to order now, but I'm hoping that will change soonish.) There are some links to Canada-themed labels in the 2015 thread: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/519419

Complete Thread

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I ran one of these in 2013-2014 ( http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/487646 ) and I think it's about time for me to try it again...anyone care to join me?

This is a CANADIAN Provinces + Territories reading challenge for 2016-2017: read at least one book from each of Canada's provinces and territories over the course of the challenge. As a non-Canadian, I found this quite challenging last time, so I'm making it a two-year challenge to make it a bit easier.

Everyone welcome: join in at any time.

The books should be SET primarily in a specific province/territory, but they don't have to stay there for the entire book. It doesn't matter where the author is from.

BookCrossing books, library books, unregistered books from your permanent collection, books borrowed from a friend, audiobooks, e-books, children's books, graphic novels, fiction, non-fiction (including travel guides)...they'll all count.

Post here whenever you finish a book for a province or territory and let us know a little about it: what was it about, and what did you think?

Provinces (10)

▪ Alberta (AB)
▪ British Columbia (BC)
▪ Manitoba (MB)
▪ New Brunswick (NB)
▪ Newfoundland and Labrador (NL)
▪ Nova Scotia (NS)
▪ Ontario (ON)
▪ Prince Edward Island (PE)
▪ Quebec (QC)
▪ Saskatchewan (SK)

Territories (3)

▫ Northwest Territories (NT)
▫ Yukon (YT)
▫ Nunavut (NU)

~~~~~

Also...don't forget to participate in gypsysmom's mid-year Canada Days release challenge, which can be very helpful for book suggestions and resource links! (Although not all the books are _set_ in Canada.)

◦ Canada Days Challenge 2017 (sesquicentennial version): http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/539149
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2016: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/527194
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2015: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/520284
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2014: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/508645
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2013: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/495193
◦ Canada Days Challenge 2012: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/479072

Other possibly helpful links:

∙ 2017 Canada Reads books and contenders announced: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/538984

∙ The 2016 Canada Reads long list just came out: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8635901

∙ Canada Reads 2015 shortlist announced: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/516040

∙ Canada Reads 2014: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/502888

∙ 100 Books That Make You Proud to be Canadian: forum link - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/515669 (Direct link here: http://www.cbc.ca/---/books100.html )

∙ The 49th Shelf: in particular, their book map looks promising. http://49thshelf.com/map

∙ The Globe Books 100: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/---/article15566945

~~~~~

AND - hopefully lauraloo29 (2016 winner) will host a Canadian Literature sweepstakes in 2017, so you might want to join that. Here's a link to the 2016 sweeps - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/530888 - I was the lucky decoy. :)

(Sadly the labels are difficult to order now, but I'm hoping that will change soonish.) There are some links to Canada-themed labels in the 2015 thread: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/519419
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I'm in! I don't remember if I succeeded last time or not, but since it's two years, it might work. I'm sure I have a few of the province settings already - now off to create a spreadsheet and match up possibilities.

(and that will give me a few for the July challenge, which I always come up short for)

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Adding - I just realized this gives me the perfect excuse to read the Anne of Green Gables series that's lurking on my ABC TBR stash :-)
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And thanks for mentioning my Canada Days release challenge.

I present a link from LibraryThing where I participate in a group that tracks Canadian books by the province or territory they are set in. The link is for my own reading since 2009 and may give you some more ideas for books set in a particular province or territory:
http://www.librarything.com/---/193959
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And thanks for mentioning my Canada Days release challenge.

I present a link from LibraryThing where I participate in a group that tracks Canadian books by the province or territory they are set in. The link is for my own reading since 2009 and may give you some more ideas for books set in a particular province or territory:
http://www.librarything.com/---/193959

Well, that sounds extremely useful..thank you! A present indeed. ;)
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And thanks for mentioning my Canada Days release challenge.

I present a link from LibraryThing where I participate in a group that tracks Canadian books by the province or territory they are set in. The link is for my own reading since 2009 and may give you some more ideas for books set in a particular province or territory:
http://www.librarything.com/---/193959


Thank you! Using librarything's places common knowledge, I was able to come up with possibilities from my current stash for Yukon, Alberta, Nova Scotia, Manitoba, PEI - and of course, Ontario was easy.

I'll keep an eye on this group for the provinces/territories that don't turn up in my 2016 reading, so I can order them from the library.

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Wow, that's a great resource, gypsysmom! I may even be able to add to it. I have some of those books from your list sitting around my house, as yet unread, and it's good to know ahead of time which province/territory they fall into.

This will be fun
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I know some of the provinces will be very easy and others might be very difficult but that's the challenge, I guess!

I love this time of year, when I can plan and prepare for next year's reading! :-)

Thanks for the links, too!
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I'll join

I haven't managed all the US states for a challenge, but I'll give it a whirl. Would the book I just happened to start (The Cruelest Month by Louise Penny) count NOW?

Now, to check out that link posted above for some ideas on what to read.
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I haven't managed all the US states for a challenge, but I'll give it a whirl. Would the book I just happened to start (The Cruelest Month by Louise Penny) count NOW?

Now, to check out that link posted above for some ideas on what to read.

Well...it's supposed to be a reading challenge, but I would normally go with when you finish it. So if you finish the book in 2016 we can say you read it in 2016. ;)
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On the other hand, having to read another Louis Penny book is hardly a BAD thing.
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I haven't managed all the US states for a challenge, but I'll give it a whirl. Would the book I just happened to start (The Cruelest Month by Louise Penny) count NOW?

Now, to check out that link posted above for some ideas on what to read.

Well...it's supposed to be a reading challenge, but I would normally go with when you finish it. So if you finish the book in 2016 we can say you read it in 2016. ;)


Fair enough, but since it is part of my SIY, I will finish it in 2015 and start afresh in 2016.
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i'M IN!

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I love reading Canadian literature, so I'm in!
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I rely on you for suggestions! :D

(Glad to see non-Canadians also, since I'm one of those..)
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I have no idea if I'll be able to complete it with books I can find here in Nepal, but the link gypsysmom provided will help and I'd like to give it a try!
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Go away!

Seriously Hyphen8, I both love you and hate your for embedding this idea into my consciousness!

I will however, recommend Heather O'Neill for a bit of Quebec gritty fiction!
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Seriously Hyphen8, I both love you and hate your for embedding this idea into my consciousness!

You're welcome. :p

I really tried to _finish_ both the 50 states and 666 challenges for 2015 (I should be on track for that) but I figured next year I'd try for something different. I really need to read the books I already have so for 2016 I'll try to see how far I can get with 666 and states with books in hand.

I'll make an exception for this Canadian challenge though, since I know I don't have many Canadian books at the moment.

I will however, recommend Heather O'Neill for a bit of Quebec gritty fiction!

I'm always happy to get recommendations, thanks. :)
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AB and NL

Just FYI: Donna Morrissey is a terrific novelist from Newfoundland. She grew up in a town of 50 - an outport town called Beaches. Sylvanus Now & Kit's Law are both set in Newfoundland, and a more recent book is set in Alberta (What They Wanted). They're all really good.
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Just FYI: Donna Morrissey is a terrific novelist from Newfoundland. She grew up in a town of 50 - an outport town called Beaches. Sylvanus Now & Kit's Law are both set in Newfoundland, and a more recent book is set in Alberta (What They Wanted). They're all really good.

Good to know, thanks.
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On the other hand, having to read another Louis Penny book is hardly a BAD thing.

That thought did cross my mind, since I read a Louise Penny book for Quebec last time and enjoyed it. At the same time, for those of us south of the 49th parallel, it's not always easy to find Canadian books, so if minesayn already has one in hand...
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On the other hand, having to read another Louis Penny book is hardly a BAD thing.

That thought did cross my mind, since I read a Louise Penny book for Quebec last time and enjoyed it. At the same time, for those of us south of the 49th parallel, it's not always easy to find Canadian books, so if minesayn already has one in hand...


And I just passed up a whole passel of Louise Penny books at yesterday's booksale. Oops.
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At the same time, for those of us south of the 49th parallel, it's not always easy to find Canadian books, so if minesayn already has one in hand...


And I just passed up a whole passel of Louise Penny books at yesterday's booksale. Oops.

Yeah, it would be so much easier if more books were like this one: https://www.flickr.com/---/datetaken-public/

;)
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On the other hand, having to read another Louis Penny book is hardly a BAD thing.

That thought did cross my mind, since I read a Louise Penny book for Quebec last time and enjoyed it. At the same time, for those of us south of the 49th parallel, it's not always easy to find Canadian books, so if minesayn already has one in hand...


Well, after having finished number 3 in the series, I need to go back and read the first two so I can understand things I missed in this one. Anyhow, if someone wants it?? PM me.
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I have quite a collection of Canadian lit. I buy almost one a month from my favorite bookstore, which happens to be in Stratford, Ontario, Canada - Fanfare Books. I'll try to create a list based on the criteria and post it here. I'd be willing to send them to non-Canadians having trouble finding books. Some of them I would want to be returned, but I am willing to lend them out.
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I'll try to create a list based on the criteria and post it here. I'd be willing to send them to non-Canadians having trouble finding books. Some of them I would want to be returned, but I am willing to lend them out.

Thank you for that generous offer!
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http://49thshelf.com

The map looks like it would be fun to play with...
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That looks like a good resource, too! Thanks!
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I don't know if I can manage the challenge, but I have enjoyed a lot of books set in Canada. While most of them are set in Quebec or Ontario provinces (including Louise Penny's "Three Pines" series, Tanya Huff's "Blood" books, and Edward O. Phillips' "Geoffry Chadwick" books), I know of some set farther afield, including:

Tanya Huff's "Smoke" books, set in Vancouver BC.

Any book about the lost Franklin expedition, from non-fiction to novels like Dan Simmons' The Terror, set mainly in what is now Nunavut.

[FWIW, there's a Wikipedia page on novels set in Canada by province/territory: https://en.wikipedia.org/---/Category:Novels_set_in_Canada_by_province_or_territory ]
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I don't know if I can manage the challenge, but I have enjoyed a lot of books set in Canada. While most of them are set in Quebec or Ontario provinces (including Louise Penny's "Three Pines" series, Tanya Huff's "Blood" books, and Edward O. Phillips' "Geoffry Chadwick" books), I know of some set farther afield, including:

Tanya Huff's "Smoke" books, set in Vancouver BC.

Any book about the lost Franklin expedition, from non-fiction to novels like Dan Simmons' The Terror, set mainly in what is now Nunavut.

Well, that would be 4 of the 13 already...and you'd have two years. :)
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Well, that would be 4 of the 13 already...and you'd have two years. :)


Yeah, but I've already read all those - would that even count? {wry grin}
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Well, that would be 4 of the 13 already...and you'd have two years. :)


Yeah, but I've already read all those - would that even count? {wry grin}

You could...but it would be sort of beside the point. Up to you. :)
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Question:

Can anyone here walk me through how to set up a spreadsheet on my computer to track the books I will read for each province and territory?

A colleague of mine once showed me how and I was very proud of myself when I remembered how to do it a few years ago when I participated in the 666 challenge. I went back to look at the spreadsheet and even printed it out, as a sample. I also googled, and have got as far as going into my Word program and following the instructions. But somehow, I can't seem to replicate what I had from the 666 chart. I remember that it was surprisingly simple to do and I think that is what is frustrating me now, the fact that I seem to be part way there but can't quite get it right or manipulate what I have.
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Do you have Excel? Spreadsheets are much easier using Excel than word.
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Well, I am not sure, to be honest. Following the instructions I found when I googled, I opened a new Word document, then clicked on the *insert* tab. From there, I went across to the *object* tab and from that, I opened *Microsoft Excel 97- 2003 Worksheet*. No idea, really, why that, specifically, but it did create a sort of spreadsheet in that Word document. But I can't seem to manipulate it the way I had done when I made the spreadsheet for my 666 challenge. And damn if I can remember how I did that!

Worst case scenario, I can always make one by hand but it bugs me that I can't repeat what I actually knew how to do on the computer. I do have a couple of friends who can probably help me but I was hoping to figure it out on my own before calling them.
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I know I had a lot of fun last time, discovering new authors.

Hope to be able to play along, again!
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http://www.cbc.ca/---/the-canada-reads-2016-longlist.html?...

I haven't read any of the yet though I will admit that I started but just couldn't get into *Sweetland* by Michael Crummey. I had heard good things about it and when I found the audiobook version at the library, I jumped at it. But I never made it through disc 1. It just never held my interest. I do want to read Lawrence Hill's newest book, though, not only because it's his, but because it seems so timely, with all the refugees in the news. I heard him discuss the book in an interview on CBC and I look forward to that one.
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http://www.cbc.ca/---/the-canada-reads-2016-longlist.html?...

I haven't read any of the yet though I will admit that I started but just couldn't get into *Sweetland* by Michael Crummey. I had heard good things about it and when I found the audiobook version at the library, I jumped at it. But I never made it through disc 1. It just never held my interest. I do want to read Lawrence Hill's newest book, though, not only because it's his, but because it seems so timely, with all the refugees in the news. I heard him discuss the book in an interview on CBC and I look forward to that one.


I have Lawrence Hill's new book; perhaps I'll begin with it. Thank you for posting this link.
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still working on the States challenge and I am trying the 666 again. Gosh I am going to be busy. Thanks for organising, I am so ignorant about Canada I was unaware of some of those territories.
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still working on the States challenge and I am trying the 666 again. gOsh I am going to be busy. Thanks for organising, I am so ignorant about Canada I was unaware of some of those territories.


Laughing! I'm juggling all 3 myself next year too. But this is a TWO year challenge, so that helps.
It does help me pay attention though. I already have 3 books set aside for different provinces that I never would have paid attention to before.
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..not sure what's next after that. :)
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Etta and Otto and Russell and James by Emma Hooper is about Etta's journey of discovery which she takes at the age of 82 by walking from her farm in Saskatchewan to the Atlantic Ocean but while she walks she remembers much of her life from the time she met her husband, Otto, and their mutual friend Russell. So much is about being a schoolteacher in a one-room school on the prairies and then going to work in a munitions factory during WWII that I decided it fits into Saskatchewan. And it's a damn good book too.
http://www.librarything.com/---/122828495
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I lucked into a romance by Zoe York that happens to be set in Ontario. So one province down, and quite a few to go.
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Ru by Kim Thuy (Quebec)

Well, perhaps this is typical for me, to be a dissenting voice, since it won last year's Canada Reads and generated a lot of buzz, but I am wondering what all the fuss is about. This isn't meant as a spoiler alert but if discussion of a book you haven't yet read is something that concerns you, then perhaps you can take it as that and read no further.

For one thing, I have to wonder why it is called a *novel*. To my mind, this is not a novel at all but rather an almost stream of consciousness collection of memories. I found it disjointed; sometimes it flowed, other times, not at all, jumping back and forth in time with no apparent consistency. It was a quick enough read, though, with its format of very short pages (sometimes, only one paragraph per page), and no chapters. I am not a fan of short stories, as a rule, so maybe that also had something to do with why I don't agree with it being called a novel. There wasn't really a beginning, middle and end. There were times I did find the language to be lovely but in truth, most often, it just felt more like a running commentary of her memories of her homeland and her family. Oh well. Different strokes for different folks, I guess,

My Ontario book was a memoir by Walter Gretzky, Wayne's dad, called On Family, Hockey and Healing, which he wrote 10 years after suffering a debilitating stroke. It was a much better read than I expected it to be, which is always a nice surprise. So I guess I have covered Ontario and Quebec, though I have so many other books from these 2 provinces alone! Time to travel a bit further afield!
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Ru by Kim Thuy (Quebec)

Well, perhaps this is typical for me, to be a dissenting voice, since it won last year's Canada Reads and generated a lot of buzz, but I am wondering what all the fuss is about. This isn't meant as a spoiler alert but if discussion of a book you haven't yet read is something that concerns you, then perhaps you can take it as that and read no further.

For one thing, I have to wonder why it is called a *novel*. To my mind, this is not a novel at all but rather an almost stream of consciousness collection of memories. I found it disjointed; sometimes it flowed, other times, not at all, jumping back and forth in time with no apparent consistency. It was a quick enough read, though, with its format of very short pages (sometimes, only one paragraph per page), and no chapters. I am not a fan of short stories, as a rule, so maybe that also had something to do with why I don't agree with it being called a novel. There wasn't really a beginning, middle and end. There were times I did find the language to be lovely but in truth, most often, it just felt more like a running commentary of her memories of her homeland and her family. Oh well. Different strokes for different folks, I guess,

I agree with you jessibud. An interview I saw of her when the book was nominated for the Giller rather explains the format I think. She said she would write anywhere she happened to be even waiting at a red light. (Having driven in Montreal traffic this summer I can understand that might give you more time to write than in Winnipeg but still ...)
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Unless by Carol Shields
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13806733/

I've read several novels by Carol Shields previously (and have a few more on hand) but this is probably my least favorite to date. The eldest daughter of Reta Winters has dropped out of college and become a panhandler on the streets of downtown Toronto. Communicating only with a sign around her neck with the word "Goodness", the daughter refuses any other acknowledgement with the world or her family. Reta deals with the situation by working on her new novel and dealings with her family and friends.

Hoping to get a few more Canadian authors read prior to the Canada Day release challenge.
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with this classic tale:
Anne of GREEN Gables by L.M.Montgomery http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/3890147

A childhood reread for me about an orphan girl adopted by a brother/sister in the early 1900s.
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I apologize for not sharing my Canadian holdings yet; I am currently weeding out my library and working on compiling the list.

The first two books I thought I'd read for this challenge are by Canadians but do not take place in Canada. Oh well...I wanted you to know I am still participating and will try to post the books I will loan out by the end of February.
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Manitoba Larry's Party by Carol Shields BCID xxx 13832482

Larry is so ordinary, then he becomes a Maze designer. Along the way two marriages and a child. A health scare and then the party. We are not sure how this ends but there are clues.
Each chapter is a year in the life of Larry with a few skips, he goes from late tens to almost 50. I enjoyed this, but found the last chapter dialogue chaotic and annoying ( which I suspect is how Larry felt)

Manitoba,
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Still Life by Louise Penny
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13842613/

Chief Inspector Armand Gamache is called to investigate a suspicious death in rural Three Pines, south of Montreal. An elderly woman has been found who may or may not have been the victim of a hunting accident, but it becomes increasingly clear to almost everyone that a local resident is probably responsible.

I really had a hard time putting this book down - I loved the characters of the Three Pines.
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Still Life by Louise Penny
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13842613/

I really had a hard time putting this book down - I loved the characters of the Three Pines.

Welcome to the club. My book club decided to read Still Life a couple of years ago. Since then I have read all of them except the last one but I have it. I think we all wish Three Pines was real so we could go and sit in the bistro and visit the stores and watch the people come and go. Mind you they do seem to have a high incidence of murders for such a small community.
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The Republic of Love by Carol Shields
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13854533/

In Winnipeg, Fay McLeod and Tom Avery, both with numerous failed relationships between them, meet, fall in love, and wonder if this time "this is it".

It wasn't until the last third of the book that things got interesting for me and then - it wasn't. I thought of not finishing it but it is Valentine's Day and wanted so much for them.
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#1 Quebec

"Bottle Rocket Hearts" by Zoe Whittall
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13842690

MY REVIEW:
Let me start this review by stating that I am a huge Heather O'Neill fan, and to anyone who has read this and even slightly enjoyed it, you need to read O'Neill's books.
This book offers all the promise of a good author. But it did scream "debut". It'll be interesting to read more recent works by Zoe Whittall.
Set in the backdrop of Montreal, with all the seediness of the gay scene, this book paints a very vivid and bleak portrait of a young girl coming of age.
The characters are nicely developed and the bleak turns the story takes keep you engaged throughout.
A promising debut from a promising author whom I believe has more to offer
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Didn't expect one so quick for this province. But a library book fit the bill!

Klondike Wedding by Kate Bridges https://www.librarything.com/---/reviews

I didn't think I had read this before, but I suspect this is a republished title, as the story seemed familiar.

Genevieve heads out to Dawson to meet up with an acquaintance, but he's out digging gold. So she marries by proxy, but when the judge drops dead after the ceremony with the wrong names on the marriage certificate, she find herself married instead to the Mountie.
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A Recipe for Bees by Gail Anderson-Dargatz
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11178313/

While Augusta Olsen awaits word on the outcome of her son-in-law's operation, she reminisces on her life: her parents, growing up on a remote farm, her marriage and life with a distant-seeming husband, her child conceived in an affair, and her gift of seeing events in the future.

This was just okay for me, and I really think I would have enjoyed it more had there not been so much going backwards and forwards in time throughout the book.
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If you do e-books, these are generally a pretty good deal, and if you're interested in Canadian writers, it's definitely worth a look.

https://storybundle.com/aurora

Since these are e-books, they won't help out with any Can Lit sweeps or gypsysmom's Canada Days challenge...and they're "speculative fiction" so the settings might not be helpful for *this* challenge..but I thought I'd mention it anyway. There are some good names in there.
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waterfalling posted a little while ago about reading the first one, Still Life, and now I have read the eleventh in the series, The Nature of the Beast:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13724793

I highly recommend that people read this series in order. Louise Penny does not rehash plots from previous books like some other writers do and you will miss a lot of the references about characters and relationships if you don't read them sequentially.
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I knew the book was in Western Canada, but didn't know exactly where until I read it

I Am Hutterite by Mary Ann Kirby https://www.librarything.com/---/reviews
Kindle book. The author describes her childhood being raised on a communal farm colony in the Hutterite religion/tradition. The religion is like the Amish that I'm familiar with - and no surprise - it springs from Anabaptist roots. But unlike the Amish and Mennonites, it's a communal life - all is shared - food, chores, money, etc. Not sure I could live like that.
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I, on the other hand, am failing miserably at the moment. I must at least dig out that Louise Penny so when I'm done I'll have *ONE* Canadian book read for the year...
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And you can't get much more Ontarioan than Alice Munro. The View from Castle Rock is about Munro's family, the Laidlaws, who moved from Scotland to Canada and finally settled in Huron County in Ontario:
http://www.librarything.com/---/127159739
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And you can't get much more Ontarioan than Alice Munro.


I didn't know that. I think I have at least one book by her.
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Canada by Richard Ford
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14080170/

Fifteen-year-old Dell Parsons' life in Montana is shattered when his parents commit a bank robbery in North Dakota and are arrested. His twin sister runs away to California, and Dell is spirited away to a small town in Saskatchewan to the care of Arthur Remlinger, an American fugitive with a dark past.

Well-written story with a lot of foreboding.
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The Bishop's Man by Linden MacIntyre is set on Cape Breton Island which is where MacIntyre grew up and has set his other books.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13094512

This book is on the CBC list of 100 Books that Make you Proud to be Canadian and it certainly deserves to be. I highly recommend it.
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The Engagement by Kate Bridges http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/13877149

Another Mountie book that I picked up purely because it matched this month's ultimate challenge and Plum's reading challenge. And on page 1, I realized it was also good for this challenge!

late 1800's Calgary, near the Mountie's fort. Virginia travels West to learn medicine from her uncle and to marry Zack, a Mountie. But when a desperado tries to kill him...and her...he banishes her to the Fort and calls off the wedding, much to her fury.
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I found this great graphic novel about living in Yellowknife called Ramshackle: A Yellowknife Story by Alison McCreesh:
http://www.librarything.com/---/130850854

She makes living in a shack with no indoor plumbing sound romantic!
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I found this great graphic novel about living in Yellowknife called Ramshackle: A Yellowknife Story by Alison McCreesh:
http://www.librarything.com/---/130850854

She makes living in a shack with no indoor plumbing sound romantic!

Sounds like a good one: I'll have to keep an eye out for it.
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I found this great graphic novel about living in Yellowknife called Ramshackle: A Yellowknife Story by Alison McCreesh:
http://www.librarything.com/---/130850854

She makes living in a shack with no indoor plumbing sound romantic!

Sounds like a good one: I'll have to keep an eye out for it.

Yay, found a copy on my trip to NYC!
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I found this great graphic novel about living in Yellowknife called Ramshackle: A Yellowknife Story by Alison McCreesh:
http://www.librarything.com/---/130850854

She makes living in a shack with no indoor plumbing sound romantic!

Sounds like a good one: I'll have to keep an eye out for it.

Yay, found a copy on my trip to NYC!

Congratulations. Hope you enjoy it.
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FINALLY got one done. :)

1. A Gathering of Ghost Stories by Robertson Davies
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14058883

A little book - one of the Penguin 60s - which is apparently a small selection from a larger book of ghost stories all set at the university in Toronto. A light read in more than one sense. ;)
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The Bird Artist by Howard Norman
The novel begins in 1911 in the coastal town of Witless Bay, Newfoundland, with the narrator, Fabian Vas, confessing to the murder of the lighthouse keeper. Fabian tells of his life with his parents, his education and vocation as a bird artist, his relationship with a local girl and his upcoming arranged marriage to a distant cousin, and the aftermath of the murder.

Was interesting to learn that Newfoundland during this time frame was not part of Canada; hence the references to Canadian dollars and Canadian Thanksgiving.
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"Strange Heaven" by Lynn Coady
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14052006/

MY REVIEW
I "liked" this book. I think I decided a while back to get more involved in Canadian Fiction as I am a huge Heather O'Neill fan. This book from the reviews sounded like I was on the right track, but didn't come close. Maybe she's just too good and I should stop trying to find more authors like her?
Anyway, I did enjoy this novel (once I got over the comparing factor) and it contained one of my favourite themes - a slightly unhinged young main character in a psych ward! Whats not to love!?
The writing at times became what I can only describe as 'vague', and although I get that this was intentional, it really became confusing in parts.
Overall a good debut novel by an author I would look for again, but in the hope that their 2nd novel was a bit stronger.
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"Strange Heaven" by Lynn Coady
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14052006/

Overall a good debut novel by an author I would look for again, but in the hope that their 2nd novel was a bit stronger.


Try reading The Antagonist. It's the only book by Coady that I have read but I thought it was terrific.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11960048/
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Try reading The Antagonist. It's the only book by Coady that I have read but I thought it was terrific.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11960048/

Yeah that's her 4th novel. Gotta read the 2 before it first ;)
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Station Eleven Emily St John Mandel BCID xxx 14113621

This dystopian novel starts with the death of an actor on a Toronto stage. The actor has succumbed to the deadly virus that kills 99% of the worlds population. The novel flicks between the then and the now which is twenty years on. The actor and those whose lives he touched are constantly returned to. Wonderful.

Manitoba, Ontario
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I started the year with great intentions, but life got in the way. I am weeding out my library and organizing. Once the Canadian lit is organized, I know I'll finish this up fairly quickly. I am also insisting that the books be written by Canadians. I'll be back soon!
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I started the year with great intentions, but life got in the way.

I've only done two so far, so I certainly can't point fingers. :)

Once the Canadian lit is organized, I know I'll finish this up fairly quickly.

Lucky you! For me, a significant part of the challenge is *finding* books for it!

I am also insisting that the books be written by Canadians.

Whatever works for you: I'm not going to be that picky. The author of my Manitoba book doesn't seem to say which country she started off in, only that she lives in the US now.
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2. The Cage by Audrey Schulman
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14129113

The cage is meant to protect Beryl from the polar bears on the ice outside of Churchill - so she can take photos of them for a magazine. Unsurprisingly, since it's a novel, things don't go exactly as planned...

Read so far: MB + ON
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3. The Islander by Cynthia Rylant
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14215761

Daniel is an orphan living with his grandfather on a remote island in British Columbia. Daniel and his grandfather are close, but Daniel doesn't really feel connected to the other island residents. Then one day he makes a discovery at the beach which changes his life forever.

Read so far: BC + MB + ON
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I just finished reading an excellent YA book that takes place in Ontario.

Exit: Pursued By A Bear by E.K. Johnston - Highly recommend. I listened to it on Audible, and the narrator is perfect.
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I just finished reading an excellent YA book that takes place in Ontario.

Exit: Pursued By A Bear by E.K. Johnston - Highly recommend. I listened to it on Audible, and the narrator is perfect.

Always nice to get a recommendation, thanks. I do need to get something lined up for the December readathon... :)
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The Fortunate Brother by Donna Morrissey:
http://www.librarything.com/---/135782475

Morrissey is wonderful at evoking life in outport Newfoundland. If you haven't read anything by her you might want to read Sylvanus Now which is the first book of a series about the Now family. The Fortunate Brother is the third book.
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The Fortunate Brother by Donna Morrissey:
http://www.librarything.com/---/135782475

Morrissey is wonderful at evoking life in outport Newfoundland. If you haven't read anything by her you might want to read Sylvanus Now which is the first book of a series about the Now family. The Fortunate Brother is the third book.


Thank you for the recommendation!
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I made this a 2-year challenge on purpose because I figured I'd need two years. :s
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I made this a 2-year challenge on purpose because I figured I'd need two years. :s


With all the *other* challenges, I'm taking the 2 years!
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finally another one. But I've pulled a bunch on Canadian authors for the authors reading challenge, so that might help :-)

Anne of the Island by L.M.Montgomery http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7186376

Anne heads off to college in Nova Scotia, along with a few others from PEI. Some interesting terms were used - not sure if it's the times, or just a non-US one. For example, she got to college by "boat train", which apparently is a train that goes to a port. https://en.wikipedia.org/---/Boat_train
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I am starting with The Idea of Canada - Letter to a Nation by David Johnston. I am also reading it for the other Canadian lit challenge. It is non-fiction but grabbed my attention this summer when I saw it in Stratford, Ontario.
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Last evening I was mapping out my reading for the next few weeks. I'm involved in three challenges and decided to keep track of them in a small notebook.
I already reported that my book for Ontario was Exit: Pursued by a Bear by E.K. Johnston,
I'm reading The Idea of Canada by David Johnston, and my favorite indie bookstore owner sent me my Newfoundland book - The Colony of Unrequited Dreams by Wayne Johnston.

I did not plan this! I know quite a few Canadians and can't think of one whose last name is Johnston. Is it a fairly common Canadian name? Yes, I'm easily amused.
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That's a funny coincidence!

I am not familiar with the first book you mentioned but David Johnston is our current Governor General and while I have heard about the book he wrote, I have not yet read it.

However, the Wayne Johnston book is terrific. In fact, it was the very first audiobook I ever listened to, on my very first solo road trip many years ago. It may be what got me hooked on audiobooks!
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That's a funny coincidence!

I am not familiar with the first book you mentioned but David Johnston is our current Governor General and while I have heard about the book he wrote, I have not yet read it.

However, the Wayne Johnston book is terrific. In fact, it was the very first audiobook I ever listened to, on my very first solo road trip many years ago. It may be what got me hooked on audiobooks!


Glad to know you liked the Wayne Johnston book. It came highly recommended, but the length had me a bit frightened. I don't often read books of 500 pages.
And I HIGHLY recommend The Idea of Canada. When I finish reading it, I am definitely writing to Mr. Johnston. It makes me truly wish I could emigrate to Canada. I would like Donald Trump to read this book.
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" I would like Donald Trump to read this book."

Hehe, do you think Donald Trump has ever actually sat down and read a book? Any book?

I would actually be surprised if he had... ;-p

Thanks for the recommendation. I will seek out David Johnston's book
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" I would like Donald Trump to read this book."

Hehe, do you think Donald Trump has ever actually sat down and read a book? Any book?

I would actually be surprised if he had... ;-p

Thanks for the recommendation. I will seek out David Johnston's book

Laughing, I highly doubt that he has read a book...ever.
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Last evening I was mapping out my reading for the next few weeks. I'm involved in three challenges and decided to keep track of them in a small notebook.
I already reported that my book for Ontario was Exit: Pursued by a Bear by E.K. Johnston,
I'm reading The Idea of Canada by David Johnston, and my favorite indie bookstore owner sent me my Newfoundland book - The Colony of Unrequited Dreams by Wayne Johnston.

I did not plan this! I know quite a few Canadians and can't think of one whose last name is Johnston. Is it a fairly common Canadian name? Yes, I'm easily amused.

Oh, that is surprising. I'm familiar with the name, of course, but I'm not sure I've ever actually met anyone named Johnston. I guess you'd better put me down under easily amused also. :p
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Well, lots of the action takes place outside of BC but since the author is from BC and there is still quite a bit of action in BC that where I am placing Snow Job by William Deverell:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11258535
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Lost in the Barrens by Farley Mowat is over 60 years old and I know the area wasn't called Nunavut then but since it takes place in the tundra just north of the Manitoba border that is what it would be called now.
http://www.librarything.com/---/137765586
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Lost in the Barrens by Farley Mowat is over 60 years old and I know the area wasn't called Nunavut then but since it takes place in the tundra just north of the Manitoba border that is what it would be called now.
http://www.librarything.com/---/137765586

Yes, I remember going to the '86 expo in Vancouver: there wasn't a territory called Nunavut then.

Sometimes researching what a place is called *now* is tricky, but if it was limited to only books that took place in Nunavut since it's officially been a separate territory that would make the challenge even harder!
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https://thewalrus.ca/and-they-danced/

I got the eBook and its just a 35 pages, but by the link above you can just read it on the webpage.
Set in Val des Loups which I believe is fictional, but you can class it as Roussillon which is a regional county municipality in the Montérégie region of Quebec.
I do love Heather O'Neill.
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Decided to switch to a monthly check in as that is working for my other challenges.

As previously stated, I decided to read The Idea of Canada: Letters to a Nation by David Johnston. I cannot emphasize enough how much I love this book. Definitely my favorite book of the year so far. As someone who is outraged by my new president, this book has been a comfort and brought me great solace while reading it. I enjoyed that he mentions all of Canada and even recommends a few Canadian authors.

And here is the rest of my list so far:

Provinces (10)

▪ Alberta (AB)
▪ British Columbia (BC)
▪ Manitoba (MB)
▪ New Brunswick (NB)
▪ Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) - The Colony of Unrequited Dreams by Wayne Johnston (started reading it today and was sucked in on the first page. OH MY GOODNESS! Great reading)
▪ Nova Scotia (NS)
▪ Ontario (ON) - We Were Liars by E. Lockhart - YA novel and highly recommended.
▪ Prince Edward Island (PE)
▪ Quebec (QC)
▪ Saskatchewan (SK)

Territories (3)

▫ Northwest Territories (NT)
▫ Yukon (YT)
▫ Nunavut (NU)
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4. The Ballad of Jacob Peck by Debra Komar
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/14370283

Nonfiction: New Brunswick farmer Amos Babcock killed his sister while in a religious frenzy. Should the man who put him into that state have shared his guilt and his punishment?

Inspired by a John Bottomley song.

Read so far: BC + MB + NB + ON
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Someone started a strand about this with a link:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/meet-the-canada-reads-2017-contenders.html

I always check this out and think one of the books should be good for Nunavut:
"The Right to Be Cold tells the personal story of acclaimed Inuk activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier. The book explores the parallels between safeguarding the Arctic and the survival of Inuit culture.

Sheila Watt-Cloutier is one of the world's most recognized environmental, cultural and human rights activists. She was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in 2007, and has served as both Canadian president and international chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council.

Sheila Watt-Cloutier on the lifelong fight to maintain her Indigenous voice."

Wouldn't this one fit for that territory? Or would it be better for Northwest Territories?

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