corner corner 2017 Ultimate Challenge Themes and Guidelines

Forum | << Release Challenges | Refresh | Search

corner corner

Sort Options Toggle Stats Options


Profile Image

2017 Ultimate Challenge Themes and Guidelines

Welcome to the 2017 Ultimate Read/Release Challenge! I am the latest in a long line of hosts for this challenge, which started out as a TBR reading challenge and has changed to include releases and themes.

This challenge is for readers and/or releasers. Each book can earn up to three points:

Read = 1 point. All books count, including registered books, audiobooks, e-books, library books, and non-registered books.

Release = 1 point. Books must be registered. Both wild and controlled releases count and you can count releases from other challenges.

Theme = 1 point. If the book you read and/or release fits the monthly theme, you get another point. Each book can receive a theme point only once. Embedded words are allowed, and theme words can occur in the title or in the author’s name (except in December, when the theme is names).

You can read a book one month and release it during another month, or release books you’ve read in the past or haven’t read at all. Just remember that a book can receive a theme point in only one month.

Book titles can be in any language.

Join us at any time! I will post a new thread each month where you will list your books and the points you’ve accumulated. For BC books, please include the BC link in your post.

This is not meant to be an ultra-competitive challenge. The goal of the original challenge was simply to read more TBRs. For me, the main goals are to read more, to release books rather than hanging on to them, and to have fun choosing what I’ll read next.

Because I’m one of the least competitive people in the world, I will not be keeping a master points tally or awarding prizes for the most points. You can tailor this challenge to make it more difficult or competitive. For example, set a points goal at the beginning of the year, count only books that fit the theme, don’t use embedded words, or challenge a BC friend to a competition.

Some participants like genre-related themes and others don’t. I’ve included genres or general topics in some months. If you don’t like them, just stick with the word themes. I’ve also incorporated themes from established release challenges, ideas from participants and themes that appeared in past years. Thanks for your ideas! I’ve saved any I didn’t have room for as possibilities for next year.

Here are the themes for 2017 and some examples of acceptable books:

January: Clean start—words that appear in soap brand names; words related to cleaning (e.g., bath, mop, fresh) or to beginnings (e.g., start, new). Also, books in which a main character is a janitor, cleaner, or maid, or books on cleaning or decluttering, even without a theme word. This theme was inspired by zbird’s 2016 Soap challenge; see that thread for a list of ideas: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/526090.
Examples: Uppity Women of the New World; Words from a Glass Bubble; The Woman at the WASHington Zoo

February: Food and drink— any type of food or drink, as well as words related to cooking and eating (e.g., bread, tea, boil, snack). Also, cookbooks and books (fiction or nonfiction) where the main character is a cook, bartender, caterer, or restaurant owner, even without a theme word. There has been a Food and Wine challenge in late February/early March. Last year’s thread is here: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/528394.
Examples: A Girl from Yamhill; Fasting, Feasting; Cold Sassy Tree by OLIVE Ann Burns

March: Four elements—words related to the four elements: earth, wind, fire, and water (e.g., dirt, breeze, smoke, lake). This theme coincides with the long-running 4 Elements challenge. See last year’s post for a list of words: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/528086.
Examples: On a Cold Road: Tales of Adventure in Canadian ROCK; The Other Side of the Ocean; The Wind in the Willows

April: Directions—words related to directions: north, south, east, west, up, down, in, out, forward, back, backward, toward, away.
Examples: East of Eden; Out of Africa; North Star Conspiracy

May: Royalty and aristocracy—words related to royalty and aristocracy in any culture (e.g., tsar, castle, crown). Also, books (fiction or nonfiction) where a main character is a member of the royalty or aristocracy, even without a theme word.
Examples: The King’s Bishop; Royal Flush; The Many Lives and Secret Sorrows of Josephine B.

June: Family—Words for family members (e.g., mother, aunt, brother, son, child, baby, wife, spouse, partner), as well as the words “family” and “related” and “relation.” Words that don’t usually refer to relatedness (e.g., girl, boy, woman, man) are not accepted.
Examples: The True and Outstanding Adventures of the Hunt Sisters; Mother of Pearl; With Child

July: Senses—words related to the five senses: sight, taste, smell, hearing, touch (e.g., feel, stare, sniff). See solittletime’s 2016 Be Sensible post for ideas of acceptable words: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/531735.
Examples: Close Her Eyes; A Touch of Frost; The Scent of Rain and Lightning

August: Books and Bookcrossing—words related to books (e.g., page, cover, write) and Bookcrossing (e.g., release, journal, catch, post). Also, books (fiction or nonfiction) about writers or editors and nonfiction books about writing and editing, even without a theme word. The phrase “A novel” used as a subtitle doesn’t count. Also, books that are related to a Bookcrosser’s name (e.g., a book with “cat” in the title relates to tabby-cat-owner). Please explain the relationship if it’s not obvious.
Examples: The Bookman’s Promise; People of the Book; The Copyeditor’s Handbook

September: Mail—words related to mail (e.g., letter, post, send, stamp). Also nonfiction collections of letters and epistolary novels (told through a series of letters), even without a theme word.
Examples: Dear Exile; The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh; Postcards from the Edge

October: Time—words related to measurement of time (e.g., hour, watch, year). This theme coincides with the Tick Tock challenge. Last year’s thread contains a link to a list of related words: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/533520.
Examples: The Night She Died; Seven Dials; Year of Wonders

November: Double letters—any title or author’s name which has two consecutive identical letters.
Examples: The Apothecary Rose by Candace RoBB; Six FEEt Under; Caspar the CoMMuting Cat

December: First names—Books (fiction or nonfiction, including biography) containing someone’s first name in the title. If the title contains a last name that can also be used for a first name (e.g., Scott), that counts. Also, baby name books and books with the word “name” in the title. For obvious reasons, author’s names can’t be counted this month. This theme coincides with the What’s in a Name? challenge. See last year’s post here: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/535547.
Examples: The Riddle of St. Leonard’s; Typhoid Mary; The Divine Ryans

Complete Thread

Profile Image
Welcome to the 2017 Ultimate Read/Release Challenge! I am the latest in a long line of hosts for this challenge, which started out as a TBR reading challenge and has changed to include releases and themes.

This challenge is for readers and/or releasers. Each book can earn up to three points:

Read = 1 point. All books count, including registered books, audiobooks, e-books, library books, and non-registered books.

Release = 1 point. Books must be registered. Both wild and controlled releases count and you can count releases from other challenges.

Theme = 1 point. If the book you read and/or release fits the monthly theme, you get another point. Each book can receive a theme point only once. Embedded words are allowed, and theme words can occur in the title or in the author’s name (except in December, when the theme is names).

You can read a book one month and release it during another month, or release books you’ve read in the past or haven’t read at all. Just remember that a book can receive a theme point in only one month.

Book titles can be in any language.

Join us at any time! I will post a new thread each month where you will list your books and the points you’ve accumulated. For BC books, please include the BC link in your post.

This is not meant to be an ultra-competitive challenge. The goal of the original challenge was simply to read more TBRs. For me, the main goals are to read more, to release books rather than hanging on to them, and to have fun choosing what I’ll read next.

Because I’m one of the least competitive people in the world, I will not be keeping a master points tally or awarding prizes for the most points. You can tailor this challenge to make it more difficult or competitive. For example, set a points goal at the beginning of the year, count only books that fit the theme, don’t use embedded words, or challenge a BC friend to a competition.

Some participants like genre-related themes and others don’t. I’ve included genres or general topics in some months. If you don’t like them, just stick with the word themes. I’ve also incorporated themes from established release challenges, ideas from participants and themes that appeared in past years. Thanks for your ideas! I’ve saved any I didn’t have room for as possibilities for next year.

Here are the themes for 2017 and some examples of acceptable books:

January: Clean start—words that appear in soap brand names; words related to cleaning (e.g., bath, mop, fresh) or to beginnings (e.g., start, new). Also, books in which a main character is a janitor, cleaner, or maid, or books on cleaning or decluttering, even without a theme word. This theme was inspired by zbird’s 2016 Soap challenge; see that thread for a list of ideas: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/526090.
Examples: Uppity Women of the New World; Words from a Glass Bubble; The Woman at the WASHington Zoo

February: Food and drink— any type of food or drink, as well as words related to cooking and eating (e.g., bread, tea, boil, snack). Also, cookbooks and books (fiction or nonfiction) where the main character is a cook, bartender, caterer, or restaurant owner, even without a theme word. There has been a Food and Wine challenge in late February/early March. Last year’s thread is here: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/528394.
Examples: A Girl from Yamhill; Fasting, Feasting; Cold Sassy Tree by OLIVE Ann Burns

March: Four elements—words related to the four elements: earth, wind, fire, and water (e.g., dirt, breeze, smoke, lake). This theme coincides with the long-running 4 Elements challenge. See last year’s post for a list of words: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/528086.
Examples: On a Cold Road: Tales of Adventure in Canadian ROCK; The Other Side of the Ocean; The Wind in the Willows

April: Directions—words related to directions: north, south, east, west, up, down, in, out, forward, back, backward, toward, away.
Examples: East of Eden; Out of Africa; North Star Conspiracy

May: Royalty and aristocracy—words related to royalty and aristocracy in any culture (e.g., tsar, castle, crown). Also, books (fiction or nonfiction) where a main character is a member of the royalty or aristocracy, even without a theme word.
Examples: The King’s Bishop; Royal Flush; The Many Lives and Secret Sorrows of Josephine B.

June: Family—Words for family members (e.g., mother, aunt, brother, son, child, baby, wife, spouse, partner), as well as the words “family” and “related” and “relation.” Words that don’t usually refer to relatedness (e.g., girl, boy, woman, man) are not accepted.
Examples: The True and Outstanding Adventures of the Hunt Sisters; Mother of Pearl; With Child

July: Senses—words related to the five senses: sight, taste, smell, hearing, touch (e.g., feel, stare, sniff). See solittletime’s 2016 Be Sensible post for ideas of acceptable words: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/531735.
Examples: Close Her Eyes; A Touch of Frost; The Scent of Rain and Lightning

August: Books and Bookcrossing—words related to books (e.g., page, cover, write) and Bookcrossing (e.g., release, journal, catch, post). Also, books (fiction or nonfiction) about writers or editors and nonfiction books about writing and editing, even without a theme word. The phrase “A novel” used as a subtitle doesn’t count. Also, books that are related to a Bookcrosser’s name (e.g., a book with “cat” in the title relates to tabby-cat-owner). Please explain the relationship if it’s not obvious.
Examples: The Bookman’s Promise; People of the Book; The Copyeditor’s Handbook

September: Mail—words related to mail (e.g., letter, post, send, stamp). Also nonfiction collections of letters and epistolary novels (told through a series of letters), even without a theme word.
Examples: Dear Exile; The Letters of Vincent Van Gogh; Postcards from the Edge

October: Time—words related to measurement of time (e.g., hour, watch, year). This theme coincides with the Tick Tock challenge. Last year’s thread contains a link to a list of related words: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/533520.
Examples: The Night She Died; Seven Dials; Year of Wonders

November: Double letters—any title or author’s name which has two consecutive identical letters.
Examples: The Apothecary Rose by Candace RoBB; Six FEEt Under; Caspar the CoMMuting Cat

December: First names—Books (fiction or nonfiction, including biography) containing someone’s first name in the title. If the title contains a last name that can also be used for a first name (e.g., Scott), that counts. Also, baby name books and books with the word “name” in the title. For obvious reasons, author’s names can’t be counted this month. This theme coincides with the What’s in a Name? challenge. See last year’s post here: http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/23/535547.
Examples: The Riddle of St. Leonard’s; Typhoid Mary; The Divine Ryans
Profile Image
Please post January reads and releases here: http://www.bookcrossing.com/---/537436
Profile Image

Thank you

Thanks for running this again - I'm off to rummage through the TBR pile for appropriate books.
Profile Image
I usually do just themed releases, so just printed off the list so I can divide it up amongst the monthly set-aside availables and remember what's when!
Profile Image
I usually do just themed releases


Me too. All I list there are my themed releases. I really enjoy this Challenge.
Profile Image
Whether I'll manage to post in the monthly threads I doubt, but I will divide up my books at the beginning of the year into the themes, then put the current month's books in my 'current' shelf right opposite the end of my bed so I can pick from there when deciding what to read. If nothing else, it keeps my shelves dusted as I move the books around!
Profile Image
Nice themes.
Profile Image

Thanks jumpingin

Thanks for hosting the ultimate challenge again jumpingin, great themes! I'm looking forward to rearranging my bookshelf to fit the themes after I've tidied up the Christmas/New Years Eve mess. I like the clean start theme for January, very appropriate!

Are you sure you want to delete this item? It cannot be undone.