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Re: Reading the OED by Ammon Shea (excerpt follows)
by QueenBoadicea 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Here’s a truly funny bit under the letter G.

Excerpt:

Goat-drunk (adj.) Made lascivious by alcohol.
According to the redoubtable Thomas Nashe, the author of “The Anatomie of Absurditie”, “Christ’s Teares over Jerusalem”, and many other important works of English literature, there are eight types of drunkards, of which the one who is goat-drunk is seventh. Since the OED has seen fit to include only a few from Nashe’s list I have decided to include it in its entirety, so that you may never be at a loss for words when confronted by a drunk of any sort.

1. Ape-drunke – “he leapes, and sings, and hollowes, and daunceth for the heavens.” The kind of drunk who decides to belt out Broadway tunes and tap dance down the street.

2. Lion-drunke – “he flings the pots abut the house, calls his Hostesse whore, breakes the glasse windows with his dagger, and is apt to quarrel with any man that speaks to him.” A violent type who’ll pick a fight with a Hell’s Angel when he’s had a few; also known as “wife beater”.

3. Swine-drunke – “heavy lumpish, and sleepie, and cries for a little more drinke.” Best kind of drunk – the kind who drinks and promptly passes out.

4. Sheepe-drunke – “wise in his owne conceipt, when he cannot bring forth a right word.” A drunk who imagines himself to be Sophocles and babbles incoherently to anyone unfortunate to be in his presence.

5. Mawdlen-drunke – “when a fellowe will weepe for kindness in the midst of his Ale, and kisse you, saying; By God Captaine I love thee, goe they waies thou dost not thinke so often of me as I do of thee, I would (if it pleased GOD) I could not love thee so well as I doo, and then he puts his finger in his eie, and cries.” A weepy, pathetic sadsack who will sob over his ex-girlfriend, lost job and dead dog and declare you his best friend in the world just because you were listening to his sad tirade. The violent drunk is almost preferable to this loser.

6. Martin-drunke – “when a man is drunke and drinkes himselfe sober ere he stirre.” No clue. At a guess, I’d hazard that this is a person who drinks to forget and then forgets to stop drinking, claiming that more drink will help clear his head.

7. Goat-drunk (See above.) – The randy bastard who sees himself as a ladies’ man. In this case, it’s not “drink until they’re pretty”; it’s “drink until I’M pretty”.

8. Foxe-drunke – “when he is craftie drunke, as many of the Dutch men bee, and never bargain but when they are drunke.” I imagine this is the type of boozehound who engages in madcap, wild money-making schemes that actually seem like sensible notions. Surprisingly, a few of such schemes actually bear fruit, leading him to believe he will never have a good idea unless he’s had a snootful. See: authors, Homer Simpson.

 

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What are you reading February 17th & 18th?
by bookwormkt 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

I think I will read something alongside The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins, as I am making such slow progress :(

It's nearly 11am UK time and can't see this thread yet, so hope I haven't duplicated!

 

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Jane Hamilton's Book of Ruth
by shugga 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

 

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Read a play yesterday...today it's continuing with my...
by wingKatethegreytwing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Thinking Map manuals (found a couple of little edits that I'll let someone know about), and begin reading The Wars by Timothy Findley.

 

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Still reading Gone with the wind
by Caroley 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

and still enjoying it. I'm just about to curl up on the sofa for an hour or two with it :-)

 

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Chicken Soup for the Canadian Soul
by wingSouthernfryedwing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

It's a perfect book to be reading while enjoying the Olympics.

 

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For One More Day by Mitch Albom. Finished The Book
by Poobah1 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Thief finally and am certainly glad I did. Difficult but intriguing writing style.

 

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Re: For One More Day by Mitch Albom. Finished The Book
by Genie6999 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I just love his books. Have you read others?

 

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Re: For One More Day by Mitch Albom. Finished The Book
by Poobah1 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

Yes, I think I've read them all. They're easy to digest when you need a one day book. The more I read of his work, the less I'm liking him. I think I'm just growing out of this type of writing. http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/7768552

 

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Still Tom Jones!
by pinkydinky 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

 

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Profiles in Courage by John F. Kennedy
by denny08 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

 

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Just starting Captain Sir Richard Frances Burton by Edward Price
by MissTree 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

The subtitle is: The Secret Agent Who Made the Pilgrimage to Mecca, Discovered the Kama Sutra and Brought The Arabian Nights to the West. (I guess you can see why there wasn't enough room for the subtitle in the subject line.)

I'm not far in, (about pg. 30 or so), but I'm already finding it quite interesting. At the moment there are some fascinting bits of the history of the British and Russians in Afghanistan and the region in general.

I'm sure I'll enjoy this.

I also just finished People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks. It was a masterpiece! Billiant!

 

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Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier
by wingNu-Kneeswing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

for next week's reading group discussion. I'm about 120 pages in and loving it! It's bringing back happy memories of trips to Lyme Regis and reminding me of everything I ever knew about fossils and fossil-hunting :-)

 

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Re: Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier
by wingKatethegreytwing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Oh, I'm so glad to read that you are enjoying it. I love Chevalier's writing - although some of her novels have definitely been stronger than others - and have this one on my list to read before the end of the month. :-)

 

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Re: Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier
by wingNu-Kneeswing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

> I love Chevalier's writing- although some
> of her novels have definitely been
> stronger than others

Exactly! I'd say this is one of the stronger ones, back on form after the disappointing Burning Bright, which I actually enjoyed, less than some of her others but I still found it an interesting read, although I know some people were very negative about it!

 

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Re: Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier
by wingKatethegreytwing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

And I agree re: Burning Bright. I enjoyed it but was disappointed.

 

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Finished Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier
by wingNu-Kneeswing 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I had the house to myself last night, nothing and nobody to distract me from reading, so I just kept turning pages and didn't go to bed until I'd finished this entertaining and interesting novel. I've been googling Mary Anning and Elizabeth Philpot ....

 

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Started Trumpet by Jackie Kay this morning
by wingNu-Kneeswing 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

The first few pages have caught my imagination. I've not read this author before but so far I like her writing style.

 

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Re: Started Trumpet by Jackie Kay this morning
by house-elfdobby 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

> The first few pages have caught my
> imagination. I've not read this author
> before but so far I like her writing
> style.

Oooh I liked that book Nu-Knees, I love the way she writes. Oh and I've not forgotten about Runestones, will pop in the post soon x

 

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Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert
by house-elfdobby 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I'm enjoying it so far but the friend who passed it on to me said she got a bit scunnered with it about halfway through - so far so good though, but it's giving me itchy feet - I need to travel, my wanderlust is a-calling!

 

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Re: Started Trumpet by Jackie Kay this morning
by wingNu-Kneeswing 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

> Oh and I've not forgotten about
> Runestones, will pop in the post soon x

Well, I had! LOL! Thanks for the reminder! I look forward to reading it :-)

 

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Midway through Light From Heaven by Jan Karon
by linreadsalot 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

and

The Empty House by Rosamunde Pilcher

 

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Reading the OED by Ammon Shea (excerpt follows)
by QueenBoadicea 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Subtitle: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages

Ammon Shea undertook an incredible task. He read the complete Oxford English Dictionary (hereafter referred to as “OED”). As in any good book about words, I read the introduction. For me, a good introduction is like terrific foreplay that you know will lead to phenomenal sex. You don’t rush through it; it’s a way to prolong the entire act and you can always come back to it when you’ve finished the main event. ;)

Excerpt:

Exordium (definition: introduction)

There are some great words in the Oxford English Dictionary. Words that are descriptive, intriguing, and funny. Words like artolater (a worshipper of bread). It is unlikely you have ever seen artolater written or heard it used in speech, as it hasn’t been used much since the seventeenth century. It is in the OED, but even if you own this magnificent dictionary it is still highly improbable that you have ever seen this word.

If you were to sit down and force yourself to read the whole thing over the course of several months, three things would likely happen: you would learn a great number of new words, your eyesight would suffer considerably, and your mind would most definitely slip a notch. One would have to be mad to seriously consider such an undertaking. I took on the project with great excitement.

Some people collect matchbox cars or comic books. Others collect more obviously valuable things, such as rare paintings or cars. Most of these collections are made up of tangible objects, things to which one can assign some sort of monetary value.

I collect words.

I do not collect these words because I want to impress friends and colleagues with my erudition. For most of the past ten years while I have been reading dictionaries and collecting words I’ve been employed as a furniture mover in New York, and the words I’ve learned in old dictionaries would be…singularly inapplicable in that milieu.

I view “Reading the OED” as the thinking person’s CliffsNotes to the greatest dictionary in the world. It is also an account of the pain, headache, and loss of sanity that comes from spending months and months searching through this mammoth and formidable dictionary—and pulling together all of its most beautiful and remarkable words.

If you are interested in vocabulary that is both spectacularly useful and beautifully useless, read on, and enjoy the efforts of a man who is in love with words. I have read the OED so that you don’t have to.

End of excerpt.

 

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Re: Reading the OED by Ammon Shea (excerpt follows)
by Ibis3 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Am I the only one who thinks that would be an amazing project? Man, I'd be tempted to follow in his footsteps after reading this book (but I'm putting it on my wishlist anyway!!). Thanks QB.

ETA: When I first saw your post title (i.e. until I read it properly) I thought that you were reading the OED!

 

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Re: Reading the OED by Ammon Shea (excerpt follows)
by QueenBoadicea 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

> Am I the only one who thinks that would be
> an amazing project? Man, I'd be tempted to
> follow in his footsteps after reading this
> book (but I'm putting it on my wishlist
> anyway!!). Thanks QB.

> ETA: When I first saw your post title
> (i.e. until I read it properly) I thought
> that you were reading the OED!

As Mr. Shea stated, he read it so I don’t have to. Good for him.

He peppers his book with various words that he thought fascinating and that he felt was a shame had lapsed from common usage.

Examples:

Abluvion (n.) Substance or things that are washed away.
Chances are you have never stared at the dirty bathwater washing down the drain and wondered, Is there a word for that? but now you will forever be cursed with the knowledge that indeed there is.
Also see: illutible

Apricity (n.) The warmth of the sun in winter.
A strange and lovely word. Not to be confused with apricate (to bask in the sun), although both come from the Latin apricus, meaning exposed to the sun.

Atrate (n.) One dressed in black; a mourner.

Although atrate is used rather specifically to describe a mourner, it is still quite nice to know that since at least the early seventeenth century there has been a word for that thoroughly modern character, the Goth teen (or average New Yorker) dressed all in black. We also have a word for describing someone who is wearing scarlet (coccinated) and the state of being dressed in purple (porporate).

My note - Also see: Severus Snape (hah!)

 

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Re: Reading the OED by Ammon Shea (excerpt follows)
by QueenBoadicea 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Here’s a truly funny bit under the letter G.

Excerpt:

Goat-drunk (adj.) Made lascivious by alcohol.
According to the redoubtable Thomas Nashe, the author of “The Anatomie of Absurditie”, “Christ’s Teares over Jerusalem”, and many other important works of English literature, there are eight types of drunkards, of which the one who is goat-drunk is seventh. Since the OED has seen fit to include only a few from Nashe’s list I have decided to include it in its entirety, so that you may never be at a loss for words when confronted by a drunk of any sort.

1. Ape-drunke – “he leapes, and sings, and hollowes, and daunceth for the heavens.” The kind of drunk who decides to belt out Broadway tunes and tap dance down the street.

2. Lion-drunke – “he flings the pots abut the house, calls his Hostesse whore, breakes the glasse windows with his dagger, and is apt to quarrel with any man that speaks to him.” A violent type who’ll pick a fight with a Hell’s Angel when he’s had a few; also known as “wife beater”.

3. Swine-drunke – “heavy lumpish, and sleepie, and cries for a little more drinke.” Best kind of drunk – the kind who drinks and promptly passes out.

4. Sheepe-drunke – “wise in his owne conceipt, when he cannot bring forth a right word.” A drunk who imagines himself to be Sophocles and babbles incoherently to anyone unfortunate to be in his presence.

5. Mawdlen-drunke – “when a fellowe will weepe for kindness in the midst of his Ale, and kisse you, saying; By God Captaine I love thee, goe they waies thou dost not thinke so often of me as I do of thee, I would (if it pleased GOD) I could not love thee so well as I doo, and then he puts his finger in his eie, and cries.” A weepy, pathetic sadsack who will sob over his ex-girlfriend, lost job and dead dog and declare you his best friend in the world just because you were listening to his sad tirade. The violent drunk is almost preferable to this loser.

6. Martin-drunke – “when a man is drunke and drinkes himselfe sober ere he stirre.” No clue. At a guess, I’d hazard that this is a person who drinks to forget and then forgets to stop drinking, claiming that more drink will help clear his head.

7. Goat-drunk (See above.) – The randy bastard who sees himself as a ladies’ man. In this case, it’s not “drink until they’re pretty”; it’s “drink until I’M pretty”.

8. Foxe-drunke – “when he is craftie drunke, as many of the Dutch men bee, and never bargain but when they are drunke.” I imagine this is the type of boozehound who engages in madcap, wild money-making schemes that actually seem like sensible notions. Surprisingly, a few of such schemes actually bear fruit, leading him to believe he will never have a good idea unless he’s had a snootful. See: authors, Homer Simpson.

 

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Re: Reading the OED by Ammon Shea (excerpt follows)
by MissTree 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Sounds interesting and funny. I'm glad a local library has acopy, but I don't think I'll check it out for a while. I want to whittle down Mt. TBR just a little bit, first, before reading anything else!

 

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I have read the first few pages of Throwaway Daughter by Ting-Xing Ye.
by bookwormkt 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

I think I am going to love it! The Moonstone will have to wait!

 

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Am loving Throwaway Daughter by Ting-Xing Ye, but will have to wait until tomorrow
by bookwormkt 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

to finish it, as I am nodding off now! I have a sneaky feeling I will chose to read something a bit faster moving than The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins! A couple of title are calling me. I'll see how I feel in the morning.

 

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Almost done Corelli's Mandolin - Hard wartime read for me (maybe WWII book
by wingNancyNovawing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

overload???). Started an Embarrassment of Mangoes.

 

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reading 1. God's Vitamin "C" for the Spirit of Women by Various -- 3/4 done; want
by wingbooklady331wing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

finish it

2. The Ten(der) Commandments by Ron Mehl -- a little each morning; will finish this week

3. The Cardinal of Kremlim by Tom Clancy -- great book; about 1/4 done

 

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Reading 'The Persian Boy' by Mary Renault...still
by ModMouse 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

I've been slow on it too. But then, I've been getting distracted lately. Don't know why.

 

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finishing God's Vitamin "C" for the Spirit of Women by Various; plus
by wingbooklady331wing 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

2. M is for Malice by Sue Grafton -- starting tonight

3. The Ten(der) Commandments by Ron Mehl -- a little each morning; will finish tomorrow or the next day

4. The Cardinal of Kremlim by Tom Clancy -- listening to in the car

Maybe this time it will show up. LOL

 

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The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea by Philip Hoare
by Captain-Peleg 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

Loving it. Hoare is really into Moby Dick so there's lots about New Bedford and Herman Melville.

 

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The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler
by jsmeltser 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

 

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Re: The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler
by Caroley 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

That's an excellent book - I really enjoyed it. Superb ending!

 

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Re: The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler
by jsmeltser 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I'm really enjoying it myself. In fact I almost wished that my shift would have been a bit longer last night so that I could finish it. Almost. :)
I've wanted to read Chandler for quite some time and now I'll definitely be reading more of his work.

 

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Now that I'm done with The Persian Boy
by ModMouse 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

The next book I will be reading is Tender Savage by Phoebe Conn

 

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One True Thing by Anna Quindlen
by Dove-i-libri 6 yrs ago (2/17/2010)

 

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A Ship Made of Paper by Scott Spencer
by wingBooksandMusicwing 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I'm almost done with it. Good writing, a story that is both wicked and mundane. The subject is adultery which is nearly as common and destructive as death.

 

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Two right now, which I rarely do...
by Genie6999 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I should finish reading After the Bomb by Gloria Miklowitz today and Gene Roddenberry: The Last Conversation by Yvonne Fern by the weekend.

 

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Reading the OED by Ammon Shea (excerpts follow)
by QueenBoadicea 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I have a few choice words for you.

What’s the word for that nasty grayish water swirling down the drain after a shower or bath?

Abluvion (n.) Substance or things that are washed away.

Did you ever wonder what that stuff that collects in the corner of your eyes is or whether there’s even a name for it? There is!

Gound (n.) The gunk that collects in the corners of the eyes.

What do you call that irritatingly chipper morning person? No, not THAT word.

Matutinal (adj.) Active or wide awake in the morning hours.

Is there a very special place set aside for reading books? Yes and it’s not a library.

Lectory (n.) A place for reading.

It’s so annoying when you can’t quite think of the right word. I mean, it’s just on the tip of my tongue… What IS it?!

Onomatomania (n.) Vexation at having difficulty in finding the right word.

I wonder if there’s a word for the scratching you do when you first wake up…

Pandiculation (n.) The act of stretching and extending the limbs, in tiredness or waking.
Everyone does it, and no one knows what to call it.

 

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Away by Amy Bloom
by dvg 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

A bookray that recently arrived; just starting it.

Finished: Piece of Work by Laura Zigman and really enjoyed it!

 

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Re-reading "Coupon Girl" by Becky Motew
by Germanophile 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I'm hoping to get her to make an appearance @ the bookstore where I'm an "intern." Maybe in spring, once the snow goes away (if it goes away).

 

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Amercian Gods - Neil Gaiman
by sothisdhampir 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

Only 50 pages in, but like it alot so far. Veeery Stephen King...but lacking King's ablity to ramble about nothing for 50 pages. Loving Gaiman so far :)

Also reading Death Note, Vol 7.

 

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'Methland' by Nick Reding
by leodog58 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

 

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I just started reading Cupido by Juliane Hoffman (German)
by wingBoekentrolwing 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

Very catching, scary, addictive!

 

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Reading three
by madmadge 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

Memories of the Storm by Marcia Willett
Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler
and
popped Poppyland by Rafaella Barker in my bag to read while I waited for Beloved in the hospital yesterday and am loving it.

 

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The swan theives
by jpetit 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

 

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I'm not letting myself start anything else until I finish A Tale of Two Cities
by TinaJean 6 yrs ago (2/18/2010)

I keep telling myself that sometimes it's okay to stop reading a book because it's awful...just can't bring myself to do it yet.

 

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Time for an easy gumshoe novel.
by Jean-Sol 6 yrs ago (2/19/2010)

I've read a few big and heavy-going books lately - mind you they were all (or nearly all) good so it was great, but I need some down-time, so I'm reading The Zebra-striped hearse by Ross McDonald, highly recommended by a fellow BCer at one of last year's Melbourne meetups.

 

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