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And...DONE! Now I just have to see if I can hang on to some of these books for the Canadian *release* challenge.

Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie Macdonald
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11691148

Kindly RABCK'd to me by quietorchid.

Follows the lives of a family in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia during the first half of the 20th century, with particular focus on the daughters.

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/kq6ucug

I made my (revised) goal of 13 months for 13 books and had a lot of fun along the way. For those of you who haven't finished yet, don't panic - I will keep this thread open at least through 2014. :)

As for me, I'll probably start challenging myself to read one book from every Canadian province/territory again in a year or so. :)

~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

Summary:

E-books: NT, YT, AB
Audio: PE, ON, SK, QC
Unregistered: BC
Library: NL
Registered: MB, NU, NB, NS

Alberta: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8093154
British Columbia: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7817830
Manitoba: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7991225
New Brunswick: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8146838
Newfoundland & Laborador: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8139929
Northwest Territories: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7792337
Nova Scotia: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8151125
Nunavut: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8135524
Ontario: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7838677
Prince Edward Island: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7811034
Quebec: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8119062
Saskatchewan: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8105135
Yukon: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7809919

Complete Thread

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EDIT: November 2013. Obviously I'm not going to finish this this year, and I think I'm not the only one. So I'm going to make it a 2 year challenge. :)

~~~~~

As quietorchid pointed out, I said I would start a new thread...so here it is. (The original signup thread is here - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/487156 - but you don't need to sign up there, just jump in here!)

~~~~~

Inspired by NancyNova's 50 US States + Territories challenge: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/486800

This is a CANADIAN Provinces + Territories reading challenge for 2013-14: read at least one book from each of Canada's provinces and territories over the course of the challenge.

Everyone welcome (Canadians and non-Canadians too) - join in at any time.

The books should be SET primarily in a specific province/territory, but they don't have to stay there for the entire book. It doesn't matter where the author is from.

BookCrossing books, library books, unregistered books from your permanent collection, books borrowed from a friend, audiobooks, e-books, children's books, graphic novels, fiction, non-fiction (including travel guides)...they'll all count. This will be very freeform - everyone can track their own reading on the honor system, but please post your list of books here so others can see your choices!

You can post separately for each province and territory or do one list that you update - your choice.

Ok, go!

~~~~~

Also...don't forget to participate in gypsysmom's mid-year Canada Days release challenge, which is very helpful for book suggestions and resource links!

Canada Days Challenge 2012: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/479072
Canada Days Challenge 2013: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/495193

~~~~~

People who have finished this challenge:

fracula - March 2013
gypsysmom - December 2013
hyphen8 - January 2014
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Forty Words for Sorrow by Giles Blunt
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11616250/

This is the first of his John Cardinal series set in Algonquin Bay, Ontario. It was very good, but was setting up the characters more than getting the flavor of a province. From this book, if you changed the city names, it could be in the US, set in the decaying rust belt, a minor city left behind the times. A far better book at describing the area would be Blackfly Season, here's a link http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9908562/
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Snow Man: John Hornby in the Barren Lands by Malcolm Waldren

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11617238/

Fascinating book. This is based on the letters and diaries of a man who spent a year (1924-5) living off the land in the Barrens area with John Hornby. Hornby was an eccentric, who was obsessed with getting away from civilization and seeing new areas. Togther they found the first Musk oxen seen in several decades, almost starved, and traveled from Great Slave Lake to Hudson Bay. The area is aptly named.
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Okay, I'm officially embarressed, but now Hyphen8 knows why I whined when the thread wasn't immediately posted. Ah well. This was an amazing book.

Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny. http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11632265

Set in at least 3 places simultaneously in Quebec Province (one in the past), this police proceedural/murder mystery was a wonderful book. I've been to the city of Quebec in the winter, and the descriptions are apt. I've lived in Minnesota for years, so I can only attest that the descriptions of winter in the countryside are authentic for the lattitude. (nothing is more annoying than having to read descriptions of what someone in Ohio 'thinks' a winter in the northland might sound/smell/look/feel like). Brrr. But beautiful, otherwise why would we stay here?
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Okay, I'm officially embarressed, but now Hyphen8 knows why I whined when the thread wasn't immediately posted.


I'll get there. I'm 3/4 of the way through my NWT book so you shouldn't be alone here *too* much longer. :)

After that it might take me a while to track down another one. I read good books for Newfoundland and Nova Scotia...last year. :s

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This was an amazing book.

Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny. http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11632265

Set in at least 3 places simultaneously in Quebec Province (one in the past), this police proceedural/murder mystery was a wonderful book. I've been to the city of Quebec in the winter, and the descriptions are apt. blockquote>

I'm surprised there hasn't been more mention of Louise Penny's books on this thread. Her murder mysteries set in Quebec are winning awards, reaching the top of reading lists, being translated into other languages and are now being filmed for TV. They are great reads and each is a story unto itself, but I would recommend reading them in order written, especially the last 3 or 4 as these mention characters and events in earlier books
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I'm surprised there hasn't been more mention of Louise Penny's books on this thread. Her murder mysteries set in Quebec are winning awards, reaching the top of reading lists, being translated into other languages and are now being filmed for TV. They are great reads and each is a story unto itself, but I would recommend reading them in order written, especially the last 3 or 4 as these mention characters and events in earlier books


I just picked up her first book, Still Life, this weekend. I'm ashamed I haven't read her books before but better late than never. I talked my work book club into reading Still Life for April 2013 so I knew I would have to start the series. I'm sure once I'm started I'll be looking for the other ones.
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Yellowknife by Steve Zipp
ISBN 978-0-9736321-1-8
Available through the publisher: http://www.restelluris.ca (buy the book or download the PDF for free)

The only e-readers I have are my computer and an iPod, so the PDF was a bit tricky to read, but if you have a tablet-size reader it should be fine.

Honestly, I picked this because I needed a book for NWT and could easily get a copy...but I definitely enjoyed this quirky book. There are some nice phrases, a number of amusing factoids (although some of the ones about mosquitoes I didn't want to know), and a lot of memorable and very individual characters (not to mention seriously cold weather). The story gets stranger as it goes; not all the storylines get tied up at the end and not all the questions are answered, but sometimes that's the way it goes. Besides, I get the impression that in that part of the world sometimes the questions just don't get answered.

John Hornby (see quietorchid's NWT post) makes a brief appearance, sort of.

Here's a good review by someone else: http://www.bellasbookshelves.com/?...

Progress map at http://douweosinga.com/projects:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/acxd7r6
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Healthy, Wealthy and Dead by Suzanne North is a mystery set in and near Calgary:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11197082
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Ha ha, I just finished this wonderful book today, set in Manitoba. It was my prize for the most released books in the 2012 Canadian Book Release challenge, and sent to me from gypsymom!

The Setting Lake Sun by J.R. Léveillé:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11296753

"This is the story of Angele, a young Metis woman, and Ueno Takami, a Japanese man. Angele and Ueno meet at a gallery opening in Winnipeg and from the beginning Angele is entranced by Ueno. She learns that the print shop where her friend works is going to print a book of Ueno's poetry and woodcuts. She arranges her schedule so that she can go to the printery when the book is being printed. Ueno is delighted to see her and he asks her to translate his poems into French. Then Ueno invites Angele to his cabin on Setting Lake which is near Thompson. Angele and Ueno become lovers and soulmates."
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Ha ha, I just finished this wonderful book today, set in Manitoba. It was my prize for the most released books in the 2012 Canadian Book Release challenge, and sent to me from gypsymom!

The Setting Lake Sun by J.R. Léveillé:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11296753



I'm so glad you liked the book. And I thought the design of the book was lovely too. This is a true example of why I will never give up reading real books; I love the experience of holding a book in my hand and examining the cover etc. too much.
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This book came to me as the winner of the 2011 Canadian Literature Sweepstakes. Just finished this on January 8th. Wonderful and funny little book, sent to me from loveamystery, Vancouver.

Fishing Up the Moon by Anne Hines:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/3935563

"Trying without success to manage a series of argumentative inner voices, a young Toronto secretary is suddenly catapulted out of her safe existence into hilarious adventure on Cape Breton Island. A humourous and touching tale, this book is a tribute to the unconquerable spirit of the people of Cape Breton Island, and to the voices of reason within each of us."
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The Age of Hope by David Bergen is set in my home province so there were lots of familiar places.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11631664

I wish I could say I loved this book but it just didn't grab me. It is essentially the story of one woman from her youth to her 70s. We learn about what happened to her but I never felt I knew what she was feeling.
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Love Song for a Raven by Elizabeth Lowell http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10058535/

The Island name got me, so I had to look it up to see if they were real - and they are. They're now renamed Haida Gwaii and really are populated with the Raven clan - and they really are a maritime type of culture. Sometimes romances aren't just that - you can learn something {grin}.
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Love Song for a Raven by Elizabeth Lowell http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10058535/

The Island name got me, so I had to look it up to see if they were real - and they are. They're now renamed Haida Gwaii and really are populated with the Raven clan - and they really are a maritime type of culture. Sometimes romances aren't just that - you can learn something {grin}.


Interesting. I wouldn't have thought of the Haida Gwaii as a setting for a romance novel. I've never been to the Haida Gwaii but I would love to go sometime. Famed painter, Emily Carr, spent a lot of time in the Queen Charlottes:
http://www.museevirtuel-virtualmuseum.ca/---/index.php
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This book is going to quietorchid who will send it to NancyNova afterwards.

~~~

Sorry, I know this is a Canadian reading challenge and a book about Canada, but it's a hardcover weighing about a pound and a half, and that's a big bite for postage. So I'm offering it to US participants in this challenge first. I'll give it a week, then if none of them wants it, I'll consider sending it to one of the Canadians. :)

Last Man Out: The Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster (non-fiction)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11570553

I read this in 2012, so I can't count it for this challenge, but one of you could; if you're interested, post here and send me a PM. Media mail will take about 3 weeks.
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Sorry, I know this is a Canadian reading challenge and a book about Canada, but it's a hardcover weighing about a pound and a half, and that's a big bite for postage. So I'm offering it to US participants in this challenge first. I'll give it a week, then if none of them wants it, I'll consider sending it to one of the Canadians. :)

Last Man Out: The Story of the Springhill Mine Disaster (non-fiction)
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11570553

I read this in 2012, so I can't count it for this challenge, but one of you could; if you're interested, post here and send me a PM. Media mail will take about 3 weeks.


I'd love it! and would be happy to send it media mail to anyone else in the US after I read it. Will pm you.
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Got the book! I pm'ed NancyNova for her address.
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Hmm. As my husband said 'gee, tell me what you REALLY think about this.'
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11570553

I'll be interested on other's takes on this depiction of the Springhill Mine Disaster. I think there is still a book to be written on it, but this wasn't it. It was interesting to read it in the wake of finishing Fall on your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11691148 as that is set in a Cape Breton mining town during the 1920s. Oh well, I guess I just got a little infuriated about the hidden subtext in the Mine book. I'll send it on the Nancynova.

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3/13 Ontario

Well, Upper Canada, which would become Ontario!

On the Head of a Pin by Janet Kellough
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8651873

The death of a son or daughter is capable of producing emotional devastation from which it is nearly impossible to recover. For Thaddeus Lewis, a preacher who travels throughout Upper Canada in the late 1830s, the loss of his daughter Sarah, “a sweet seventeen year old, with a laughing, teasing manner that made the most somber of people brighten,” is a staggering blow.

The “strange marks on her neck” are a clear sign of strangulation, but a coroner’s inquest blithely declares that Sarah died of natural causes. As Lewis discovers during his travels, spreading his brand of Christian charity to fledgling communities struggling in the wake of the 1837 Upper Canada Rebellion, Sarah is only the first of several girls to be murdered, and the task of catching the killer falls to him. It is a job that tests his faith, forces him to admit serious misjudgment of character, and compels him to come to terms with “the badness [that] is always there, in everybody.”

-------------------------
This book was given to me as the winner of the 2011 International Canadian Literature Sweeps, so it was past time to get to the top of Mnt. TBR!
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Darkness at the Stroke of Noon by Dennis Richard Murphy
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11646795

A murder mystery set at an archaeological camp at Victory Point, King William Island in Nunavut, where escalating violence occurs over a journal from the doomed Franklin Expedition, circa 1847-48. The struggle for survival in the harsh climate and rugged landscape of the area, is central to the story, and the historical reference to the Franklin Expedition highlights the fortitude and hardship suffered by early explorers.
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Sounds like an interesting one...I'll add it to my "things to look for" list since I haven't found a book for Nunavut yet.

Currently reading my book for Yukon. :)
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Darkness at the Stroke of Noon by Dennis Richard Murphy
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11646795

A murder mystery set at an archaeological camp at Victory Point, King William Island in Nunavut, where escalating violence occurs over a journal from the doomed Franklin Expedition, circa 1847-48. The struggle for survival in the harsh climate and rugged landscape of the area, is central to the story, and the historical reference to the Franklin Expedition highlights the fortitude and hardship suffered by early explorers.


Good choice. I read that a year or so ago and enjoyed it. If I'm correct in my recollection the author died having written only that one book. That's a pity.
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Cool Water by Dianne Warren was sent to me by kally93 for the 2011 International Canada Literature Sweepstakes

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9797821

"Juliet, Saskatchewan, is a blink-of-an-eye kind of town -- the welcome sign announces a population of 1,011 people -- and it's easy to imagine that nothing happens on its hot and dusty streets. Situated on the edge of the Little Snake sand hills, Juliet and its inhabitants are caught in limbo between a century -- old promise of prosperity and whatever lies ahead. But the heart of the town beats in the rich and overlapping stories of its people: the foundling who now owns the farm his adoptive family left him; the pregnant teenager and her mother, planning a fairytale wedding; a shy couple, well beyond middle age, struggling with the recognition of their feelings for one another; a camel named Antoinette; and the ubiquitous wind and sand that forever shift the landscape. Their stories bring the prairie desert and the town of Juliet to vivid and enduring life. This wonderfully entertaining, witty and deeply felt novel brims with forgiveness as its flawed people stumble towards the future."
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The Garneau Block by Todd Babiak
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11666997

As a Calgarian, I may be run out of town by recommending a book set in Edmonton, Calgary's friendly (and sometimes not-so-friendly) rival city in the province of Alberta. This funny, satirical novel is filled with quirky characters, and I found the fast-paced story hard to put down. After reading the book I discovered the reason for the 95 very short chapters in the book; the book was serialized in the local paper, The Edmonton Journal. I can imagine the anticipation of the readers waiting for each chapter. I wish more papers would offer a book similarly - and boost their paper sales!
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After reading the book I discovered the reason for the 95 very short chapters in the book; the book was serialized in the local paper, The Edmonton Journal. I can imagine the anticipation of the readers waiting for each chapter. I wish more papers would offer a book similarly - and boost their paper sales!


It worked for Charles Dickens. ;)

Fun to know that it's being done today.
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The Garneau Block by Todd Babiak
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11666997



I've heard of this book for a few years but didn't know it was set in Edmonton. For some reason I thought it was Ottawa--it just sounds like a federal office building (LOL). I talked my book club into choosing it for May just based upon the fact that there is a Book Club Kit for it so we don't have to scramble to get books in time. Sounds like it should be a good read.
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I talked my book club into choosing it for May


I'll be interested to know what you and your book club thought of it. I hope you like it. :)
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The Sea Captain's Wife by Beth Powning
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8354504

A gripping novel of love and obsession set in the 1860s,The Sea Captain's Wife masterfully combines truths of the heart with the sweep of adventure and takes us on an unforgettable voyage amidst breathtaking beauty. Azuba Galloway, daughter of a shipwright, sees ships leaving for foreign ports from her bustling town on the Bay of Fundy and dreams of seeing the world. When she marries Nathaniel Bradstock, a veteran sea captain, she believes she will sail at his side. But when she becomes pregnant she is forced to stay behind. Her father has built the couple a gabled house overlooking the bay, but the gift cannot shelter her from the loneliness of living without her husband. When Azuba becomes embroiled in scandal, Nathaniel is forced to take her and their daughter, Carrie, aboard his ship. They set sail for London with bitter hearts. Their voyage is ill-fated, beset with ferocious storms and unforeseen obstacles that test Azuba's compassion, courage, and love. Alone in a male world, surrounded by the splendour and the terror of the open seas, she must face her fears and fight to keep her family together.
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West Wind, North Chatter by Deanna Kent-McDonald
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11668416

Pouring all your savings into opening the first internet café in Grande Prairie may seem like a risky venture, but to Emily Reeves it is the perfect way to start anew. Emily’s life is in turmoil. Devastated by a miscarriage and the failure of her marriage, she follows her dream of opening the hip coffee shop Bean There, a place where "transplants" like her, living in the oil-rig town, can find community.
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A Daughter of the Snows by Jack London
Free e-book download from Project Gutenberg
http://www.gutenberg.org/---/14654

A tale from the days of the gold rush. Apparently this was London's first novel, and it was a commercial failure because his publisher hated it - most likely due to the strong-willed, outspoken, educated and independent female protagonist. A bit heavy on the natural superiority of the Teuton, but overall a rousing adventure, complete with a love triangle and a murder trial.

Progress map at http://douweosinga.com/projects:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/bzrdle3
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The Story Girl by Lucy Maud Montgomery
Free volunteer-read audiobook from Librivox
http://librivox.org/the-story-girl-by-lucy-maud-montgomery/

I released a copy of this for gypsymom's challenge last year but didn't have a chance to read it first, so I decided to listen to it this year! This is the first book I've read by this author that had a male protagonist (even if he is named Beverly!) so that was something different. The two boys from Toronto enjoy their time with their relatives, and I enjoyed listening to their adventures.

Progress map at http://douweosinga.com/projects:
http://tinyurl.com/akrrsde
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I read Away by Jane Urquhart because it is one of the nominated books for Canada Reads.
Although it starts in Ireland it definitely is a Canadian and Ontarioan book. Who else but an Irishman would try to farm on the Canadian Shield? Or float a house down Lake Ontario? There's also lots of Canadian history in the form of Fenian raids and the assassination of D'Arcy McGee. Something for everyone you would think but it didn't grab me as much as some other books by Urquhart have. Here's my LibraryThing review:
http://www.librarything.com/---/93296943
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Latitude of Melt by Joan Clark
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10179362

This bountiful, magical novel opens with the discovery by two fishermen of a baby floating in a cradle on an ice pan in the North Atlantic off the coast of Newfoundland in 1912. To the small fishing community into which the foundling is adopted, Aurora, as they name her – with her shock of white hair, one blue eye and one brown – is clearly enchanted. But it is not until Aurora is herself an old woman that she learns the heart-wrenching story behind her miraculous survival on the ice.
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Obasan by Joy Kogawa
unregistered/permanent collection

Although the story starts in Alberta, most of it takes place in Vancouver & Slocan so I'm counting it for BC.

This one has been sitting on my shelf for years (with the US interment books) waiting to be read so I'm glad this challenge finally made me get around to it. I'd known that Japanese Canadians were interned during WWII, but it was interesting to see how different their experiences were than those of the Japanese Americans. In particular, I was struck by the government confiscation of property, and the post-war restrictions.

Mom will read this before it goes back on my (physical) shelf.

Progress map at http://douweosinga.com/projects:
http://tinyurl.com/a3vt5aj

Judging by the map, I'd better start working my way East! (Especially since PEI is so small you can hardly see it at this scale.)
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Hyphen8, if you want another book on this topic, I can recommend Frances Itani's *Requiem*. I just recently finished listening to it on audiobook and it was excellent. Her writing is beautiful. I borrowed it from the library; if it had been my own, I'd have been happy to send it to you. But seek it out. Itani is a wonderful writer and gives a different voice to the topic of Japanese internment in Canada at that time
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Thanks for the recommendation: I'll definitely look for Itani's book. Her _Deafness_ looks interesting too.
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I had a copy once but I think I released it already.
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Oops, yes, I should have said "Deafening", thanks. :)

One more for me to look for.
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February by Lisa Moore
http://www.librarything.com/---/93296915

This is a beautifully written and thought provoking book about how a woman copes with the loss of a spouse who went down on the Ocean Ranger. My biggest complaint about the book is how it jumps from one time to another, sometimes without a discernible reason. Since I have now read all of the Canada Reads books I can say that I am sticking with my initial pick of Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese but this book would be in second place.
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Fall on your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11691148

Powerful book. I highly recomend it. Set in Cape Breton, there was a lot on the mining troubles and prohibition of the earlt 20th century. Well worth reading.
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8/13 Nunavut

The Gift of the Inuksuk by Mike Ulmer
Libary book and Amazon entry: http://www.amazon.ca/---/ref=sr_1_1?...

Unique and as beautiful as a snowflake or footprint, an Inuksut (inNUKshuk,) is one of the stone figures that can be seen dotting the Canadian Artic region. Many made by ancient hands, the Inuksuit (inNUKsweet) purposes are varied, from earthly uses such as navigation and message centers to those of the spirit, as sites of reverence. Author Mike Ulmer explores the connectedness of all Artic life in his tale, The Gift of the Inuksuk.
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The Gift of the Inuksuk by Mike Ulmer
Libary book and Amazon entry: http://www.amazon.ca/---/ref=sr_1_1?...

Unique and as beautiful as a snowflake or footprint, an Inuksut (inNUKshuk,) is one of the stone figures that can be seen dotting the Canadian Artic region. Many made by ancient hands, the Inuksuit (inNUKsweet) purposes are varied, from earthly uses such as navigation and message centers to those of the spirit, as sites of reverence. Author Mike Ulmer explores the connectedness of all Artic life in his tale, The Gift of the Inuksuk.


Wow, 8 already? Go fracula!

I remember these from the Winter Olympics...although since I only heard it on TV I didn't know the word was spelled "Inuksut". :)

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Dead of Winter by Peter Kirby.
Paragraph books had an Evening of Murder sometime in November. Peter Kirby, Gilles Blunt and Linwood Barclay were the invited authors. I bought all three books. Not a good evening for my credit card! I am am saving the Gilles Blunt book ..I think I am in love with Mr Blunt...don't worry..I can love from a far!.
I read the Linwood Barclay book first. Mr. Barclay is a transplanted Canadian..so many of his stories take place in the United States.

Peter Kirby lives in Montreal and practices international law with one of Canada’s largest law firms.

He was born in Cork, Ireland, and grew up in Brixton, one of South London’s toughest neighbourhoods. He left school early, heading to the U.S. and eventually working as an itinerant chef. He ended up in Montreal, and attended Concordia University as a mature student, earning an Honours Degree in Economics while working as a chef by day and student by night. He then completed his law degrees at McGill while working as a breakfast chef at local hotels.

In 2012, The American Lawyer listed him as one of Canada’s leading 500 lawyers. Benchmark Litigation calls him one of Canada’s stars in international arbitration. His practice has seen him involved in post-conflict dispute settlement for the World Bank in the Balkans and litigating disputes against the U.S. government in Washington and the Egyptian government in Paris.

Until 2010, his writing career was marked by legal briefs, esoteric legal articles that cured insomnia, and sock drawers and shoe boxes filled with unfinished fiction. Then, an earlier version of The Dead of Winter was shortlisted for the Unhanged Arthur Award for Best Unpublished Manuscript by Crime Writers of Canada. He is now at work on the second book in the Luc Vanier series.



Inspector Luc Vanier is drinking his way through Christmas when he's called out to investigate the murder of five homeless people


My plans for all three books: to be released during the Canada Day Release Challenge

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Dead of Winter by Peter Kirby.
Paragraph books had an Evening of Murder sometime in November. Peter Kirby, Gilles Blunt and Linwood Barclay were the invited authors. I bought all three books. Not a good evening for my credit card!

My plans for all three books: to be released during the Canada Day Release Challenge



Wow, that sounds like a great line up of authors. I just finished reading my first Linwood Barclay book and I've read one of Giles Blunt's as well. I was able to see him a few years ago when he was here for the Thin Air festival. You might have to fight me for his affections--although I'll have to love from afar as well. Now I'll have to look out for Peter Kirby too.

And thanks for thinking of the release challenge already. I look forward to reading your release notes (as always).
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The Reluctant Detective by Finley Martin
Library book and Amazon entry:
http://www.amazon.ca/---/ref=sr_1_1?...

A young widow, orphan and mother, Wilhelmina Anne Brown is just beginning to find some stability in her new home in Prince Edward Island when she is forced to deal with the death of her beloved uncle, Bill Darby. Darby, a Charlottetown private investigator, leaves Anne and her fourteen-year-old daughter a small savings account and his business, where Anne has worked as office manager for six years. What follows is Anne's struggle to protect her family, find justice for her clients, and forge a new life for herself in this page-turning thriller.
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10/13 Yukon

The Call of the Wild by Jack London
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9968947/

Gold was found in Alaska, the rush to obtain it required a strong constitution and many dogs to do the work that horses usually did in the states. The environment bread harsh attitudes. Also in the testing of ones mettle one finds their true potential.

Buck (a dog that is half St Bernard and half Shepherd) goes through many lives, trials, and tribulations finally realizing his potential. On the way he learns many concepts from surprise, to deceit, and cunning; he also learns loyalty, devotion, and love. As he is growing he feels the call of the wild.
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The Other Side of the Bridge by Mary Lawson
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11715106

Set in the fictional town of Struan, Ontario, with the beauty and harsh climate of the lakes and forests of the Canadian Shield in Northern Ontario, the story of two brothers, Arthur and Jake, moves back and forth over the decades of Arthur's life, revealing the rivalry and animosity between the brothers.

I bought the book for the upcoming Canada Day Challenge and because I had read Crow Lake by the same author. I really enjoyed the book and could not put it down for the last third of it.
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I love Mary Lawson's books. I passed my copies on to non-Canadian friends, who have also become fans of her writing.
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11/13 Quebec

The Fat Woman Next Door Is Pregnant by Michel Tremblay
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/9700323

The Fat Woman Next Door Is Pregnant, the first volume of Michel Tremblay's immense Chroniques du plateau Mont-Royal, finds him abandoning much of the bleakness and anger that sustain his plays in favour of a more benevolent mode of storytelling. Without relinquishing his favourite themes--the social and spiritual poverty of working-class Quebec--Tremblay brings a lovingly comic approach to the inhabitants of la rue Fabre. The result is a rarity, a novel that realistically and (almost) unsentimentally portrays the family life of the working poor without drowning in misery.

Misery is, of course, everywhere on the plateau Mont-Royal. The Fat Woman Next Door Is Pregnant will be immediately recognizable to followers of Tremblay's plays, in which many of the same characters and stories appear. The women of la rue Fabre (with the exception of two prostitutes, Mercedes and Béatrice) are trapped in their marriages, families, and religion; the men (again, with the exception of the half-mad fiddler Josaphat-le-Violon and the homosexual Uncle Edouard) work at uninspiring jobs and lead uninspired lives. Children are granted a slight reprieve from this fate, but their coming adulthood is a looming menace.

There is very little plot in The Fat Woman Next Door Is Pregnant. It simply takes the community of the plateau Mont-Royal through a single eventful day, and even as it rambles from story to story it remains compulsively readable. Every character, from the tomcat Duplessis to the foul-mouthed but impeccably skilful streetcar driver Mastaï Jodoin, to the three knitting Graces on the porch next door (who are only visible to cats and crazy people), is rendered with great compassion and understanding. The remaining five volumes of the Chroniques du plateau Mont-Royal will look extremely tempting to anyone lucky enough to become involved with the tenants of la rue Fabre.
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Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake
SYNC Summer 2012 audio download

Written by an American, and not a whole lot that seemed specifically Canadian about this one (other than one crack about some of the characters being "pale even for Canadian kids" after being badly frightened), but the bulk of the action supposedly takes place in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The forthcoming sequel appears to be set there also.

~~~

Teenager Theseus Cassio Lowood is carrying on his father's family business: ridding the world of murderous ghosts. He and his mother move frequently as Cas dispatches one opponent after another. When they arrive in Thunder Bay, Anna Korlov, nicknamed "Anna Dressed in Blood", turns Cas's world upside down: he can't understand why she is so powerful and why she doesn't want to kill him.

Author's website: http://kendareblake.com/anna-dressed-in-blood.php

~~~

Progress map at http://douweosinga.com/projects:
http://tinyurl.com/aop382j

Other books read for Ontario:

Hominids - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11960438
Humans - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11983321
Hybrids - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11983235
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Turtle Valley by Gail Anderson-Dargatz
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11332133

Kat has returned with her disabled husband and young son to her family’s homestead in Turtle Valley, in British Columbia’s Shuswap-Thompson area. Fire is sweeping through the valley in a ruthless progression toward the farm and they have come to help her frail parents pack up their belongings. Kat’s mother, Beth, (the now elderly protagonist of Anderson-Dargatz’s first novel, the award-winning The Cure for Death by Lightning) is weighed down by her ailing husband, Gus, and by generations of accumulated detritus. But there is something else weighing her down, a secret she has guarded all her life. Kat is determined to get to its source before fire eats up all that is left of the family’s memories.

Kat has her own burdens. Her father is dying, and the family has chosen to keep him home as long as possible in defiance of the approaching flames. Beth is showing signs of early dementia. And her husband, Ezra, is a husk of his former self, stolen from her years ago by a stroke and now battling frightening mood swings and a trick memory. Once filled with passion and hope, their relationship has become more like that of nursemaid and invalid.
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Flight of Aquavit by Anthony Bidulka:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8487643

This delightful mystery is set in Saskatoon and stars gay PI Russell Quant. Since it takes place right before Christmas Bidulka makes you feel the cold and snow and the challenges of driving when it is storming. Very evocative of winter of the prairies. The mystery was also very well done. I had a suspicion about the bad guy but didn't know how it would play out. Also there was another sub-plot that I didn't guess as well. But the best part was the coterie of friends that surround Quant all of whom sound like people I'd like to know. Actually, the absolutely best character, was Quant's mother who is spending Christmas with her son. A typical Ukrainian baba she cooks and knits and crochets and dispenses words of wisdom. Made me miss my mom (who was not Ukrainian but had all those attributes).
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Calgary BookCrossers LOVE this series! Many of us got a chance to meet Anthony Bidulka at "When Words Collide 2012" last summer.

Anthony is as charming and funny in person as Russell Quant is in the stories!

Oh, and when asked, his own mother is just the same as the fictional one...
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Calgary BookCrossers LOVE this series! Many of us got a chance to meet Anthony Bidulka at "When Words Collide 2012" last summer.

Anthony is as charming and funny in person as Russell Quant is in the stories!

Oh, and when asked, his own mother is just the same as the fictional one...


Gee, as far as I know he hasn't been at Winnipeg's Thin Air festival. I know one of the organizers. I think I'll suggest she invite him. I sort of guessed that the mother was based on his own. She's a classic.
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Set near St. John, New Brunswick, Beth Powning's debut novel is a profound meditation on the nature of grief and memory. Kate, 52, has recently lost her husband, Tom, a painter, to a heart attack. The Hat Box Letters.

Book will be heading to Hawaii when I am finished.
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The Pale Indian by Robert Arthur Alexie
library book / Amazon review
http://www.amazon.ca/---/ref=sr_1_2?...

"A heartbreaking love story set against the beauty of the north.

In 1972, John Daniel, an eleven-year-old Blue Indian from Aberdeen in Canada's Northwest Territories, and his six-year-old sister, Eva, were brought to live with a white couple in Alberta, having been removed from their parents by the Powers that Be. John promised he'd never go back. But in October 1984, at twenty-two, he broke that promise. A job with a drilling company brought him back to the land of his people, and Tina Joseph, to whom he was deeply attracted, encouraged him to confront the sad truths of his parents' lives."

Thank you, hyphen8, for this reading challenge. I found books I would never have otherwise read. We have some amazing Canadian authors!
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Congratulations Fracula for finishing already. Your posts have been very interesting.
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Thank you for your great descriptions. Now I have more books to look for: just what I didn't need. :p
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The Wildfire Season by Andrew Pyper was fantastic:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10247064

Everything about this book, the setting, the characters, the wildfire itself was exceedingly well done. Pyper has a new book, The Demonologist, out and initially I didn't think it would be something I want to read but after seeing what a fine writer he is I'm putting a hold on it at my library!
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I have long heard good things about Louise Penny's Inspector Gamache books but since I like to start series with the beginning book I hadn't read any. Finally I gave myself an incentive to read them by suggesting Still Life, the first book in the series, to my work book club. Although I've never been to the Eastern Townships in Quebec this work seemed very familiar to me. Maybe it's because small villages are the same everywhere no matter the length of time they have been established or the language spoken in the shops. Everyone knows everyone else and there are very few secrets. It was the possibility of a secret being divulged that led to the murder in this book. It was a good read and I'll be looking for more of the Inspector Gamache books:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11258585
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Heart of Darkness the Canadian Version...a long trek in the snows of Northern Ontario.
The Tenderness of Wolves

http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11802108/
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#2 Alberta

2. The Rancher Takes a Wife by Judith Bowen http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/6366813/

I didn't realize how few Canada setting books I read until I started this challenge - and how few romances are set in Canada. I'll keep looking for other provinces.
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Montreal

Although I am not taking part in this challenge, I wanted to tell you about a very charming little book I just read and very much enjoyed. It is set in Montreal during a great Ice storm 1998 called "Fish Change Direction in Cold Weather" by Pierre Szalowski. It is about how people of a neighbourhood came closer through this storm, and they are all very strange people, and the book is totally un-ashamed of happy endings.
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I've really enjoyed reading through it, and everyone's reviews. I'll try to participate as much as I can find books for, I'll be on the lookout!
I just finished The Blind Assassin (set in Ontario); I'm a bit behind everyone in reading this one, I'm sure.
My review is here:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11385059

Thanks to Hyphen8's kind link, I have also downloaded the pdf of Yellowknife, so there's another one I can read. I don't normally read e-books, but make an exception for things I can't get ahold of any other way.
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I am currently listening to a very good audiobook that would fit well here. See my May Audiobook thread for more details.

The book is called Bride of New France by Suzanne Desrochers and is read wonderfully by Emma Bering
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The Curse of the Viking Grave by Farley Mowat http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10138892

I often haven't read a lot of literature by iconic authors such as Mowat, Atwood or Davies because of their reputation or because you should, like taking your vitamins. Somehow having to read these authors for school makes me less likely to read their work afterwards. I did pick this book up at a meetup and enjoyed the descriptions of northern Manitoba and its native peoples.
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Star of the Storm by Joan Hiatt Harlow
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11922987

Desperate to get at least one more province in, so I read this okay children's book. The author's mother grew up in Newfoundland, so she grew up with romantic stories of this lost eden. Here is one, Sirius the Newfie is outlawed by the mean rich man in town, Sirius' owner is heartbroken and hides the dog. Mean rich guys' daughter is coming for a visit (by steamer) and GUESS WHAT!!!! a storm. Two guesses as to who saves mean rich guy's daughter... nope, it wasn't mighty mouse.
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Recently listened to the first book of Robert Sawyer's Neanderthal Parallax and really enjoyed it.

Book 1 is Hominids: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11960438
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Graveyard of the Sea by Penny Draper
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12012295

Based on historical events along the Western Coast, tells the tale of building a coastal path between lighthouses, and the spread of the telegraph. Main character is a 12 year-old girl, and some of the 'feel' good messages get a little cloying (girls can be what they want to be, be tolerant of other cultures, etc).
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Finally adding another...

The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence - http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11964050

Hagar Shipley may be old, but she's not ready to go to a nursing home. Her conflict with her son and his wife is interspersed with Hagar's memories of the past.

Progress map at http://douweosinga.com/projects:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/kw484dn

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#8 is from Nunavut, not an common setting for a book but Frozen in Time by Owen Beattie is about the scientific search taken to find out what happened to the men on Franklin's Expedition to look for the North-West Passage. No-one from two ships ever made it back to Great Britain and it wasn't just the weather and the lack of fresh food that did them in.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5297598/
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#8 is from Nunavut, not an common setting for a book but Frozen in Time by Owen Beattie is about the scientific search taken to find out what happened to the men on Franklin's Expedition to look for the North-West Passage. No-one from two ships ever made it back to Great Britain and it wasn't just the weather and the lack of fresh food that did them in.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5297598/


Sounds like a good one; I'll add it to my list of possibilities.
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#8 is from Nunavut, not an common setting for a book but Frozen in Time by Owen Beattie is about the scientific search taken to find out what happened to the men on Franklin's Expedition to look for the North-West Passage. No-one from two ships ever made it back to Great Britain and it wasn't just the weather and the lack of fresh food that did them in.
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/5297598/

I gave this one to my father many years ago. I think it was probably the best gift I ever gave him, he loved it and raved about it for weeks.
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An Audience of Chairs by Joan Clark is set mainly on Cape Breton Island:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10243625

That's my 9th read for the challenge. I'm hoping to get to all of the remaining 3 provinces and 1 territory before the end of the year.
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An Audience of Chairs by Joan Clark is set mainly on Cape Breton Island:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/10243625

That's my 9th read for the challenge. I'm hoping to get to all of the remaining 3 provinces and 1 territory before the end of the year.


I need to do some serious work on this challenge..I'm way behind. :s

Hooray for the rest of you who keep plugging away at it!
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Body Trade by Margaret MacPherson:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11178143

It starts out in the NWT and even though it ends in Belize there are references throughout the book to the Marten Hartwell story. I remember hearing the story about a flight that crashed on its way back to Yellowknife and how the pilot was the only survivor even though the crash only killed one person immediately. The pilot and a young boy survived for some time after the crash but the young boy died of starvation shortly before rescuers found the crash site. The pilot survived because he decided to eat the flesh of one of the victims. I looked up Hartwell on Wikipedia and found out that he was a vegetarian before the crash so it must have taken a strong will to survive to eat human flesh. The article also said that Hartwell just died earlier in 2013. These types of stories always make me wonder what I would do in similar circumstances.
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I've already read one book for NWT this year, but this one does sound interesting..
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The Lucky Elephant Restaurant by Garry Ryan (read as an e-book but also available in paper format)

2007 Lambda Literary Award winner

Book 2 in a series of novels featuring Calgary's Detective Lane; this one starts with a missing child; I enjoyed this and wouldn't mind reading others in the series.

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/oeyevpn
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Bones are forever by Kathy Reichs
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12344522

Story actually goes across 3 provinces: Quebec, NWT and Alberta. I'm claiming it for Alberta as Reichs was at her most interesting when she was describing the adult entertainment section of Edmonton: "Edmonton is Canada's answer to Omaha. Solid, unassuming, and surrounded by a whole lot of nothing. It's a place that makes you think of sensible shoes." (pg 62)

Nothing against 2nd tier cities (I live in the part of the Twin Cities that is always the afterthougt) but her description of Yellowkinife could have been anywhere, so Alberta it is.
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Kill all the Lawyers by William Deverell is about lawyers from the criminal bar in Vancouver so I'm counting it for BC for this challenge:
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11258528

I still have New Brunswick and PEI to cover but I don't have any books in my TBR list from there so I'll have to see what I can find in my library. I still hope to finish this challenge in 2013.
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Deadly Appearances by Gail Bowen (unabridged audio download)
Read by Lisa Bunting

First in a series featuring Joanne Kilbourn. When political candidate and close friend Andy Boychuk is murdered, Joanne searches for answers and learns that his life was more complicated than she had ever guessed.

I have an allergy to politics in general, but this is really more about people, and Joanne's story kept me listening (even if I did guess some key plot points ahead of time). I will keep an eye out for the other books in this series.

Amongst other things, I hadn't realized that Saskatchewan had such a significant Ukrainian population...or that Regina was pronounced that way.

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/msqlebq
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I wanted to read something from PEI that wasn't written by L. M. Montgomery. I did some searching on my library's website and found Bannock, Beans and Black Tea: Memories of a Prince Edward Island Childhood in the Great Depression by John Gallant. What I didn't know at the time was that John Gallant is the father of Gregory Gallant otherwise known as Seth. Seth is a widely known illustrator and as soon as I opened this book I recognized his style.
http://www.drawnandquarterly.com/artBio.php?...

Seth encouraged his father to write down the stories he used to tell about his childhood. Then Seth combined and edited and illustrated and the result is this book.

So now I just have to find something from New Brunswick. Anyone have any suggestions of books that aren't by David Adams Richards or Beth Powning?
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I wanted to read something from PEI that wasn't written by L. M. Montgomery.


I figured I was doing well to read one of hers I hadn't read before (and one that's not from the Anne series), but it's good to see other ideas.

So now I just have to find something from New Brunswick. Anyone have any suggestions of books that aren't by David Adams Richards or Beth Powning?


Sorry, no..but those names give me a place to start looking, so thanks!
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So now I just have to find something from New Brunswick. Anyone have any suggestions of books that aren't by David Adams Richards or Beth Powning?


Sorry, no..but those names give me a place to start looking, so thanks!

You are welcome. They are both fantastic writers but Richards is pretty dark and not to everyone's taste. I found a book on another site called Summer Point by Linda McNutt and my library had a copy. I just started reading it last night but I'm so far very impressed.
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Summer Point by Linda McNutt is my New Brunswick book and the last for this challenge!
http://www.librarything.com/---/104388761

I very much enjoyed this book and I don't think I would have ever heard of it if this challenge hadn't forced me to look for something set in NB.

So thank you hyphen8 and good luck to you and the rest in finishing up in 2014.
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I think you're the second one to finish - great job!

You Canadians have an advantage over the rest of us when it comes to finding books for this challenge..but you have great suggestions, too. :D
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Still Life by Louise Penny (unabridged audio download)
Read by Ralph Cosham

Interesting and clearly set in Quebec, not some random province. One drawback to the audio (for me, anyway) is that I don't actually know how to *spell* any of the French names since I've only heard them... This is apparently the first book in the series featuring Chief Inspector Gamache; at this point I don't feel like I know very much about him. Maybe that will change if I read more books in the series.

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/k5w4op6
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Still Life by Louise Penny (unabridged audio download)
Read by Ralph Cosham

Interesting and clearly set in Quebec, not some random province. One drawback to the audio (for me, anyway) is that I don't actually know how to *spell* any of the French names since I've only heard them... This is apparently the first book in the series featuring Chief Inspector Gamache; at this point I don't feel like I know very much about him. Maybe that will change if I read more books in the series.

CBC did a made for TV movie of this book. This link should take you to the show:
http://www.cbc.ca/---/2406432208/

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The Louise Penny series set in Three Pines, Quebec definitely improves with each novel. Gamache is a fascinating man as the author develops his character more with each novel.
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Darkness at the Stroke of Noon by Dennis Richard Murphy
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12307583

Idea to read this book shamelessly stolen from this thread. :)

An enjoyable mystery..but it made me feel cold!!

Amusingly, this is only the second book on my virtual bookshelf for this challenge, which does not accurately reflect my normal reading habits (paper definitely preferred):

1 - Northwest Territories - free PDF download from author's website
2 - Yukon - Project Gutenberg free e-book
3 - Prince Edward Island - Librivox free audiobook
4 - British Columbia - unregistered book from my permanent collection
5 - Ontario - free SYNC summer download
6 - Manitoba - REGISTERED BC BOOK
7 - Alberta - Kindle e-book
8 - Saskatchewan - Audible audiobook
9 - Quebec - Audible audiobook
10 - Nunavut - REGISTERED BC BOOK

Now I just have "N"s left - New Brunswick, Newfoundland/Labrador, and Nova Scotia. I've got the books figured out, I just need to get it done. :)

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/lm27xkc
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Annabel by Kathleen Winter
Library book
Cover image here: http://preview.tinyurl.com/jvk5gop

Thanks again to gypsysmom - I was inspired to read this fascinating book by this Canada Reads thread: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/502888

The story takes place mostly in Labrador, but also in Newfoundland, so that should cover this province. :)

Talk about questions you really, really hope you'll never have to answer: what do you do if your child is born a hermaphrodite? Do you raise a boy? A girl? A little of both? When Jacinta & Treadway's baby is born in a small town in Labrador in 1968, Treadway decides that the infant will be a boy named Wayne, but Jacinta is never fully comfortable with that decision. The child Wayne is not aware of his ambiguous past, but his feminine side is never truly absent. As he grows up, he learns more about himself and tries to discover who he really is.

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/m35xb9q
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Annabel by Kathleen Winter
Library book
Cover image here: http://preview.tinyurl.com/jvk5gop

Thanks again to gypsysmom - I was inspired to read this fascinating book by this Canada Reads thread: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/502888

You are very welcome. I'm glad this book was chosen for the Canada Reads discussion as I think it deserves more attention than it got when it first was published. (But I'm still rooting for The Orenda to win.)
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The Town That Drowned by Riel Nason
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/12437229

Another interesting book that I wouldn't have discovered if I hadn't been looking for something for this challenge!

The dismantling of a small town in New Brunswick to make way for a hydroelectric dam, seen through the eyes of a teenaged girl. Absorbing even if I did see most of the major plot points coming well ahead of time. I love Percy's project. :)

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/maekep3
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And...DONE! Now I just have to see if I can hang on to some of these books for the Canadian *release* challenge.

Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie Macdonald
http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/11691148

Kindly RABCK'd to me by quietorchid.

Follows the lives of a family in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia during the first half of the 20th century, with particular focus on the daughters.

Progress map from http://douweosinga.com/projects
http://preview.tinyurl.com/kq6ucug

I made my (revised) goal of 13 months for 13 books and had a lot of fun along the way. For those of you who haven't finished yet, don't panic - I will keep this thread open at least through 2014. :)

As for me, I'll probably start challenging myself to read one book from every Canadian province/territory again in a year or so. :)

~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~

Summary:

E-books: NT, YT, AB
Audio: PE, ON, SK, QC
Unregistered: BC
Library: NL
Registered: MB, NU, NB, NS

Alberta: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8093154
British Columbia: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7817830
Manitoba: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7991225
New Brunswick: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8146838
Newfoundland & Laborador: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8139929
Northwest Territories: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7792337
Nova Scotia: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8151125
Nunavut: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8135524
Ontario: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7838677
Prince Edward Island: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7811034
Quebec: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8119062
Saskatchewan: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/8105135
Yukon: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7809919
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Congrats!!!!!!

geez, I've fallen down on the job. I have 2 or 3 provinces on my TBR pile... I got distracted by race relations in the US and....

I'm seriously on it though, I will finish! (even if I have to finbd a bunch of kid's books [sorry Gypsysmom!])
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Nice to see another person finished.

Some provinces seem to be a lot harder to find books set in them than others. I can always put my hands on books set in Ontario, Manitoba, Newfoundland, Quebec and BC. Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and the Yukon are fairly well represented in Canadian literature. Even the NWT and Nunavut have a respectable number of authors who set there books there. New Brunswick has two acclaimed contemporary writers, Beth Powning and David Adams Richards, but outside of their books it is slim pickings. However, finding something from PEI that isn't written by L. M. Montgomery is a real feat. Don't get me wrong, I love Montgomery's books but I've read everything written by her at least twice. And yet I'm sure NB and PEI have lots of fodder for writing, just as all places do. Why is it that there seem to be relatively few writers in those provinces? (The things I wonder about on a slow day!)
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Thanks.

New Brunswick has two acclaimed contemporary writers, Beth Powning and David Adams Richards, but outside of their books it is slim pickings. However, finding something from PEI that isn't written by L. M. Montgomery is a real feat. Don't get me wrong, I love Montgomery's books but I've read everything written by her at least twice. And yet I'm sure NB and PEI have lots of fodder for writing, just as all places do. Why is it that there seem to be relatively few writers in those provinces? (The things I wonder about on a slow day!)


I felt fortunate to find a NB book at all. I haven't read anywhere near all of L.M. Montgomery's books, but I'm pretty sure I haven't come across any other authors for PEI yet.

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